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This recent May, a group of us took a trip to Moab, Utah for some mountain biking. When we drove over Vail Pass on Friday, May 2, it was snowing. Winter did not want to lose grip on Colorado.

 

 

On the way to Moab, we stopped outside of Fruita, Colorado to try out the Western Rim Trail. We were running late and didn't get a chance to do the whole trail, but everyone agreed it was worth the stop.

 

 

One issue with a stop of any kind, is the migratory rock issue. If you don't know about rock migration, perhaps I can give you a heads-up.

 

 

It seems that rocks find a way to migrate into hydration packs, looking to be located somewhere new. How they find their way into a pack has not been documented. There are many theories about how a rock might appear in the pack of an unsuspecting rider, but none of these theories have been caught or documented by a camera.

 

 

What has been caught on camera is owners of packs finding these migratory rocks. Dennis Andersen can be seen below, removing a migratory rock from his hydration pack. There is some speculation that he carried this rock in his pack for an entire day of riding on the Soverign Trail system. Though he had three people riding with him, not one of them noticed the rock fly/roll/jump/crawl into his pack.

 

 

Make no mistake, rocks are sneaky.

 

 

 

 

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