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Sports Are 80 Percent Mental

2 Posts tagged with the tiger_woods tag

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As first seen on LiveScience.com
and Sports Are 80 Percent Mental


 




When it comes to improving your golf game, you can spend thousands of dollars buying the latest titanium-induced, Tiger-promoted golf clubs; taking private lessons from the local "I used to be on the Tour" pro; or trying every slice-correcting, swing-speed-estimating, GPS-distance-guessing gadget. But, in the end, it’s about getting that little white sphere to go where you intended it to go. Don't worry, there are many very smart people trying to help you by designing the ultimate golf ball. Of course, they are also after a slice of this billion dollar industry, as any technological advancement that can grab a few more market share points is worth the investment.




In fact, the golf ball wars can get nasty. Earlier this month, Callaway Golf won a court order permanently halting sales of the industry's leading ball, Titleist's Pro V1, arguing patent infringements involving its solid core technology which Callaway acquired when it bought Spaulding/Top Flite in 2003. Titleist disagrees with the decision and will appeal, but in the meantime has altered its manufacturing process so that the patents in question are not used.






The challenge for golf ball manufacturers is to design a better performing ball within the constraints set by United States Golf Association. The USGA enforces limits on the size, weight and initial performance characteristics in an attempt to keep the playing field somewhat level. Every "sanctioned" golf ball must weigh less than 1.62 ounces with a diameter smaller than 1.68 inches. It also must have a similar initial velocity when hit with a metal striker, and rebound at the same angle and speed when hit against a metal block. So, what is left to tinker with? Manufacturers have focused on the internal materials in the ball and its cover design.






Today's balls have 2, 3 or 4 layers of different internal polymer materials to be able to respond differently when hit with a driver versus, say, a wedge. When hit with a driver at much higher swing speed, the energy transfer goes all the way to the core by compressing ball, reducing backspin. During a slower swing with a club that has more angle loft, the energy stays closer to the surface of the ball and allows the grooves of the club to grab onto the ball's cover producing more spin. When driving the ball off of the tee, the preference is more distance and less loft, so a lower backspin is required. For closer shots, more backspin and control are needed.






The Science of Dimples



!http://drp2010.googlepages.com/golfballairflow.jpg|height=200|width=169|src=http://drp2010.googlepages.com/golfballairflow.jpg|border=0!Which brings us to the cover of the ball and all of the design possibilities. Two forces affect the flight and distance of flying spheres, gravity and aerodynamics. Eventually, gravity wins once the momentum of the ball is slowed by the aerodynamic drag. Since all golf clubs have some angular loft to their clubface, the struck ball will have backspin. As explained by the Magnus Force effect, the air pressure will be lower on the top of the ball since that side is moving slower relative to the air around it. This creates lift as the ball will go in the direction of the lower air pressure. Counteracting this lift is the friction or drag the ball experiences while flying through the air.

Think about a boat moving through water. At the front of the boat, the water moves smoothly around the sides of the boat, but eventually separates from the boat on the back side. This leaves behind a turbulent wake where the water is agitated and creates a lower pressure area. The larger the wake, the more drag is created. A ball in flight has the same properties.


The secret then is how to reduce this wake behind the ball. Enter the infamous golf ball dimples. Dimples on a golf ball create a thin turbulent boundary layer of air molecules that sticks to the ball's contour longer than on a smooth ball. This allows the flowing air to follow the ball's surface farther around the back of the ball, which decreases the size of the wake. In fact, research has shown that a dimpled ball travels about twice as far as a smooth ball.










So, the design competition comes down to perfecting the dimple, since not all dimples are created equal! The number, size and shape can have a dramatic impact on performance. Typically, today's balls have 300-500 spherically shaped dimples, each with a depth of about .010 inch. However, varying just the depth by .001 inch can have dramatic effects on the ball's flight.




Regarding shape, these traditional round dimple patterns cover up to 86 percent of the surface of the golf ball. To create better coverage, Callaway Golf's HX ball uses hexagon shaped dimples that can create a denser lattice of dimples leaving fewer flat spots. Creating just the right design has traditionally been a trial-and-error process of creating a prototype then testing in a wind tunnel. This time-consuming process does not allow for the extreme fine-tuning of the variables.






Simulation Solution




At the 61st Meeting of the American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics this week in San Antonio, a team of researchers from Arizona State University and the University of Maryland is reporting new findings that may soon give golf ball manufacturers a more efficient method of testing their designs. Their research takes a different approach, using mathematical equations that model the physics of a golf ball in flight. ASU's Clinton Smith, a Ph.D. student and his advisor Kyle Squires collaborated with Nikolaos Beratlis and Elias Balaras at the University of Maryland and Masaya Tsunoda of Sumitomo Rubber Industries, Ltd. The team has been developing highly efficient algorithms and software to solve these equations on parallel supercomputers, which can reduce the simulation time from years to hours.




Now that the model and process is in place, the next step is to begin the quest for the ultimate dimple. In the meantime, when someone asks you, "What's your handicap?" you can confidently tell them, "Well, my golf ball's design does not optimize its drag coefficient which results in a lower loft and spin rate from its poor aerodynamics."

Related Articles on Sports Are 80 Percent Mental:

Putt With Your Brain - Part 2 

Putt With Your Brain - Part 1 

Does Practice Make Perfect? 

Play Better Golf By Playing Bigger Holes</div>

976 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: golf, tiger_woods, sport_science, callaway, golf_ball_dimples, livescience.com, magnus_force, titleist

!http://drp2010.googlepages.com/Tigerputting.jpg|height=200|width=139|src=http://drp2010.googlepages.com/Tigerputting.jpg|border=0!If Mark Twain thinks golf is "a good walk spoiled", then putting must be a brief pause to make you reconsider ever walking again.  With about 50% of our score being determined on the green, we are constantly in search of the "secret" to getting the little white ball to disappear into the cup.  Lucky for us, there is no shortage of really smart people also looking for the answer.  The first 8 months of 2008 have been no exception, with a golf cart full of research papers on just the topic of putting.  Is the secret in the mechanics of the putt stroke or maybe the cognitive set-up to the putt or even the golfer's psyche when stepping up to the ball?  This first post will focus on the mechanical side and then we'll follow-up next time with a look inside the golfer's mind.

 

Let's start with a tip that most golf instructors would give, "Keep your head still when you putt".  Jack Nicklaus said it in 1974, "the premier technical cause of missed putts is head movement" (from "Golf My Way") and Tiger Woods said it in 2001, "Every good putter keeps the head absolutely still from start to finish" (from "How I Play Golf").  Who would argue with the two greatest golfers of all time?  His name is Professor Timothy Lee , from McMaster University, and he wanted to test that observation.  So, he gathered two groups of golfers, amateurs with handicaps of 12-40, and professionals with scratch handicaps.  Using an infrared tracking system, his team tracked the motion of the putter head and the golfer's head during sixty putts.

 

As predicted, the amateurs' head moved back in unison with their putter head, something Lee calls an "allocentric" movement, which agrees with the advice that novice golfers move their head.  However, the expert golfers did not keep their head still, but rather moved their heads slightly in the opposite direction of the putter head.  On the backswing, the golfer's head moved slightly forward; on the forward stroke, the head moved slightly backward.  This "egocentric" movement may be the more natural response to maintain a centered, balanced stance throughout the stroke.  "The exact reasons for the opposite coordination patterns are not entirely clear," explains Lee. "However, we suspect that the duffers tend to just sway their body with the motions of the putter. In contrast, the good golfers probably are trying to maintain a stable, central body position by counteracting the destabilization caused by the putter backswing with a forward motion of the head. The direction of head motion is then reversed when the putter moves forward to strike the ball."  Does that mean that pro golfers like Tiger are not keeping their heads still?  No, just that you may not <b>have</b> to keep your head perfectly still to putt effectively.

 

So, what if you do have the bad habit of moving your head?  Just teach yourself to change your putting motion and you will be cutting strokes off of your score, right?  Well, not so fast.  Simon Jenkins of Leeds Metropolitan University tested  15 members of the PGA European Tour to see if they could break old physical habits during putting.  His team found that players who usually use shoulder movement in their putting action were not able to change their ways even when instructed to use a different motion.  Old habits die hard.

 

Let's say you do keep your head still (nice job!), but you still 3-putt most greens?  What's the next step on the road to birdie putts?  Of the three main components of a putt, (angle of the face of the putter head on contact, putting stroke path and the impact point on the putter), which has the greatest effect on success?  Back in February, Jon Karlsen of the Norwegian School of Sport Sciences in Oslo, asked 71 elite golfers (mean handicap of 1.8) to make a total of 1301 putts (why not just 1300?) from about 12 feet to find out.  His results showed that face angle was the most important (80%), followed by putter path (17%) and impact point (3%).

 

OK, forget the moving head thing and work on your putter blade angle at contact and you will be taking honors at every tee.  Wait, Jon Karlsen came back in July with an update .  This time he compared green reading, putting technique and green surface inconsistencies to see which of those variables we should discuss with our golf pro.  Forty-three expert golfers putted 50 times from varying distances.  Results showed that green reading (60%) was the most dominant factor for success with technique (34%) and green inconsistency (6%) trailing significantly.

 

!http://drp2010.googlepages.com/breakmaster.jpg|src=http://drp2010.googlepages.com/breakmaster.jpg|border=0!So, after reading all of this, all you really need is something like the BreakMaster, which will help you read the breaks and the slope to the hole!  Then, keep the putter blade square to the ball and don't move your head, at least not in an allocentric way, that is if you can break your bad habit of doing it.  No problem, right?  Well, next time we'll talk about your brain's attitude towards putting and all the ways your putt could go wrong before you even hit it!

 

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<span class="Z3988" title="ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&amp;rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Ajournal&amp;rft.jtitle=JournalofMotorBehavior&amp;rft.id=info:DOI/10.3200%2FJMBR.40.4.267-272&amp;rft.atitle=Head%E2%80%93PutterCoordinationPatternsinExpertandLessSkilledGolfers&amp;rft.date=2008&amp;rft.volume=40&amp;rft.issue=4&amp;rft.spage=267&amp;rft.epage=272&amp;rft.artnum=http%3A%2F%2Fheldref.metapress.com%2Fopenurl.asp%3Fgenre%3Darticle%26id%3Ddoi%3A10.3200%2FJMBR.40.4.267-272&amp;rft.au=TimothyD.Lee&amp;rft.au=TadaoIshikura&amp;rft.au=StefanKegel&amp;rft.au=DaveGonzalez&amp;rft.au=StevenPassmore&amp;bpr3.included=1&amp;bpr3.tags=Psychology%2CHealth%2CNeuroscience%2CCognitivePsychology%2CCognitiveNeuroscience%2C+Kinesiology"  style="font-size:130%;">Timothy D. Lee, Tadao Ishikura, Stefan Kegel, Dave Gonzalez, Steven Passmore (2008). Head–Putter Coordination Patterns in Expert and Less Skilled Golfers Journal of Motor Behavior, 40 (4), 267-272 DOI: 10.3200/JMBR.40.4.267-272

<span class="Z3988" title="ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&amp;rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Ajournal&amp;rft.jtitle=InternationalJournalofSportsScience&amp;Coaching&amp;rft.id=info:DOI/&amp;rft.atitle=CanEliteTournamentProfessionalGolfersPreventHabitualActionsinTheirPuttingActions%3F&amp;rft.date=2008&amp;rft.volume=3&amp;rft.issue=1&amp;rft.spage=117&amp;rft.epage=127&amp;rft.artnum=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ingentaconnect.com%2Fcontent%2Fmscp%2Fijssc%2F2008%2F00000003%2FA00101s1%2Fart00018&amp;rft.au=Jenkins%2CSimon&amp;bpr3.included=1&amp;bpr3.tags=Psychology%2CHealth%2CKinesiology%2CCognitive+Psychology"  style="font-size:130%;">Jenkins, Simon (2008). Can Elite Tournament Professional Golfers Prevent Habitual Actions in Their Putting Actions?  International Journal of Sports Science & Coaching, 3 (1), 117-127

<span class="Z3988" title="ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&amp;rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Ajournal&amp;rft.jtitle=JournalofSportsSciences&amp;rft.id=info:DOI/10.1080%2F02640410701530902&amp;rft.atitle=Thestrokehasonlyaminorinfluenceondirectionconsistencyingolfputtingamongeliteplayers&amp;rft.date=2007&amp;rft.volume=26&amp;rft.issue=3&amp;rft.spage=243&amp;rft.epage=250&amp;rft.artnum=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.informaworld.com%2Fopenurl%3Fgenre%3Darticle%26doi%3D10.1080%2F02640410701530902%26magic%3Dcrossref%7C%7CD404A21C5BB053405B1A640AFFD44AE3&amp;rft.au=JonKarlsen&amp;rft.au=GeraldSmith&amp;rft.au=JohnnyNilsson&amp;bpr3.included=1&amp;bpr3.tags=Psychology%2CHealth%2CKinesiology%2CCognitive+Psychology"  style="font-size:130%;">Jon Karlsen, Gerald Smith, Johnny Nilsson (2007). The stroke has only a minor influence on direction consistency in golf putting among elite players Journal of Sports Sciences, 26 (3), 243-250 DOI: 10.1080/02640410701530902 </span>

565 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: golf, tiger_woods, sport_science, science_in_sports, putting, jack_nicklaus


Dan Peterson

Dan Peterson

Member since: Oct 1, 2007

A Look Inside the Mind of the Athlete - You can find a mix of sport science, cognitive science, coaching and performance stories here as I focus on the "thinking" side of sports. My "home" is at http://blog.80percentmental.com. Thanks for stopping by!

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