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If you train for a marathon or triathlon, surely your body fat will melt away. Correct?


Wishful thinking. If you are an endurance athlete who complains, “For all the exercise I do, I should be pencil-thin,” take a look at your 24-hour energy expenditure. Do you put most of your energy into exercising, but then tend to be quite sedentary the rest of the day as you recover from your tough workouts?

 

A study with of male endurance athletes who reported a seemingly low calorie intake indicates they did less spontaneous activity than their peers in the non-exercise parts of their day. Yes, it's really easy after a long run to lounge around and eat bon-bons because you "deserve" them...

 

Even when you are marathon training, you need to keep taking the stairs instead of the elevators, and keep moving in non-exercise parts of your day. Again, if weight is an issue, you should eat according to your whole day's activity level, not according to how hard you trained for an hour or two that day.

 

 

Happy training!

 

Nancy

 

For more info:

 

Food Guide for Marathoners: Tips for Everyday Champions

 

Thompson, J., M. Manore, J. Skinner, E. Ravussin, M. Spraul.Daily energy expenditure in male endurance athletes with differing energy intakes. Med Sci Sports Exerc27::347-54, 1995.

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This is the season when folks training for the Boston Marathon start to ramp up their runs. Having just talked this morning to a Team in Training group, I know that many runners have questions about how to best recover after runs that last longer than 12 miles.  Hence,I am reposting this blog that a student of mine wrote last year at this time.

 

Boston Marathon Bound - Recovery foods

What to eat or drink after a long run is a hot topic among runners. What you do or don’t consume can effect how you feel later in the day, as well as at your next workout.

 

Rehydrate

After a long run, your biggest priority should be to replace fluids lost from sweat. Hopefully you drank some water or sports drink on your run, but you will still need to replace some fluid. The best way to determine how much to drink is to weigh yourself before and after your run (without clothes). For every pound lost, drink at least 16 oz of water; better yet, 24 ounces. At this point, there is little need for sports drinks, as long as you’re planning to eat something shortly. Your next meal or snack will replenish the lost sodium and glucose. However, sports drinks can be a good option if your stomach isn’t ready for food. Chicken broth, cola, or gingerale are other popular options that may help settle a queasy stomach.


Remember to continue to drink fluids throughout the day to continue to stay hydrated. You can monitor your hydration by the color and amount of your urine. When properly hydrated your urine will be a pale yellow (unless you take supplements, in which case, the color may be brighter), and you will urinate every 2-3 hours.

 

Refuel

In addition to properly hydrating, you will want to eat shortly after a long run to replenish your glycogen stores. Make sure this meal or snack is a mix of carbohydrates (to refuel) with a little protein (to repair). While many runners strive for a ratio of 4 to 1 or 3 to 1 carbohydrates to protein, the exact ratio isn’t mandatory. Just be sure you fill-up with more carbs than protein. That is, don't have just a protein shake!

 

Some easy to prepare carb-protein recovery meals include:

-       Fruit smoothie made with yogurt or milk

-       Turkey sandwich with a piece of fruit

-       Yogurt with berries and granola

-       Bowl of beany soup such a minestrone, with whole grain crackers and low fat cheese

-       Oatmeal with milk, raisins, and slivered almonds

-       Peanut butter (or other nut butter) and banana sandwich

-       Vegetable omelet with toast

 

If you aren’t ready for a meal after your run, make a small snack such as a glass of chocolate milk, a bowl of cereal with milk, or an apple with peanut butter.

 

Rapidly refueling by eating immediately after a run is most important for people who will be running again in the next 4 to 6 hours. Most of us can simply eat within an hour after running and will recover well. Yet, a benefit to eating shortly after your run is to keep the cookie monster from showing up!

 

Even if your stomach doesn’t feel hungry post-run, your muscles want fuel. Feed them! Signs of hunger include irritability and fatigue. Eating even just a small snack post-run and then your meal a few hours later can keep you from becoming ravenous and overeating later in the day. You will also likely feel more energized and recover faster.

 

Happy eating and running!

 

Written by guest blogger Sarah Gold.

 

For more information:

Food Guide for Marathoners: Tips for Everyday Champions

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Being injured is one of the hardest parts of being an athlete. If and when you do get injured, you’ll likely wonder how to eat better to heal better. My motherly advice is: Don’t treat good nutrition like a fire engine!

 

Rather than shaping up your diet when you get injured,strive to maintain a high quality food intake every day. That way, you'll have a hefty bank account of vitamins and minerals stored in your liver, ready and waiting to be put into action. For example, a well-nourished athlete has enough vitamin C (important for healing) stored in the liver to last for about six weeks. The junk food junkie who gets a serious sports injury (think bike crash,skiing tumble, hockey blow) and ends up in the hospital has a big disadvantage. Eat smart every day!

 

The fear of gaining weight plagues most injured athletes.Here are two myths, debunked!

 

MYTH: Muscle turns into fat.

Wrong. If you are unable to exercise, your muscles will shrink, but they will not turn into fat. Have you ever seen the scrawny muscles on a person who has just had a cast removed when the broken bone has healed? Those muscles did not get fat!

 

MYTH: Lack of exercise means you'll get fat.

Wrong. If you overeat while you are injured (as can easily happen if you are bored or depressed), you can indeed easily get fat. I know of many frustrated athletes who have quickly gained weight because they continued to eat lumberjack portions. But if you eat mindfully, your body can regulate a proper intake. Before diving into meals and snacks, ask yourself, “How much of this fuel does my body actually need?” Eat for fuel, not entertainment.

 

When injured, some underweight athletes do gain to their genetic weight. For example, a 13-year-old gymnast perceived her body was “getting fat” while she recuperated from a knee injury. She was simply catching up and attaining the physique appropriate for her age and genetics.

 

Whatever you do, don't skimp on protein and calories when injured ... that will delay healing.

 

With best wishes for good health,

Nancy

 

For more information:

Nancy Clark's Sports Nutrition Guidebook

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Why is childhood obesity is on the rise?

Why are thin people “fatter” than they used to be?

Why is morbid obesity, type 2 diabetes—and even sex reversalis fish species—becoming common?

…Is something pervading our environment that is making us fatter?

 

Traditionally, we look at overeating and underexercising as the main contributors to the obesity epidemic. Diet and exercise are deemed to be the solutions to the problem. Maybe we are overlooking other factors? Do we need to pay attention to new research on “obesogens”?

 

Obesogens are chemical compounds found in food, drugs, and industrial products (like plastics) that may alter metabolic processes and predispose some people to gain weight. These compounds may contribute to more and bigger fat cells. Exposure to these compounds in utero may explain (in part) why childhood obesity is on the rise, why even thin people are “fatter” than they used to be, and why morbid obesity, type 2 diabetes, and sex reversal in fish species is on the rise.

 

Clearly, we need to explore all possible factors that contribute to weight issues, not just diet and exercise. Some of these factors include looking at ways to reduce potential environmental obesogens that might be in plastics, canned goods, nonstick cookware, air fresheners, laundry products, and personal care products. Obesogens may be yet another reason to eat less processed foods, particularly those that come packaged in plastic or cans. The research is in its infancy, so stay tuned—and until we know more, start eating more foods that are minimally processed!

For more information:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obesogen

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/758210

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Restricting food intake to lose weight is the common approach to becoming leaner. Yet, research consistently tells us that reducing diets are often unsuccessful and contribute to weight gain in the long run, to say nothing of depression and disordered eating behaviors. A growing body of research suggests that intuitive eating is a healthier alternative to current strategies of dieting to lose weight.

 

Intuititve eating is a sustainable approach that focuses on trusting your body to tell you how much to eat so you will stopping eating when you are full. Intuitve eaters eat for physical, not emotional, reasons.This is how normal-weight people tend to eat.

 

We were all born with the ability to eat when hugnry and stop when content. Unfortunately, our society’s food environment and lifestyle easily derail intuitive eating behaviors. We are often too busy to eat when hunger arises or fail to have food available. Many dieters even keep food “out of the house” due to lack of trust regarding their ability to stop eating when they are full. Fatigue and stress, in addition to the denial and deprivation associated with dieting, further compound the drive to overeat.

 

As a society, we need to step away from encouraging both young people and adults to diet and instead focus on—

1. teaching them how to eat mindfully (i.e., to connect with body signals: Does my body need this food?),

2. improving the food environment (such as having salad, not French fires, be the default side dish on menus), and

3. making sleep more of a priority.

As an adult, you can take steps to reclaim this innate behavior  and teach yourself how to eat intutively so you can better invest in your health and well-being.

 

For more information, enjoy reading Intuitive Eating by EvelynTribole and Elyse Resch.

 

With best wishes for a happy and healthy 2013.

 

Nancy

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   Quinoa is becoming maintream among many health-conscious athletes, many of whom are vegetarians or vegans. They may choose to eat quinoa because it is said to be a protein-rich grain. (Technically speaking, quinoa is a seed, but we eat it as a grain-food.) Quinoa is also touted as containing all the essential amino acids. 

 

But as you can see in the chart below, quinoa is not really a protein powerhouse. Be sure to eat it along with tofu, beans, yogurt or other protein-rich foods to reach the target of 20 to 30 grams protein per meal.

 

Quinoa is also expensive: $6 per pound, as compared to brown rice at $1.50 per pound.

 

Here's how some grains compare:

 

Grain

1 cup

cooked

Calories
Protein
Fiber
Iron
Pasta, white2 oz. dry2007 g2 g2 mg
--whole wheat2 oz. dry200862
Rice, white1/3 c dry225412
Rice, brown1/3 c dry225521
Quinoa1/3 c dry200853

 

 

 

If you are a quinoa consumer, please let me know your reasons for choosing quinoa.

Thanks!

1,945 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: grains, nancy_clark, quinoa, vegan_diet, vegetarian_diet

Edible seeds and nuts are not only nutritious but can add a nice crunch to yogurt, cereal, salads and casseroles. Most have a mild, and slightly nutty flavor. They are rich in polyunsaturated fats, fiber, anti-oxidants, vitamins and minerals such as Vitamin E and magnesium—but they also add calories. Dieters beware—a few tablespoons here and there of nuts and seeds from the salad bar can add another 200 to 400 calories!

 

Flax is a source of health protective ALA omega-3 fats. You need to grind the seed or else it will passwhole through your digestive tract.

Chia, like flax, is a source of ALA omega-3 fats. ALA is not as effective as fish and animal sources of omega-3, but any omega-3 is better for your health than nothing. When soaked in water for 10 minutes, chia seeds create a gel that can be used as a thickener for smoothies and as an alternative to eggs and oils in some recipes.

Sunflower seeds have a pleasing taste when added to a salad, muffins, or  cereal. Sunflower butter is a popular alternative to peanut butter, and is rich in healht-healthy polyunsaturated fats

Pumpkin seeds, also known as pepitas, have a nutrient profile similar to other seeds.

Hemp contains all the essential amino acids, adding aboost to vegan diets.

Sesame seeds have a gentle flavor. They make a nice coating for sauteed or baked chicken breasts (in place of—or in addition to—bread crumbs).

 

Here is how their nutritional value compares. Note how the calories can add up quickly. They offer some protein, but for a vegan athlete who may need at least 60 to 90 grams of protein per day, they are not a strong protein source. The same goes for calcium and iron; nuts and seeds are a source of those nutrients, but generally not a strong source -- unless you happen to enjoy lots of sesame seeds (for calcium) and chia (for iron)!

 

 

Seed

 

Serving size

 

Calories

 

Protein grams

 

Fiber grams

 

Calcium mg

 

Iron

mg

 

Comments

 

Chia

 

¼ cup (30 g)

 

140

 

5

 

10

 

180

 

8

 

Has ALA omega-3 fats

 

Flax, ground

 

¼ cup

(30 g)

 

150

 

5

 

8

 

70

 

1.5

 

Whole seeds do not get digested

 

Hemp seeds

 

¼ cup

(30 g)

 

180

 

10

 

4

 

--

 

1

 

All essential amino acids

 

Sunflower

 

¼ cup

(30 g)

 

190

 

6

 

3

 

20

 

1

 

Grind for alternative to peanut butter

 

Pumpkin

 

¼ cup

(30 g)

 

170

 

9

 

2

 

50

 

2

 

Also called pepitas

 

Sesame

 

1/4 cup (35 g)

 

200

 

6

 

4

 

350

 

 

5

 

Good source of calcium!

 

Walnuts, chopped

 

¼ cup

(30 g)

 

190

 

4

 

2

 

30

 

1

 

Has ALA omega-3 fats

 
1,502 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: nuts, chia, seeds, salad_toppings, hemp, sesame_seeds, sunflower_seeds

Are you searching for the perfect holiday gift for your teammates and exercise buddies?

Remember that active people welcome healthful food gifts, such as a baggie filled with homemade

trail mix then tied with a bow, a loaf of bread warm from the oven, a nutrition book with recipes.

 

Here’s a favorite trail mix recipe from my Sports Nutrition Guidebook, a popular gift in itself!

 

Sugar and Spice Trail Mix

This tasty pre-exercise snack is sweet, but not too sweet.

Put it in small baggies tied with a bow, and you’ll have gifts for the whole team! 

 

            3 cups oat squares cereal

            3 cups mini-pretzels, salted or salt-free, as desired

            2 tablespoons tub margarine, melted

            1 tablespoon packed brown sugar

            1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

            1 cup dried fruit bits or raisins

 

1. Preheat oven to 325°F.

2. In a large resealable plastic bag or plastic container with a

   cover, combine the oat squares and pretzels.

3. In a small microwavable bowl, melt the margarine; add the

   brown sugar and cinnamon. Mix well; pour over the cereal.

4. Seal the bag or container and shake gently until the mixture is

    well coated. Transfer to a baking sheet.

5. Bake uncovered for 15 to 20 minutes, stirring once or twice.

6. Let cool; add the dried fruit. Divide into 10 baggies.

 

Yield: 10 servings   

Total calories: 2,000

200 calories per serving; 40 g Carb; 5 g Protein; 2 g Fat

 

Recipe courtesy of the Amer. Heart Assoc. (www.deliciousdecisions.com)

 

Recommended Reading

Helpful sports nutrition books can also be a welcome gift.

Here are a few suggestions from the books that I have written :

 

Nancy Clark’s Sports Nutrition Guidebook

            The sports nutrition bible for learning how to eat to win.

The Cyclist’s Food Guide: Fueling for the Distance

            For cyclists who are doing long rides or tours.

Food Guide for Marathoners: Tips for Everyday Champions

            Perfect for novice marathoners who fear hitting the wall!

Food Guide for New Runners: Getting It Right From the Start

            For the novice runner who wants to lose weight and run well

Food Guide for Soccer: Tips and Recipes From the Pros

            Useful gift for coaches, players, and soccer parents. Yummy recipes, too!

 

With best wishes for a joyful holiday season,

Nancy

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Looking for 10 hours of continuing education credits? Keep reading!

Here’s your chance to update your sports nutrition knowledge while enjoying an information-packed workshop with two internationally known professionals:

Sports nutritionist Nancy Clark MS, RD, CSSD is respected for her skills with helping athletes and exercisers enhance their performance and achieve their desired physiques.

• Exercise physiologist WilliamEvans PhD is renown for his research on protein, exercise, and aging—plus his ability to translate that information into “how to” tips.


This 1.5-day program is designed to help both health professionals as well as serious athletes. You’ll find answers to your questions about how to--

--improve athletic performance with a winning sports diet.

--manage weight issues and resolve disordered eating practices.

—invest in lifelong health for longevity

--further your athletic and/or professional career.

Ten hours of education for ACE, AFAA, AND, ACSM, CHES, NATA, NSCA.

“I was surprised to learn new information on a topic I thought I knew so well.”

            --Registered dietitian/personal trainer, Seattle

 

Sept 20-21, 2013  NEW YORK CITY at Columbia Teacher's College

Oct 4-5   BOSTON at Yawkey Special Olympics Training Center in Marlborough

Oct 11   PROVIDENCE (Friday only) - at URI Downtown campus

 

Jan. 24-25, 2014   PHILADELPHIA atLaSalle University

Feb. 7-8    PITTSBURGH at Allegheny General Hosital Conference Center

 

ONLINE:  Every day!

You’ll listen to the speakers’ voices and see their PowerPoint presentations. Almost as good as being there in person!

 

Please visit http://www.sportsnutritionworkshop.com for more details.

 

 

NOTE: If you live near any of the workshop locations, please share this announcement with coaches, athletic trainers, personal trainers,dietitians, nutrition educators, and yes, serious athletes themselves.

2,943 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: ace, nancy_clark, acsm, sports_nutrition_workshop, nsca, ceus, nata, afaa, sports_nutrition_ceu, ches

Question:

I just finished reading an article you write about protein for athletes and you did not mention nuts at all.

I thought nuts were a good source of protein?

 

Answer:

Nuts are indeed a healthful food and offer a nice array of vitamins and minerals.

People who eats nuts (including nut butters) two or more times a week reduce

their risk of heart disease by more than 20%! And despite popular belief, nut-eaters

are not fatter than people who refrain from eating nuts.

 

That said, nuts are a good, but not great, source of protein.

Nuts are called an "incomplete" protein, because they lack

some of the essential amino acids needed to build muscles.

But you can solve that problem by eating nuts with beans/legumes,

whole grains, and dairy foods. Think toast with peanut butter and

a yogurt for breakfast. Or soynuts mixed with almonds.

 

You have to eat a lot of nuts to get a hefty dose of protein:
--2 tablespoons of peanut butter has only about 8 or 9 grams of protein.

--25 almonds (two lady-like or 1 macho handful) has only about 5 or 6 grams of protein.

 

If your goal is 20 to 30 grams of protein per meal, you'll likely want a

tall glass of milk with your PB sandwich or cottage cheese with the almonds!

Or just go nuts over nuts!

 

Nancy

 

For more protein info:

Nancy Clark's Sports Nutrition Guidebook

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         Your goal when carbo-loading is to consume about 3 to 5 grams carbohydrates per pound of body weight. Here's a 3,200-calorie menu that provides the right balance of carbs and protein. The menu is wheat-free, to show that even athletes who have celiac disease can still carbo-load!

TO track your food intake, use https//www.supertracker.usda.gov

Eat wisely and have a fun run,

Nancy

 

Breakfast

Oatmeal*, 1 cup raw, cooked in  * gluten-free brand

Milk, 16 oz

Raisins, 1.5 ox (small box)

Brown sugar, 1 Tbsp

Apple cider, 12 oz.

 

Lunch

Potato, large baked, topped with

Cottage cheese, 1 cup

Baby carrots, 8, dipped in

Hummus, 1/2 cup

Grape juice, 12 ox

 

Snack

Banan, extra large

Peanut butter, 3 Tbsp

 

Dinner

Rice, (brown or white*), 2 cups cooked  *don't eat too much fiber!

Chicken, 5 oz sauteed in

Olive oil, 2 tsp

Green beans, 1 cup

 

Dessert

Dried pineapple, 1/2 cup       

 

For more information:

Food Guide for Marathoners: Tips for Everyday Champions                                                                                                                              

2,871 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: carbohydrates, carbohydrate-loading, carb-load, marathon_menu, what_to_eat_before_a_marathon

If you are among the many people who take calcium supplements, think again. While any calcium is better than no calcium, a calcium-rich diet is the best bet for bone health. Here's some info to help you keep your skeleton strong.

 

• You have a life-long need for calcium because your bones are constantly in flux, remodeling by releasing and then redepositing calcium.

 

• After menopause, the balance between bone breakdown and formation shifts, resulting in bone loss and therisk of osteoporosis—particularly if you are not eating adequate calcium-rich foods.

 

• The body’s ability to absorb calcium declines with age. That’s explains why the recommended intake of calcium goes from 1,000 to 1,200 milligrams per day for women over 50 and men over 70. 

 

• Calcium depends on stomach acids to be absorbed, so consuming calcium as a food (as opposed to a supplement) enhances calcium absorption. Plus small doses of calcium are absorbed better than 500 mg doses. Hence, eating a calcium-rich food at each meal is preferable to the unnatural consumption of one big bolus of calcium via supplement.

 

• Yogurt (not Greek) offers more calcium ounce for ounce, than milk, plus the active cultures in yogurt increase the body’s absorption of calcium.

 

• If you are counting on spinach, collards, and Swiss chard for calcium, heads up. Those foods have a high level of oxalic acid, which binds calcium so you absorb less than the nutritional numbers promise. If you eat a wide variety of foods, this is of little significance, because the DRIs take into account dietary factors that effect absorption. But if veggies are your main calcium source, think again.

 

• Be sure to get adequate vitamin D (800 IUs daily) to make use of the calcium you consume.

 

 

For help balancing your diet with real foods: Nancy Clark's Sports Nutrition Guidebook

 

Source: Tufts Health and Nutrition Letter, October 2012.

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The ads suggest coconut water is the perfect sports drink. What do ya' think?

 

Coconut water is marketed as being “100% pure” and “all natural.” Almost true. It has only two ingredients: coconut water (the watery liquid inside a green coconut) -- but also quite a bit of vitamin C that has been added to the drink. Not "all natural."

 

Coconut water is naturally rich in potassium (good) but has a high price tag (about $3 for a 17-ounce carton; bad).

 

Here’s how it compares (in portions commonly consumed by thirsty athletes) to Gatorade and orange juice:

 

Fluid

 

Serving size

 

Calories

 

Sodium

 

Potassium

 

Vitamin C

 

Coconut Water

(2 ingredients)

 

17-oz carton

 

90

 

60

 

1030

 

350% DV

(Fortified)

 

Gatorade

(12 ingredients)

 

20-ounce bottle

 

125

 

275

 

75

 

0%

 

Orange Juice

(1 ingredient)

 

16 ounces

 

220

 

0

 

900

 

100%

 

 

Because serious athletes have a higher need for sodium than potassium during sweaty exercise (and you will simply flush the excess vitamin C down the toilet), I’d suggest you choose a higher-sodium sports drink during endurance workouts and spend your money on orange juice and other natural foods afterwards. That is, unless you happen to prefer the taste and digestibility of coconut water, which research suggests is not always the case (1)

 

For more info on what to drink, check out the Fluids chapter in my Sports Nutrition Guidebook.

 

1) Kalman, D, S Feldman, DKrieger, R Bloomer. Comparison of coconut water and a carbohydrate-electrolytesport drink on measures of hydration and physical performance inexercise-trained men. J Int Soc Sports Nutr 2012; 9:1

1,645 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: fluids, sodium, nancy_clark, potassium, sports_drink, orange_juice, coconut_water

Q. Help! What’s the solution to intestinal problems during long runs?

 

A. Upset stomachs, nausea, cramping, and urgency to take a pit stop are common problems among long distance runners. Because each person has his or her personal response to long runs, I can only ask you lots of questions, but perhaps they will help you find an answer. Here goes...

 

• Are you running too far, too fast too soon and your body is telling you it isn’t ready for that distance?

• Are you stressed and anxious on long-run days, and your nerves are creating the problem?

• Do you eat too much food the night before? If so, try having your big meal at brunch the day before and eat lighter at night.

• Do you eat too much breakfast before the long run? Try eating part of the breakfast the night before, at bedtime, so you’ll be less hungry in the morning.

• Do you eat fatty, heavy foods (like a sausage, egg ‘n cheese biscuit) before the long run?

• Do you drink too much pre-run coffee?

• What do you use for fuel during the long runs? Gels sometimes cause GI problems. So can commercial sports drinks or candies with the wrong kind of sugar for your gut.

• Are you chewing sugarless gum? The sweetener (sorbitol) can cause GI distress such as gas and diarrhea.

• Do you eat yogurt, kefir, or take probiotics? They can help resolve bowel issues.

• Do you get dehydrated? Lack of fluids contributes to diarrhea.

• Do you eat a high fiber diet? “Healthy” diets with abundant whole grains, fruits and veggies can become problematic for some runners.

• Is the problem limited to during runs or do you have intestinal issues at other times of the day? Perhaps you have latent Irritable Bowel Syndrome that gets aggravated during long runs?

• Do other people in your family have intestinal issues, like constipation, diarrhea, bloating, or colon cancer? Perhaps you have problems digesting gluten (a genetic tendency) and should be tested to see if you have Celiac Disease?

• Have you kept food logs to track potential culprits so you can pinpoint, or at least narrow down, the problem?

 

Good luck being a food detective! And don’t hesitate to seek medical advice if all of the above suggestions fail to find a solution. A consultation with a local sports dietitian for a nutrition check-up can be very helpful! See www.SCANdpg.org for a referral network.

 

Please add your comments if you have found a solution not mentioned above!

4,758 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: running, nancy_clark, pre-exercise_food, diarrhea, constipation, runner's_trots, intestinal_problems_in_runners

 

Here’s your chance to update your sports nutrition knowledge while enjoying an information-packed workshop with two internationally known professionals:

 

Sports nutritionist Nancy Clark MS, RD, CSSD is respected for her skills with helping athletes and exercisers enhance their performance and achieve their desired physiques.

 

• Exercise physiologist WilliamEvans PhD is renown for his research on protein, exercise, and aging—plus his ability to translate that information into “how to” tips.


 

This 1.5-day program is designed to help both health professionals as well as serious athletes. You’ll find answers to your questions about how to--

--improve athletic performance with a winning sports diet.

--manage weight issues and resolve disordered eating practices.

—invest in lifelong health for longevity

--further your athletic and/or professional career.

 

Ten hours of education for ACE, AFAA, AND, ACSM, CHES, NATA, NSCA.

 

“I was surprised to learn new information on a topic I thought I knew so well.”

            --Registered dietitian/personal trainer, Seattle

 

 

 

St. LOUIS:  Nov 16-17 at St. Louis University

 

CHICAGO:  Nov 30-Dec 1 at Rush University

 

COLUMBUS:  Jan 25-26, 2013 at Ohio Health Riverside Campus

 

INDIANAPOLIS:  Feb. 8-9 at National Institute for Fitness and Sport


 

ONLINE:  Every day!

You’ll listen to the speakers’ voices and see their PowerPoint presentations. Almost as good as being there in person!

 

Please visit http://www.sportsnutritionworkshop.com for more details.

 

 

NOTE: If you live near any of the workshop locations, please share this announcement with coaches, athletic trainers, personal trainers,dietitians, nutrition educators, and yes, serious athletes themselves.

1,234 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: nancy_clark, sports_nutrition_workshop, william_evans, nutrition_ceus, online_education, athletes_food
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Nancy Clark RD CSSD

Nancy Clark RD CSSD

Member since: Jul 8, 2007

Hi! I specialize in nutrition for exercise, and help active people figure out how to manage food, weight, exercise, energy and enjoyment of eating. Let me know if you have any questions!

View Nancy Clark RD CSSD's profile