Skip navigation

Active Expert: Gale Bernhardt

3 Posts tagged with the pulse_oximetry tag

For awhile, I’ve tried to determine if repeated short-term exposure to altitude can help with the acclimatization process. This curiosity is geared primarily for people living in a Front Range situation and then doing fun activities, training or racing in the mountains.

 

To help me determine if short-term exposure to altitude might help acclimatize people so that they can enjoy fun activities, training and racing at altitude, I picked up a pulse oximeter.  I mentioned the pulse oximeter in a 2010 blog. My personal interest in the numbers is for alpine skiing, Nordic skiing, trail running, road cycling, mountain biking and hiking.

 

A pulse oximeter is a non-invasive way to measure the amount of oxygen the blood is carrying. The number displayed is expressed as a percentage of the maximum amount the blood could carry at 100 percent. At sea level, typical saturation values are 97 to 99 percent in healthy people. At 5,000 feet it might drop to 95 percent and at around 10,000 feet it may dip to 90 percent. Somewhere around 10,000 feet there is a big change and oxygen saturation can drop to 80 percent or below.

 

Acclimatizing to various altitudes can help improve these numbers up to a point. Know there is individual variability in the acclimation process and there is even variability among native dwellers at any altitude, beginning at birth.

 

Children born at various altitudes have similar oxygen saturations during the first 24 to 48 hours of life and the values change within the first four months of life. For example, newborns in Denver, Colorado (5,280 feet, considered moderate altitude) have saturation levels of 85 to 97 percent while those born in Leadville, Colorado (10,152 feet, considered high altitude) are 85 to 93 percent.

 

 

Though the time periods noted in a medical column weren’t exactly the same, it is interesting to note that after four months, the Leadville infants were between 89 and 93 percent saturation during wakefulness. Healthy, awake infants under the age of two measured between 90 and 99 percent in Denver. So there was some shifting up, particularly on the low end.

 

You can pick up a pulse oximeter at many local pharmacies. A common use for these devices includes measuring oxygen saturation in people with compromised lung function. Pilots and mountain climbers also use the devices to determine when supplemental oxygen might be necessary to avoid fainting.

 

I’ve been playing with an oximeter to look at oxygen saturation at my house (roughly 5,000 ft. measured on my Garmin) and Frisco, Colorado (roughly 9,100 ft.) I did this because much of my fun, training and racing is done at altitudes of 7,500 ft. or more and I was curious if my oxygen saturation changed much between the Front Range and the Colorado mountains.

 

The next blog will be more about what I’ve noticed in my experiment of one.

 

Pulse-Oximeter.jpg

1,550 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: denver, hiking, mountain_biking, altitude, colorado, skiing, trail_running, acclimatization, nordic_skiing, pulse_oximetry, frisco, blood_oxygen_saturation, alpine_skiing, road_cycling

This post is a place to share your personal findings on pulse oximetry data.

 

I'll gather up a bit more information to post in a week or so, but here is a start:

 

My home (~5000 ft. elevation) readings (about six days of data  readings) on oximetry ranges between 97-98% for me (96-97% for Del, my husband that does not have asthma and he is not an endurance critter). Arrival to  Frisco, Colorado I was 91-92% pre-asthma meds (Del@ 95%). Same day I was 95% post-asthma meds and post-skiing.

 

The next morning I was at 94% pre-asthma meds, 97% just 30-minutes post-asthma meds, 93% at 9:30 pm (about 12 hours after asthma meds). The third morning at Frisco, near 48 hours after being at altitude I was bouncing between 96-97% pre-asthma meds. The next two days at Frisco produced the similar results at 95-96%. Returning home, I was pretty consistently at 98% every morning for four mornings. Know that I've been at altitude about once every 21-28 days for the last year. I'm there an average of two days at a time. It would be interesting to see numbers for me about 1.5 years ago before the monthly altitude pops. June of 2009, I really felt the altitude with almost a year of non-exposure I was huffing and puffing going up two flights of stairs. Exercise intensity was quite compromised. 

 

For this schtick at altitude, Del remainded pretty consistent at 92-95% in Frisco, 95-96% at home. His reduction was less than mine. Asthma? Or just individual differences in tolerance?

 

Comments or data sharing are certainly welcome here ~

646 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: altitude, exercise, asthma, pulse_oximetry

I had a great day of skiing at the Frisco Nordic Center on Wednesday. I think Bil Danielson lapped me about 10 times on the back climb. He's going to have a great ski at the Birkebeinder this year.

 

I intended to carry the video camera yesterday so you could see what fun Meeka has "skiing" (I ski, she runs all-out with a smile on her face); but I forgot the camera. I'll get that captured later.

 

I did try to get the outdoor activities in before today. Real feel at the writing of this blog is -29 degrees in Summit County. Beyond cold. (chart below)

 

In a previous blog I mentioned that I'm monitoring body temperature and pulse. That experiment continues.

 

Due to reviewing notes from the USA Cycling Coaching Summit, I decided to add pulse oximetry to my experiment. I'm curious about the values at home (about 5,000 ft. elevation) and in the mountains at about 9,000 ft. I want to know if values change as I stay at altitude and what affect (if any) my asthma medications have on the values. I'm looking for data to help my training and racing at altitude. I'll keep you posted on that as I go along.

 

Ending a great year and looking forward to an excellent 2011. Stay warm, and Happy New Year ~

 

Time

7a

8a

9a

10a

11a

12p

1p

2p

3p

4p

5p

6p

7p

8p

9p

10p

11p

12a

1a

2a

3a

4a

5a

6a

Temp   (°F)

-12

-13

-9

-7

-4

-2

-2

-2

-4

-5

-6

-9

-13

-16

-17

-19

-19

-19

-19

-16

-17

-17

-18

-17

Feels   Like

-32

-34

-30

-29

-26

-25

-25

-26

-29

-29

-31

-36

-41

-44

-44

-46

-46

-46

-46

-42

-44

-44

-45

-44

Wind   Speed

12

13

15

17

18

21

23

24

24

23

24

25

24

23

21

20

20

19

19

20

20

20

20

20

Wind   Dir

Dew   Pt

-14

-16

-15

-15

-15

-13

-13

-13

-14

-13

-13

-15

-19

-22

-22

-24

-24

-24

-23

-21

-21

-21

-22

-21

Skies

Precip

Precip   Amt (inches)

.03

.03

.01


.01


.02

.04

.08

.08

.08

.06

.05

.02

.05

.05

.03

.04

.05

.01

.02

.02

.02


%   Hum

88

86

70

61

53

52

53

55

57

63

65

71

71

70

71

75

76

75

76

76

76

77

78

79

659 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: pulse_oximetry, summit_county, frisco, birkenbeinder