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To limit the amount of confusion concerning the new vision requirements for

 

 

the ATF/SO program, the following information is provided.

 

 

 

 

 

Effective date for all new SO contracts/reclasses:  19 February 2009

 

 

 

 

 

All new SO candidates are now required to meet the requirements as set forth:

 

 

 

 

 

Worst eye no greater/worse than 20/70

 

 

Best eye no greater/worse than 20/40

 

 

 

 

 

Both eyes must be correctable to 20/25 or better.

 

 

 

 

 

This policy is not retroactive, so no scrubs of the dep pool are required,

 

 

applicants qualified and contracted under the old eyesight requirements are

 

 

still qualified i.e. anyone with a SO contract dated on or before 18 FEB 09

 

 

is exempt from the new eyesight requirement.

 

 

 

 

 

The new eyesight standard, determined by SPECIAL WARFARE Community and

 

 

Special Warfare Center, ensures that candidates arriving at the NSWC (BUDS)

 

 

are able to immediately begin training safely.

 

 

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A glimpse of the world of ordinary men doing extraordinary things:

 

 

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123085828475347775.html

 

Let's Be Worthy of Their Sacrifice

'The wounds I received I got in a job I love.'

 

By KARL ROVE  The Wall Street Journal

 

 

This holiday season, home in Texas and surrounded by close friends and family, I often found myself thinking about virtual strangers.

 

 

Corbis

 

 

A Navy Seal at work in Afghanistan.

 

 

I met them this fall when I spoke at the Naval Special Warfare Foundation (NSWF) dinner. The NSWF supports naval commandoes with scholarships and assistance for families of Navy Seals killed or wounded in combat or training.

 

 

During my White House years, I came to know of the heroic actions of the Seals and other special operators in the global war on terror. These men willingly follow evil into dark and perilous places. They volunteered to be on the front edge of the conflict whose outcome will shape this century.

 

 

The highlight of the NSWF dinner was a video of "snatch and grab" operations in Afghanistan. It showed helicopters lifting off to pounding music, night footage of Seals jumping onto roofs and rappelling into dusty fields, the breathtakingly destructive power of American missiles and machine guns, and compound doors blowing open and terrorist suspects being rounded up.

 

 

The Seals who prepared the video had carefully mined President Bush's speeches, using his voice and words as narration. I was touched by this and knew the president would be, too. So when I met the Seal who'd produced the video, we exchanged email addresses. Later, before he left for Afghanistan for his umpteenth deployment, I asked for a copy of the video to show the president.

 

 

He was happy to supply one but had a request in return. Could the wives and children of his unit's members see the White House Christmas decorations while their husbands and fathers were deployed?

 

 

The First Lady readily agreed and with NSWF's help, 75 Seal family members were greeted at the White House just before Christmas by the president and Laura Bush. It was one of the high points of Mr. Bush's last holiday in Washington.

 

 

On Christmas Eve, I received an email from Afghanistan, with thanks for helping to facilitate the tour. Attached was a picture of the videographer and his team, ready for that night's mission. Bearded and scruffy, covered with weapons and standing in a rude shelter, they were all wearing bright red Santa Claus hats. It was the best gift I received this Christmas.

 

 

I met another Seal at that NSWF dinner. He'd been shot eight times in Iraq and had undergone nearly two-dozen operations. One bullet had taken off part of his cheek and nose. He was destined for reconstructive surgery in a few days.

 

 

Yet he didn't feel sorry for himself. He was full of charisma, confidence, cockiness and joy. After all, he confided, when you're a wounded Seal, the world's best doctors want to operate on you so they can brag about it. Besides, he explained, he was just showing that a Seal really could catch bullets with his teeth.

 

 

He said that after a couple more procedures, he'd "be back in the game." I asked what he meant. He was amused and said he was going back into action. "My team needs me," he said before letting out a laugh. But you knew he meant it, and you knew his team did need him.

 

 

He went off to get a drink for his wife. I didn't want to pry, but I asked her how she felt about him going back into action. She said she was all for it because that's what he was made for. I had to fight back tears.

 

 

The next day, I got an email from the retired Navy Seal buddy who'd talked me into speaking at NSWF. He shared a picture of the sign the wounded Seal put on his Baghdad hospital door.On it, the Seal had scrawled that visitors shouldn't "feel sorry" for him. "The wounds I received," he wrote, "I got in a job I love, doing it for people I love, supporting the freedom of a country I deeply love. I am incredibly tough." And on his sign he promised "a full recovery" and wrote that his hospital room was a place of "fun, optimism, and intense rapid regrowth. If you are not prepared for that, GO ELSEWHERE." He signed it "The Management."

 

 

I keep this picture with me so I think every day about those I met this fall. And I thought about them often during the holidays.

 

 

When I did, I felt awe that such men and women exist, and gratitude that they put themselves in harm's way for our nation. I hope America continues to be worthy of such staggering service and sacrifice.

 

 

May the New Year bring safety to all who wear our country's uniform, success in the missions they so passionately believe in, peace and comfort to their families, and reunion with all whom they love.

 

 

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Broncos Train With Navy SEALs

(IDAHO STATESMAN 22 DEC 08) ... Chadd Cripe

 

Boise State football coach Chris Petersen took his redshirt players to a Navy training base Monday morning for a taste of life as a SEAL.

 

About 25 Broncos went through a 45-minute training session at Naval Base Coronado on Coronado Island, not far from the team hotel.

 

"It was very quiet going over," Petersen said. "Coming back, they were very proud of themselves that they survived the 45 minutes that those guys do daily."

 

The workout started with the SEALs sending the players into the chilly waters of the Pacific Ocean, then rolling them in sand. After that, the group did pushups, situps and other exercises on the blacktop.

 

"It was a piece of what those guys do for six months all day long," said Petersen, who rode with the Blue Angels in July. "I think it puts things in perspective when we think we work really hard. That's a whole different level."

 

The workouts were at 7 a.m. Petersen compared it to the football team's 5:45 a.m. workouts during winter conditioning.

 

"It's equivalent to kind of our 5:45 training," he said, "but you know it's six months, it's more intense, it's longer, it just really tells you how many special people there are in this country to have the mental toughness to go through that - the love of this country, to fight for us."

 

Petersen arranged the workout through the Navy. The guys who will play in Tuesday's Poinsettia Bowl did not participate.

 

"I think they see about 25 possible Navy SEALs," Petersen said of the Navy. "Well, take out the linemen, because they wouldn't do so well, but a lot of guys that might be candidates down the road."

 

Petersen said he hasn't lost any players to discipline or academics during bowl week. However, Boise State still is collecting grades for the players.

 

"Our guys have worked very hard and we just think it's going to work out in a positive way for us," Petersen said.

 

###

 

Check out some video from their morning PT at BUD/S:

http://www.broncosports.com/newMediaPlayer/console.htm?type=vod&oemid=9900&id=358164

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The Navy SEAL & SWCC Scout Team is on Facebook! Join the U.S. Navy SEALs - Official Facebook Page today, and interact online with other aspiring SEAL and SWCC candidates, mentors and Scout Team personnel!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Naval-Special-Warfare-Recruiting-Directorate-Coronado-CA/US-Navy-SEALs-Official-Page/35414584488

520 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: training, running, seal, swcc, navy_seal, naval_special_warfare, special_forces, facebook, flickr, special_ops, united_states_navy

 

Naval Special Warfare Preparatory School

 

 

Naval Training Center, Great Lakes, IL

 

 

 

 

 

            The Naval Special Warfare Preparatory School (NSWPS), was established to prepare potential BUD/S candidates for the arduous journey they are about to endure.  Candidates will find their time here both challenging and rewarding.  While, success at BUD/S is by no means guaranteed, graduation from NSWPS ensures that they have been given the opportunity to become physically and mentally prepared to take on the challenge that is BUD/S.

 

 

            The course is 4 - 12 weeks in duration.  This is based on BUD/S class start date, travel and candidate performance.  Below is the standard 8 week curriculum:

 

 

 

 

 

Monday, Wednesday & Friday

 

 

Running and Swimming

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday & Thursday

 

 

Swimming, Strength and Conditioning

 

 

 

 

 

            SEAL Contract candidates are required to attend 29 conditioning training evolutions while attending recruit training.  They MUST be prepared to take the Physical Screening Test (PST) the day after checking into NSWPS.  Candidates should strive to exceed the minimum PST requirements.  If the candidate doesn't meet the PST requirements, they will receive a Performance Board and risk loosing their SEAL contract.

 

 

 

 

Upon completion of the Naval Special Warfare Preparatory School, candidates will depart Naval Training Center Great Lakes, IL to Naval Special Warfare Center Coronado, CA.  All transportation will be provided.

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Check it out, here is the link to the article

 

 

http://www.runnersworld.com/article/0,7120,s6-243-408--12944-0,00.html

 

 

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BASIC UNDERWATER DEMOLITION/SEAL (BUD/S)

 

SPECIAL WARFARE COMBATANT-CRAFT CREWMAN (SWCC)

 

 

PRE-TRAINEE PROGRAM

 

 

NAVAL SPECIAL WARFARE ADVANCED TRAINING COMMAND CORNADO

 

 

BUD/S & SWCC training are very physically and mentally challenging courses of instruction, which are designed to screen and prepare candidates for the extremely rigorous environment of Naval Special Warfare Operations. The Naval Special Warfare Center Advanced Training Command BUD/S & SWCC Pre-Trainee program was established to prepare potential candidates for the demands of BUD/S, and to also assist prospective candidates applying for the Special Warfare Combatant-craft Crewman (SWCC) program. The Trainees will learn basic and advanced skills on swimming, running, calisthenics, strengthening exercises, and other basic SEAL and SWCC skills. They are closely monitored by qualified NSW instructors who will mentor them on the core requirements of Naval Special Warfare candidates. Trainees will be expected to maintain a positive mental attitude, good military bearing, professionalism and NAVY pride: anything less could constitute a termination of their TRAINEE status. This volunteer program is very challenging and only highly motivated individuals seeking a CAREER in Naval Special Warfare are encouraged to participate.

 

 

 

 

 

 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Go to website and complete NC work sheet with Career Counselor. (http://www.seal.navy.mil/ or http://www.swcc.navy.mil/)

  • No-Cost TDY/TAD orders for 30 days minimum to NSW ATC Coronado, UIC (45004)

  • Under 30 days TDY (case by case basis)

  • Ensure you call NSW ATC San Diego prior to the start of your TDY so we have notification of your arrival.

  • Must have taken Physical Screening Test, passing score is not mandatory.

  • Secret clearance (or interim clearance)

  • (2) pairs BDU pants

  • (2) white T-Shirts

  • (Last name stenciled front & back chest level)

  • Running shoes

  • Boots (Black Bates-light or equivalent, NO Steel toe)

  • Swim Trunks/Running Shorts (Black)

  • Medical Record

  • Must have current Preventive Heath Assessment IAW SECNAVINST 6120.3

  • Must be fit for full duty and have passed latest PRT

 

 

 

 

Additional details on the program and gear requirements can be directed to SOCS (SEAL) Boychuk at (619)424-6251, or Advanced Training Command Operations Department at (619)628-1968.

 

 

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This article was in the first issue of

 

 

NSW ETHOS magazine under Honoring Our Heroes

 

 

By MC2 Christopher Menzie

 

 

 

 

 

          PHOOOOOOOM!!!

 

 

            Lt. Seth Stone paused, thinking the thundering sound he heard was a mortar landing in the distance. Then the Navy SEAL heard something else coming from his radio: the sound of pain.

 

 

            It was his men, and they were in trouble.

 

 

            "Grab a rifle, and let's get out of here right now!" he instructed his team of SEALs and support personnel. Stone and his men dropped their extra gear and raced down from the sniper post they had been using to protect coalition forces on the street below.

 

 

            They pressed forward on the dusty path toward the source of the explosion. The team split up into two elements. While one laid covering fire toward hostile Iraqi insurgents, the other inched closer to the building where Stone's sniper over watch team was positioned. Switching roles, they steadily advanced toward the bullet-ridden Stone building where the other SEALs were known to have set up a sniper over watch.

 

 

            Stone booted the door open and raced up the staircase to find a scene of chaos. Sprawled out along the floor, his fellow SEALs lay bleeding and incoherent. He saw petty officer Michael Monsoor, and understood what happened.

 

 

            The 25 year old SEAL assault weapons gunner had used his body to shield the blast, protecting his teammates from an enemy grenade.

 

 

            Three SEALs and three Iraqi army soldiers were saved as a result of Monsoor's actions. He was awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously April 8 at a whit house ceremony.

 

 

            President George W. Bush, fighting back tears, presented Monsoor's parents with the medal in front of 250 guests.

 

 

            "The medal of honor is awarded for an act of such courage that no one could rightly be expected to undertake it," the president said during the ceremony. "Yet those who knew Michael Monsoor were not surprised when he did."

 

 

            Several SEALs who knew Monsoor said he stood out for his silent, professional attitude on and off the battlefield.

 

 

            "He was a tough guy all around," remarked Special Warfare Operator 1st class (SEAL) Tom Deshazo. "He never complained about anything. Most team guys don't complain about anything so for him to stand out in that regard, he was exceptional warrior."

 

 

            Monsoor often carried a rucksack loaded with communications equipment in addition to his assault weapon and ammunition, collectively weighing more than 100 pounds.

 

 

            "He had no attitude or ego that prevented him from doing exactly what I needed him to do at the precise moment I needed him to do it," remembers Stone. "Those flaws that some of us have with ego, he didn't have. So when it came time for someone to help an injured SEAL on the streets of Ramadi, he was the man to do it."

 

 

            On May 9, 2006 Monsoor and a team of SEALs were providing security for an Iraqi army brigade and came under automatic weapons fire, resulting in the wounding of a SEAL. Monsoor responded with a withering hail of machine gun fire toward his enemy while dragging the injured SEAL to safety. Monsoor was awarded the Silver Star medal for his courageous actions.

 

 

            Months later, the recovered SEAL had a dream in which he envisioned Monsoor coming to rescue him with a pair of angel's wings. Inspired by this vision, he had an image of the man who saved his life tattooed to his side. Inked in black is the vigilant Michael Monsoor with a pair of angelic wings, holding a machine gun and a prayer to saint Michael scrolled beside his image. Monsoor saved his fellow SEALs on the feast day of Saint Michael, Sept 29, 2006.

 

 

            According to Stone, several of his men also have tattoos of Monsoor in commemoration for the man so fondly remembered by the SEALs.

 

 

            "He was the ultimate teammate," commented Capt. Collin Green, who served as the commanding officer of Monsoor's SEAL team. "He had passion for his work, was loved and respected by his teammates and lived life to its fullest."

 

 

            "Monsoor's selfless desire to protect his men at any cost says something about the way he was and the way SEALs are trained," said Stone. "It's something we learn during Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL School. We lay out lives down to some extent for our teammates, whether it's by helping them out in the surf zone, or talking them out of wanting to quit. Training gears our men to think and act in this manner, period."

 

 

            Monsoor is remembered not just by the SEALs, but by the men who knew and worked with him. Army soldiers in Ramadi who had served with Michael hosted a memorial service in his honor and were present at the White House ceremony in support of the SEALs and Monsoor family. Iraqi military scouts who Monsoor helped train, sent their flag to the fallen SEAL's parents. Part of SEAL Team Three's new quarterdeck was dedicated in honor of Monsoor. His combat gear from Iraq stands encased on display.

 

 

            At the White House, the president noted, "during his funeral, SEALs who passed by Monsoor's coffin, stabbed their trident warfare pins into the wood. By the end, the simple wooden box became a gold plated memorial to the man who meant the world to some of the toughest men on earth."

 

 

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SWCC CREED

Posted by SEAL-SWCC Instructor Jun 12, 2008

SPECIAL WARFARE COMBATANT-CRAFT CREWMAN CREED

In our nation's time of need, an elite brotherhood

Of sailors stands ready off distant shores and on shallow rivers. Defending freedom, they serve with honor and distinction. I am proud to be one of these sailors.

I am a special warfare combatant-craft crewman: A quiet professional; Tried, tested, and dedicated to achieving excellence in maritime special operations. I am disciplined, confident and highly motivated warrior.

My honor and integrity are beyond reproach, my commitment unquestioned and my word trusted. The american people depend on me to carry out my mission in a professional manner.

I maintain my Craft, Equipment and myself at the highest level of combat readiness. I set the standard and lead by example. I am responsible for my actions and accountable to my teammates. I challenge my brothers to perform, as i expect them to challenge me.

I am ready for war. I will close and engage the Enemy with the full combat power of my craft. My actions will be decisive yet measured. I will always complete the mission. I will never Quit and I will leave no one behind.

My heritage comes from sailors who operated the PT boats of WWII and the combatant craft of vietnam. The legacy of these warriors guides my actions. I will always remember the courage perseverance and sacrifices made to guarantee our nation's freedom. I uphold the honor of those who have fought before me and will do nothing to disgrace my proud heritage.

 

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SWCC CREED

Posted by SEAL-SWCC Instructor Jun 11, 2008

SPECIAL WARFARE COMBATANT-CRAFT CREWMAN CREED

 

 

 

In our nation's time of need, an elite brotherhood

Of sailors stands ready off distant shores and on shallow rivers. Defending freedom, they serve with honor and distinction. I am proud to be one of these sailors.

I am a special warfare combatant-craft crewman: A quiet professional; Tried, tested, and dedicated to achieving excellence in maritime special operations. I am disciplined, confident and highly motivated warrior.

My honor and integrity are beyond reproach, my commitment unquestioned and my word trusted. The american people depend on me to carry out my mission in a professional manner.

I maintain my Craft, Equipment and myself at the highest level of combat readiness. I set the standard and lead by example. I am responsible for my actions and accountable to my teammates. I challenge my brothers to perform, as i expect them to challenge me.

I am ready for war. I will close and engage the Enemy with the full combat power of my craft. My actions will be decisive yet measured. I will always complete the mission. I will never Quit and I will leave no one behind.

My heritage comes from sailors who operated the PT boats of WWII and the combatant craft of vietnam. The legacy of these warriors guides my actions. I will always remember the courage perseverance and sacrifices made to guarantee our nation's freedom. I uphold the honor of those who have fought before me and will do nothing to disgrace my proud heritage.

 

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