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Open-Water Swimming

Posted by Active Toby Jun 13, 2007

 

To care for the tendinitis that developed in my Achilles tendon while training for a marathon, my sports medicine physician set me up with a treatment plan consisting of prescription anti-inflammatory medication, stretching and strengthening exercises. It is advised that an acute tendon injury can be cured within six weeks while chronic conditions take up to 8 to 10 months to heal.

 

 

With conservative treatment and non-impact cross-training, I hope to build upon the cardiovascular base that I developed while marathon training. This will allow my Achilles to repair while preparing for my first triathlon.

 

 

With that said I’ve decided that the Bulldog 50K Ultra Run will be too much too soon so I scratched it from the list and now have my sights set on the 5th Annual Lake Arrowhead Triathlon on August 18. This sprint-distance race stood out because it represents a S.M.A.R.T goal at this stage in my rehabilitation process.

 

 

[S.M.A.R.T goal|http://active.typepad.com/.shared/image.html?/photos/uncategorized/2007/06/13/openwaterswim.jpg]Next week, I’ll be training in the ocean with an open-water swim. I grew up a fresh water swimmer and gym-pool swimmer, so I lack an abundance of experience with the intricacies of open-water swimming. After reading Rachel Cosgrove’s article, Survive the surf: Entrances and exits in open water swims, I realized that swimming in the ocean is more hazardous than swimming in a pool. I feel confident in pursuit of my latest endeavor after gaining a better understanding of the imminent risks. Since Cosgrove is a USAT Level 1 certified triathlon coach, her explanation of basic techniques are helpful for both training swims as well as race situations.

 

 

Safety first, fun a close second.

 

 

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