Skip navigation

NEED HELP?|

Sports Are 80 Percent Mental

3 Posts tagged with the fitness tag

!http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_3b3RMRFwqU0/SlqgCQ-CyQI/AAAAAAAAA4A/h-NPbRqtWtQ/s400/exercise+workout.jpg|src=http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_3b3RMRFwqU0/SlqgCQ-CyQI/AAAAAAAAA4A/h-NPbRqtWtQ/s400/exercise+workout.jpg|border=0!</div>

After an hour of sweating on the treadmill or pumping iron, most of us look forward to the extra post-exercise "afterburn" of fat cells that has been promised to us by fitness pundits. This 24-hour period of altered metabolism is supposed to help with our overall weight loss. 

Unfortunately, a recent study found this to be a myth for moderate exercisers.

 

The new research clarifies a misunderstanding that exercisers can ignore their diet after a workout because their metabolism is in this super active state.

 

"It's not that exercise doesn't burn fat," said Edward Melanson, associate professor of medicine at the University of Colorado, "It's just that we replace the calories. People think they have a license to eat whatever they want, and our research shows that is definitely not the case. You can easily undo what you set out to do.”

 

The findings were detailed in the April edition of Exercise and Sport Sciences Review.

 

What does happen


Melanson and his team set out to measure whether people were able to burn more calories for the 24 hours after a workout compared to a day with no exercise. Their test groups, totaling 65 volunteers, included a mix of lean vs. obese and active vs. sedentary people.

On exercise days, they rode stationary bikes until they had burned 400 calories. Their pre and post exercise diet was controlled.

Throughout the groups, there was no difference in the amount of fat burned in the 24-hour period either with or without exercise.  Of course, during the exercise plenty of calories were being burned and that's the formula that Melanson would like us to remember.  "If you are using exercise to lose body weight or body fat, you have to consider how many calories you are expending and how many you are taking in," Melanson recently told WebMd. The daily energy balance or "calories in vs. calories out" is the most reliable equation for long-term weight loss.

While the current research focused on the moderate activity levels of most people, the researchers admitted they still need to examine the effect of higher intensity workouts and multiple consecutive days of exercise.

They are clear on their current message. "We suggest that it is time to put the myth that low intensity exercise promotes a greater fat burn to rest," Melanson writes. "Clearly, exercise intensity does not have an effect on daily fat balance, if intake is unchanged."

!http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_3b3RMRFwqU0/SlqhrnZPX8I/AAAAAAAAA4I/CuA5gFU5SME/s200/weight-training.jpg|src=http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_3b3RMRFwqU0/SlqhrnZPX8I/AAAAAAAAA4I/CuA5gFU5SME/s200/weight-training.jpg|border=0!

Type of workout

So, how about a weight resistance training program mixed in with cardio work?  Another fitness industry claim is that more muscle mass on your frame will raise your metabolism rate, even while sitting on the couch.

 

The same study, using the same test groups, found the post-exercise rate of calorie burn did not change on days of lifting versus no lifting. It is true that a pound of muscle burns seven to ten calories per day versus only two calories per day for a pound of fat. However, the average adult just doesn't put on enough lean muscle mass to make this difference significant.

 

While this research dispels one myth about exercise, there is still overwhelming evidence of the benefits of movement when combined with your eating habits. So, before eating that double cheeseburger and fries, you might want to do some math to figure out how many stairs you'll have to climb to break even.

 

 

Please visit my other sports science articles at Sports Are 80 Percent Mental </b>

388 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: training, running, fitness, evidence_based_coaching, sports_science

!http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_3b3RMRFwqU0/SjbZstqaPwI/AAAAAAAAArs/0sO5iNgvIEc/s400/kidsplaying.jpg|src=http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_3b3RMRFwqU0/SjbZstqaPwI/AAAAAAAAArs/0sO5iNgvIEc/s400/kidsplaying.jpg|border=0!</div>

As usual, your Mom was right. When she told you to get outside and play, she instinctively knew that would be good for you.

 

Researchers at the University of Exeter have found that kids' natural short bursts of play energy contribute just as much to a healthy lifestyle as longer bouts of organized exercise, such as gym class.

As of 2008, 32 percent of U.S. children were overweight or obese, as measured by their body mass index. While many organized programs have studied this epidemic, the prescription remains the same: less food, more exercise.

 

In fact, a previous study of 133 children found that the physical activity of the obese children over a three-week period was 35 prcent less during school days and 65 percent less on weekends compared to the children who were within accepted healthy weight norms.

 

In the new study, Michelle Stone and Roger Eston of Exeter's School of Sport and Health Sciences measured the activity level of 47 boys aged between 8 and 10 over seven days using an accelerometer strapped to each boy's hip (similar to the one inside your iPhone or Wii controller that senses motion).

The key was to find a model that would record the shortest bursts of energy, sometimes less than 2 seconds. As any boy's parents know, those spurts can happen all afternoon, whether it be chasing the dog, throwing rocks in the lake or climbing a tree.

 

The researchers also measured waist circumference, aerobic fitness and blood pressure of each boy. They found that even though their activity levels came in many short chunks, their health indicators were all in the normal range.

 

Stone explains their conclusion, "Our study suggests that physical activity is associated with health, irrespective of whether it is accumulated in short bursts or long bouts. Previous research has shown that children are more naturally inclined to engage in short bursts of running, jumping and playing with a ball, and do not tend to sustain bouts of exercise lasting five or more minutes. This is especially true for activities that are more vigorous in nature.

 

Their findings are in the April edition of the International Journal of Pediatric Obesity.

 

The researchers admit that more research is needed to measure long-term effects on health.  Establishing activity guidelines for parents and schools will help the kids plan time to move each day.

 

!http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_3b3RMRFwqU0/SjbZ8_Lq2NI/AAAAAAAAAr0/lB7ZNUeWdCE/s200/Play60.jpg|src=http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_3b3RMRFwqU0/SjbZ8_Lq2NI/AAAAAAAAAr0/lB7ZNUeWdCE/s200/Play60.jpg|border=0!</div>

The National Football League has even started a program called NFL Play 60 that encourages kids to move for at least 60 minutes each day.  "Our players know the importance of staying healthy and it’s important that young fans also understand the value of exercise," said NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell. "Play 60 is an important tool in ensuring children get their necessary daily physical activity as recommended by health and fitness experts."

 

So, more recess and less physical education in our schools? Maybe, according to Stone, "If future research backs up our findings, we would do better to encourage young children to do what they do naturally, rather than trying to enforce long exercise sessions on them. This could be a useful way of improving enjoyment and sustainability of healthy physical activity levels in childhood."

 

Please visit my other sports science articles at Sports Are 80 Percent Mental

432 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: fitness, sport_science, evidence_based_coaching, sports_science, youth_sports

!http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_3b3RMRFwqU0/SixzEns9r0I/AAAAAAAAArc/5r2boO1wF8k/s320/running-man-heart.jpg|src=http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_3b3RMRFwqU0/SixzEns9r0I/AAAAAAAAArc/5r2boO1wF8k/s320/running-man-heart.jpg|border=0!
Many people exercise to improve the health of their hearts. Now, researchers have found a link between your heart rate just before and during exercise and your chances of a future heart attack.
Just the thought of exercise raises your heart rate. The new study shows that how much it goes up is related to the odds of you eventually dying of a heart attack.

More than 300,000 people die each year from sudden cardiac arrest in the U.S., often with no known risk factors. Being able to find early warning signs has been the goal of researchers like Professor Xavier Jouven, of the Hopital Européen Georges Pompidou in Paris.

Jouven's team has been examining data from a study of 7,746 French men employed by the Paris Civil Service and given health examinations between 1967-1972, including exercise tests, electrocardiograms and heart rate measurements. Over an average 23-year follow-up, 83 eventually died of heart attacks, also known as sudden cardiac death (SCD).

In 2005, Jouven's team first showed that how a heart behaves before, during and after exercise could predict future problems. The risk of a future heart attack was about four times higher than normal in men whose resting hearts beat faster than 75 beats per minute (bpm) or did not speed up by more than 89 beats during exercise. Likewise, heart attacks were twice as likely in men whose heart rates didn't slow down more than 25 beats in the first minute after exercise stopped.

Just a thought

In the latest study, published last week in the European Heart Journal, the French researchers found another interesting clue in the same data set. Not only was the resting heart rate of each person taken, but also another reading right before they were to start a strenuous exercise bike test. This rate is affected by what they called "mild mental stress." It measures the body's physiological anticipation of exercise .

 

Think of this type of stress as the brain's warning to the body that some difficult, sweaty work is about to begin. It is normal for this rate to be slightly higher than the resting rate, but for some it is significantly higher.

 

The men who had the highest increase in heart rate during this period (increasing by more than 12 beats a minute) had twice the risk of eventual future sudden cardiac death compared to men who had the lowest increase in heart rate (an increase of less than four beats a minute).

 

So, the high-risk heart overreacts to the anticipation of exercise, and then does not respond to the full extent needed during exercise. Afterwards, it does not regulate itself down fast enough.

 

What's going on

Jouven hypothesized that the autonomic nervous system (ANS), the body's internal control governor, must be out of whack.

 

!http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_3b3RMRFwqU0/Six0njRi5kI/AAAAAAAAArk/ETSL44_ynGQ/s400/autonomic_nervous_system.jpg|src=http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_3b3RMRFwqU0/Six0njRi5kI/AAAAAAAAArk/ETSL44_ynGQ/s400/autonomic_nervous_system.jpg|border=0! The ANS has two parts, the sympathetic and the parasympathetic. Joeven suggests we think of the sympathetic system as the accelerator that turns up our response to exercise by increasing our heart rate. Putting the brakes on this acceleration are the vagus nerves, part of the parasympathetic system, preventing our heart from running out of control.

 

"There is a balance between the accelerator (sympathetic activation) and the brake (vagus nerve activation)," Jouven explains. "During an ischemic episode, when blood flow to the heart is reduced, sympathetic activation occurs to counteract it. However, if there is no protection by the vagal tone (the brake), the activation can become uncontrolled and then it becomes dangerous."

 

Finding this connection between heart rate and future heart problems is encouraging for future research, according to Jouven.

 

"These findings may carry significant clinical implications," he said. "Few measurements in medicine are as inexpensive and as easy to obtain in large general populations as to measure the heart rate difference between resting and being ready to perform an exercise test. The results will contribute towards a better understanding of the mechanisms of cardiac death."

 

Please visit my other sports science articles at Sports Are 80 Percent Mental .</b>

350 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: running, fitness, sport_science, sports_science, sports_medicine


Dan Peterson

Dan Peterson

Member since: Oct 1, 2007

A Look Inside the Mind of the Athlete - You can find a mix of sport science, cognitive science, coaching and performance stories here as I focus on the "thinking" side of sports. My "home" is at http://blog.80percentmental.com. Thanks for stopping by!

View Dan Peterson's profile

Recent Comments

No recent comments.