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Are you an active woman who has stopped having regular menstrual periods?

Do you want to participate in a research study?

If so, please keep reading!

 

The Female Athlete Program at Boston’s Children's Hospital and Dr. Madhu Misra,

head of the Sports Endocrine Research Lab of the Neuroendocrine Unit at Massachusetts

General Hospital are specifically recruiting female athletes aged 14-25 who do not menstruate

regularly.  The study focuses on bone density. Estrogen (needed for women to have regular

menstrual periods) plays a key role in maintaining and building strong bones through adolescence. 

Female athletes who have stopped menstruating often lose bone density and suffer stress fractures.

 

Participants will receive free bone density testing, hormonal and nutritional evaluation, metabolic rate

tests, and VO2 max testing.  They will also receive a stipend of up to $625.

 

This is a great opportunity to learn more about your body AND contribute towards the health of other

female athletes. Contact Kate to see if you are eligible to participate: KWARGO@PARTNERS.ORG

 

Best,

Nancy

 

For more information about the Female Athlete Triad and the links between exercise, stress fractures,

nutrition and amenorrhea, read the chapter on Dieting Gone Awry in Nancy Clark’s Sports Nutrition Guidebook.

902 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: triad, amenorrhea, female_athlete, bone_density, research_study

Swish and spit?

Posted by Nancy Clark RD CSSD Jul 24, 2013

If you will be exercising for more than one to two hours, you will have better energy

if you fuel during the exercise session.The recommended intake is:

-- 30 grams (120 calories) of carbohydrate per hour during 1 to 2 hours of exercise

-- 60-90 gram (240-360 calories) of carbohydrate per hour for exercise lasting more than 2.5 hours.

What you eat within the hour pre-exercise gets counted into the first hour.

 

Some popular choices include sports drink, banana, gummy candy, gels,

maple syrup, tea with honey, raisins, dates, dried pineapple, and marshmallows.

Clearly, some choices offer more vitamins and minerals than others,

but all will do the job of providing energy.

 

Some athletes have intestinal issues and prefer to abstain

from food and fluids before and during exercise. If that’s why

you choose to train on “empty,” you should know that just

rinsing your mouth with a sports drink can reduce the perception

of fatigue and improve performance by 3%.

 

The next time your stomach can’t handle anything and you are about to hit the wall,

try swishing and spitting?

 

Fuel well and have fun,

Nancy

 

For more information on fueling before, during and afterexercise, refer to:

Nancy Clark’s Sports Nutrition Guidebook

Food Guide for Marathoners

Cyclist’s Food Guide.

1,308 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: nancy_clark, sports_nutrition_guidebook, fueling_duriing_exercise, eating_for_endurance, swish_sports_drink, swish_and_spit
Q. How important are carbohydrates vs. proteins for runners?
Today's literature seems to say all sorts of things?
 
A. Runners (and all athletes) need carbs to fuel the muscles (and the brain) 
and protein to build and repair muscles. Carbs and protein do different jobs 
in the body so we need to consume both. 

All carbs (fruits, veggies, grains and sugars) digest into glucose, the fuel 
preferred by the brain. If you have low blood glucose, you’ll feel lightheaded 
and dizzy. No need to get to that point with proper fueling 
(plus being light-headedis no fun)!
 
 
Your body needs more calories from carbs than protein: 
--about 2 to 5 grams carb per pound of body weight 
  (depending on how active you are) 
--about 0.5 to 0.9 grams protein per pound 
  (depending if you are a fully-muscled adult or a growing teenager).
 
Rather than get caught up in numbers, just be sure to have wholesome grains, 
fruits and veggies as the foundation of each meal (two-thirds of the plate), 
with some protein as the accompaniment. You’ll end up with the right balance. 

But if you have just a protein shake, let’s say for a recovery food, 
you will lack the carbs needed to refuel the muscles. Make that protein 
shake into a carb-protein fruit smoothie! 
Or if you have a chicken Caesar salad (protein and fat), be sure to have a 
whole grain bagel with it, or crackers, or add some rice to the salad. 
 
If you want more help with how to balance carbs, protein, and fat, please 
refer to my Sports Nutrition Guidebook.

 

Eat wisely, fuel well, and feel great!

 

Nancy

764 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: protein, nancy_clark, carb, sports_nutrition_guidebook, right-balance-protein-carbs, sports-diet
Nancy Clark RD CSSD

Nancy Clark RD CSSD

Member since: Jul 8, 2007

Hi! I specialize in nutrition for exercise, and help active people figure out how to manage food, weight, exercise, energy and enjoyment of eating. Let me know if you have any questions!

View Nancy Clark RD CSSD's profile