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Active Expert: Gale Bernhardt

4 Posts tagged with the training_plans tag

For those of you that didn’t get into the Leadville 100 Mountain Bike Race via the early lottery, I mentioned in a previous blog that there would be three qualifier races this year. They are:

 

June 19th, 2011 100K Wilmington/Whiteface

July 10th, 2011 Lake Tahoe Trail 100K

July 31, 2011 Crested Butte Alpine Odyssey

 

The qualifiers are intentionally selected and designed to mimic the conditions at Leadville, sans the altitude.

 

Each of the events will have 100 slots for the qualification process. The qualification process at each event is:

Fifty (50) spots will be allocated based on the top age-group performance. The spots will be proportionally spread across age groups based on the age-group profile of registered athletes (e.g. if 70% of the registered athletes are men, then approximately 70%, or 35, of the slots will be allocated to men). There will be at least one qualifying spot per age group.

 

The other fifty (50) spots will be allocated by drawing among finishers who meet the time standard specific to that qualifier. The time standard for Leadville Qualifying Series Races is designed to establish a threshold level of performance that suggests that an athlete has a reasonable likelihood of finishing the Leadville Trail 100 in less than 12 hours.

 

The time standard will vary from race to race depending on the race's length, profile, total amount of climbing and base altitude. The number of spots per age group and the time standard for each race will be posted no less than 48 hours before the start of each race.

 

Only riders who achieve the time standard will receive a spot in the Leadville Trail 100.

 

Here are the links to see more information on the qualifying races and the qualification process/lottery

 

Leadville 100 Mountain Bike Training Resources.

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To help 100-mile mountain bike racers with some training references, this blog is a good start. Many of the resources can help 100-mile mountain bike racers for any event. Some of the resources are Leadville 100 specific.

 

First, training plan help.

 

In my newest book, Training Plans for Cyclists, you will find two foundation fitness training plans. (You can see the table of contents online.) The two foundation fitness plans are designed to help cyclists maintain or improve fitness in the off-season. Often, there are two Levels of training plan presented in the book. Level I is for completion and Level II is more competitive. Level I and Level II descriptions are also relative to event distance. For example, I classify a Level I rider looking at a 100-mile mountain bike race differently than a Level I road rider looking to complete a century. Of course, the event route itself can have a major influence.

 

The book contains detailed, daily workouts. (Not just general instructions on how to assemble your own plan.) Here are athlete profile descriptions:

 

Level I Profile (Chapter 19)

The plan in this chapter is designed for a Level I rider. Before beginning the plan, you are riding two or three times per week, indoors or outdoors; but, your workouts are not consistent. It is not a problem for you to ride for an hour, though.

 

You are looking to build strength, endurance and increase your riding speed. You’d like to begin a weight training program, but don’t know where to begin.

 

One big issue you have is time. There is never enough time and you don’t have much of it to devote to staying fit. If you can see a training plan that would whip you into shape on three to six hours a week, you’d jump up and down.

 

Get ready to jump.

 

(This plan is available in electronic form on TrainingPeaks )

 

Level II Profile

The plan in this chapter is designed for a Level II cyclist that is riding three or four times per week before beginning the plan. You are currently capable of comfortably completing a two-and-a-half hour ride. Your current long ride is mostly aerobic, but may include a small amount of intensity.

 

You are looking to build strength, endurance and increase your riding speed for next season. You want a weight training program included in your plan that will deliver on-the-bike speed later.

 

Your schedule allows you to train six or seven days per week.

 

(This plan is available in electronic form on TrainingPeaks )

 

It really doesn’t matter what your season goals are (road vs. mountain) because the foundation fitness plans can be used for preparation for century rides, multi-day tours, short-course mountain bike racing, 24-hour races or 100-mile mountain bike races.

 

After you have built foundation fitness on your own or used one of the above plans, then you transfer that fitness to a more event-specific plan taking you right up to race day.

 

Keeping attention focused on just the mountain bike events for now, below are the plan descriptions contained in the book:

 

Chapter 16, Level I Rider, 100 Mile Mountain Bike Race, 16 Week Plan

PROFILE

Before beginning this plan, you are riding consistently and doing between five and six hours of training each week. Your long ride is around two hours long and it includes some intensity as well as hill riding. At least one other ride during the week contains some intensity. That ride can be an indoor spinning class.

 

If your current fitness does not meet the description above, begin your training journey in Chapter 19 to build foundation fitness. After the last week of the Chapter 19 training plan, begin with Week 1 of this chapter.

 

During the week, you are limited to an hour of training on three days. You need two days off for other activities. Additionally, you do not have time to commute to a mountain course, so the training needs to be on an indoor trainer, spin class or a road bike.

 

GOAL

Your goal is to comfortably complete a 100-mile mountain bike race. While you want to ride in a time that is as fast as possible, you realize you are restricted for training time. You want the best time, given your limited training time.

 

(The biggest training week is 13:30. The online version of this race-specific plan is found here.)

 

Chapter 17, Level II Rider, 100 Mile Mountain Bike Race, 14 Week Plan

PROFILE

Before beginning this plan, you are training approximately nine hours per week. You are riding two long rides each week. One ride is around two hours long and the second one is roughly three hours in length.

 

You are riding two or three other weekday rides that are an hour each. You may or may not be strength training.

 

This plan is designed to follow the Level II Foundation Fitness training plan found in Chapter 20. After completing 18 weeks of that plan, you can move directly into the plan in this chapter. That combination provides you with 32 weeks of training.

 

If you are not using the Chapter 20 training plan, review the last few weeks of that training plan. Before beginning this training plan you should be capable of completing those workouts, or similar workouts, both in time and intensity.

 

Due to the volume of training necessary to complete this plan you will need to focus on recovery as much as you focus on accomplishing the training. Improved performance is accompanied by recovery techniques and high density nutrition. In summary, in addition to completing the training sessions, you need to get adequate rest and eat nutritious foods that fuel a high performance body. Be sure to read Chapter 3 that covers nutrition.

 

GOAL

Your goal is to ride a 100-mile mountain bike race in a personal best time. This competitive goal is more than just completing the event, it is competing at the event. The competition may be for a spot on the podium or to beat a past personal record (PR). You want a new PR.

 

(The biggest training week is 22:00. The online version of this race plan is found here.)

 

Now that the training portion is covered, below is more information within columns and blogs:

 

Description of key points and challenges in the Leadville 100 mountain bike race: (Note that the entry numbers are low compared to 2009 because the column was written in 2005):

Race Across the Sky: The Leadville 100 Mountain Bike Race – Part I

 

Description of key training elements to any 100-mile mountain bike race and a few Leadville specifics:

Race Across the Sky: The Leadville 100 Mountain Bike Race – Part II

 

Two-part training-specific interview with Dave Wiens after he beat Lance Armstrong in the 2008 race:

How to Win the Leadville 100 Mountain Bike Race, An Interview with Dave Wiens Part I

How to Win the Leadville 100 Mountain Bike Race, An Interview with Dave Wiens Part II

 

Acclimatizing to altitude before a race:

Acclimating to Altitude Before a Race Part I

Acclimating to Altitude Before a Race Part II

 

Altitude training strategies:

Altitude training for athletic success Part I

Altitude training for athletic success Part II

 

Post-race analysis of items that affected one of my personal races

Snow can be on the course in the weeks pre-race

Wiens and Williams family photos – for fun

 

A general list of columns that can be used by all endurance athletes.

 

Found here is my personal training plan, unconventional for a mountain bike racer. I will often post what I’m doing for training on this blog, Twitter and Facebook. I also try to answer as many questions as I can on this blog.

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If you want a training plan (or a variety of new workouts) to help you achieve your 2010 goals, I have designed several resources to help you. Know that I wrote my first easy-to-follow training plan and subsequent first book because that is exactly what I wanted as a self-coached athlete.

 

Just give me a plan to follow so I can do the workouts when it fits my personal schedule and so I can make modifications to a plan to fit my personal needs.

Also know that all training plan are designs are based on the same foundation principles that help elite athletes reach their goals; then, modified to meet the needs and time constraints of non-paid athletes. The plans range from comfortably completing events to gunning for a personal record (PR) performance.

 

The plans are available in a couple of different formats – electronic, book and possible combinations. Depending on what you need, one format may work better than another. First, there are several plans available on Active Trainer. This format makes it easy to move workouts around and modify them to fit your personal needs. There is some device download capability and there is data analysis to help you evaluate your training accomplishments. Be sure to take a look at all of the free downloads available on that page.

 

Also available on the Active Network are columns and blogs to help self-coached athletes succeed.

 

I have written several books to help self-coached athletes succeed. Some of the individual training plans are available in the electronic format on Active Trainer referenced in a previous paragraph and in hard copy within a chapter of one of these books:

 

Training Plans for Multisport Athletes – A book containing 14 detailed training plans for triathlon, duathlon and X-Terra events. There are plans for sprint triathlons, Olympic triathlons, half-ironman distance triathlons and ironman-distance triathlons. In addition to shorter plans, this great training resource contains three, six-month plans and a year-long plan.

 

Training Plans for Cyclists - This book was written based on the large number of requests I received from road and mountain bike riders, who were familiar with Training Plans for Multisport Athletes. They too wanted a book laid out for reaching new endurance goals, maintaining foundation fitness and racing. This book contains 16 such training plans. The book is written so you can mix and match various training plans. Advice is giving within the book on how to mix and match, as well as how to modify individual plans if you are self-coached. There are ride plans for 30-, 50- and 100-mile (century rides) events. There are five touring event plans and five mountain bike plans. For the off-season, there are two foundation fitness (base training) plans. Explanations are given for Level I riders and Level II riders.

Triathlon Training Basics – This book contains four detailed training plans to help first-time triathletes prepare for a sprint triathlon or an Olympic distance triathlon. Two plans are designed for already-fit beginners and two plans are for currently-unfit beginners. There are also four plans per sport (swimming, cycling and running) for individuals wanting to train for a triathlon as a single-sport team member. The plans can be used in succession, helping you progress from a triathlon team member to a triathlete. The book contains strength training, stretching and bike fit photos to help you get started on the right track. (None of the plans are the same as those found in Training Plans for Multisport Athletes.)

 

Bicycling for Women – Great chapters “for women only” and five training plans to help you complete a 50-mile bike ride, a century, a 40-kilometer time trial or faster group riding, a multiday tour or improve your hill climbing skills. This book is written on the premise that women can, and do, ride fast. (None of the plans are the same as those found in Training Plans for Cyclists.)

 

Workouts in a Binder® – I created “Workouts in a Binder®” product and co-authored the first edition of swim workouts for triathletes, which quickly sold out four printings. These handy workout cards help athletes and coaches optimize workouts and are waterproof to prevent destruction from water, sweat and dirt. This product is so popular, the series has expanded and will continue to grow:

Workouts in a Binder® for Triathletes

Workouts in a Binder® for Swimmers, Triathletes and Coaches

Workouts in a Binder® for Indoor Cycling

Workouts in a Binder® for Runners and Triathletes

 

Successful training doesn’t have to break the bank.

 

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New cycling plans!

Posted by Gale Bernhardt Apr 15, 2009

You asked, we delivered. There are four new cycling plans live on Active Trainer. If you are new to cycling or need to get rolling again, you can easily get jump-started into an endurance program with the six week plan that takes you from zero cycling to comfortably riding 30 miles in just six weeks.

 

There are plans for your first 50-mile ride and for your first century ride. The plans are written with the busy person in mind. Plan lengths range from six to 12 weeks. Workout days are typically three days of cycling with optional strength training days in some of the plans. Two century plans are included, with one for a rider more concerned with comfortably completing the event and a second plan that is more performance oriented.

 

All the plans are designed to help you successfully train for an event and help you get into a cycling routine. Your routine can be maintained for as long as you please or you can seek new goals.

 

If you want to get back in the saddle, improve your current fitness level or help a buddy get fit, check out these training plans:

 

30-mile ride, fast track to fitness, 6-week plan[30-mile ride, fast track to fitness, 6-week plan|http://training.active.com//TransactionManager/viewPlan.do?tpId=5509]

100k or 50-mile ride for limited time and fitness, 8-week plan

Level I Century Rider, 12-week plan

Level II Century Rider, improved performance, 12-week plan

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