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Looking for 10 hours of continuing education credits? Keep reading!

Here’s your chance to update your sports nutrition knowledge while enjoying an information-packed workshop with two internationally known professionals:

Sports nutritionist Nancy Clark MS, RD, CSSD is respected for her skills with helping athletes and exercisers enhance their performance and achieve their desired physiques.

• Exercise physiologist WilliamEvans PhD is renown for his research on protein, exercise, and aging—plus his ability to translate that information into “how to” tips.


This 1.5-day program is designed to help both health professionals as well as serious athletes. You’ll find answers to your questions about how to--

--improve athletic performance with a winning sports diet.

--manage weight issues and resolve disordered eating practices.

—invest in lifelong health for longevity

--further your athletic and/or professional career.

Ten hours of education for ACE, AFAA, AND, ACSM, CHES, NATA, NSCA.

“I was surprised to learn new information on a topic I thought I knew so well.”

            --Registered dietitian/personal trainer, Seattle

 

Sept 20-21, 2013  NEW YORK CITY at Columbia Teacher's College

Oct 4-5   BOSTON at Yawkey Special Olympics Training Center in Marlborough

Oct 11   PROVIDENCE (Friday only) - at URI Downtown campus

 

Jan. 24-25, 2014   PHILADELPHIA atLaSalle University

Feb. 7-8    PITTSBURGH at Allegheny General Hosital Conference Center

 

ONLINE:  Every day!

You’ll listen to the speakers’ voices and see their PowerPoint presentations. Almost as good as being there in person!

 

Please visit http://www.sportsnutritionworkshop.com for more details.

 

 

NOTE: If you live near any of the workshop locations, please share this announcement with coaches, athletic trainers, personal trainers,dietitians, nutrition educators, and yes, serious athletes themselves.

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Question:

I just finished reading an article you write about protein for athletes and you did not mention nuts at all.

I thought nuts were a good source of protein?

 

Answer:

Nuts are indeed a healthful food and offer a nice array of vitamins and minerals.

People who eats nuts (including nut butters) two or more times a week reduce

their risk of heart disease by more than 20%! And despite popular belief, nut-eaters

are not fatter than people who refrain from eating nuts.

 

That said, nuts are a good, but not great, source of protein.

Nuts are called an "incomplete" protein, because they lack

some of the essential amino acids needed to build muscles.

But you can solve that problem by eating nuts with beans/legumes,

whole grains, and dairy foods. Think toast with peanut butter and

a yogurt for breakfast. Or soynuts mixed with almonds.

 

You have to eat a lot of nuts to get a hefty dose of protein:
--2 tablespoons of peanut butter has only about 8 or 9 grams of protein.

--25 almonds (two lady-like or 1 macho handful) has only about 5 or 6 grams of protein.

 

If your goal is 20 to 30 grams of protein per meal, you'll likely want a

tall glass of milk with your PB sandwich or cottage cheese with the almonds!

Or just go nuts over nuts!

 

Nancy

 

For more protein info:

Nancy Clark's Sports Nutrition Guidebook

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Nancy Clark RD CSSD

Nancy Clark RD CSSD

Member since: Jul 8, 2007

Hi! I specialize in nutrition for exercise, and help active people figure out how to manage food, weight, exercise, energy and enjoyment of eating. Let me know if you have any questions!

View Nancy Clark RD CSSD's profile