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17 Posts tagged with the jon-doyle tag

Great Shoulder/Core Strengthner

Posted by Trish18 Oct 18, 2007

(Another great sports tip from guest blogger Jon Doyle of Baseball Training)

 

A few weeks ago I introduced you to the plank. Well here's another version of the plank, called the side plank, that builds helps develop shoulder and core stability...and, like the plank, you can do it while watching the playoffs. Who said watching TV wasn't active?

 

 

Place your elbow directly under your shoulder and your foot on top of you other foot. Simply raise your hip off the ground and hold for 30-60 seconds. Repeat on other side.

 

(Jon Doyle is a former NCAA All-American baseball player who now works as strength and conditioning specialist. For more tips check out www.baseballtrainingsecrets.com)

1,364 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: training, baseball, jon-doyle, side-plank

Hitting Made Simple

Posted by Trish18 Oct 3, 2007

(Another great sports tip from guest blogger Jon Doyle of Baseball Training)

 

The key to quality swing mechanics is quality work on the tee. A player should groove his swing with hundred of quality reps on the tee before he ever steps foot outside and hits live pitching. A Tee Station can easily be constructed in the garage or basement by attaching a tarp to the ceiling. Attach a pole to the bottom and it can be rolled up to the ceiling and secured with a chain when not in use.

 

The hitter should take his stance with his belt buckle in the center of the plate. The tee should be moved around to three different contact points. Contact point one is placed on the inside 1/3 of the plate, about 2 feet in front of the plate. This pitch should be pulled. Contact point two is placed down the middle and about one foot in front of the plate and hit up the middle. Contact point three is placed on the outside corner, back into the plate and driven to the opposite field.

 

One-third of the swings should be lead-hand cuts, a third should be follow-hand cuts and the final third should be two-hand cuts. When swinging with the lead or follow hand, the hitter should choke up for bat control and place the bat flat at the tip of his shoulder. Lead-hands cuts will emphasize that the swing is powered by the rotation of the hips and body not by the arms and shoulders.  I place a lot of emphasis on lead-hand cuts at contact point three because this emphasizes letting the ball get deep, staying closed and driving the ball the other way. It is easy to learn to pull the ball but hard to learn to stay back, let the ball get deep, and drive it the other way.

 

Tee work is very boring for most younger players. I told my players to envision a Major League pitcher in the tarp and pretend to be their favorite hitter. I also advise them to announce the game in order to "bring it to life." This really puts the fun in tee work and increases your child's chance of success.

 

(Jon Doyle is a former NCAA All-American baseball player who now works as strength and conditioning specialist. For more tips check out www.baseballtrainingsecrets.com)

1,730 Views 1 Comments Permalink Tags: baseball, jon-doyle, tips, hitting, drills

60 Seconds To Stronger Abs

Posted by Trish18 Sep 20, 2007

(Another great sports tip from guest blogger Jon Doyle of Baseball Training)

 

Here's a simple exercise you can do just about anywhereeven watching TVthat will strengthen your abs, and your entire core, in no time.

 

It's called the Plank and it's pictured here:

 

 

Simply hold your body off the ground and only your arms and toes are touching the ground. Be sure to keep your body parallel with the ground and do not let those hips sag. Pull your belly button in towards your spine to maintain a tight core.

 

Try to hold for at least 30 seconds and work your way all the way up to 60 seconds. Then you can try to get up to two full minutes.

 

(Jon Doyle is a former NCAA All-American baseball player who now works as strength and conditioning specialist. For more tips check out www.baseballtrainingsecrets.com)

1,628 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: training, baseball, jon-doyle, plank

(Another great sports tip from guest blogger Jon Doyle of Baseball Training)

 

Everybody has heard the term "See the ball, hit the ball." So why do most hitters, coaches and instructors ignore this critical hitting aspect?

 

This is the most basic of hitting concepts. We all spend a great deal of time and resources on the mechanics of executing a quality swing. But none of that matters if you can't see the ball. 

Your kid doesn't know if there is something wrong with his vision. He doesn't know if he needs glasses (or contacts) or if his prescription is too weak. He assumes what he sees is the way it’s supposed to look. Before you hustle him off to another pricey session with a hitting instructor, get his eyes checked.

 

And make sure that instructor spends time on baseball-specific vision training, not eye drills that make you choose a color or have you sitting down looking at a computer. That's not specific to baseball.

 

If you're not training vision in your stance, then it's not specific to the sport and it will have very little, if any, carryover to the batter’s box.

 

See the ball. Hit the ball. It’s that simple.

 

(Jon Doyle is a former NCAA All-American baseball player who now works as strength and conditioning specialist. For more tips check out www.baseballtrainingsecrets.com)

1,449 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: baseball, jon-doyle, vision, hitting

(Another great sports tip from guest blogger Jon Doyle of Baseball Training )

 

If you’ve watched any of the Little League World Series you’ve certainly noticed how hard the pitchers throw: 65, 70 even 73 miles per hour shows up on the gun. One of the big issues a hitter faces as he starts playing on regional and national levels is the ability to hit the high-speed fastball.

 

Typically you will see players swing a weighted bat on deck in order to “gear up” for the cheese. If this is part of your routine I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but this will not increase your bat speed and, in most cases, will actually decrease it—obviously not what you want.

 

This is because when you swing a heavy bat 15 percent or greater than your game bat you not only change your mechanics (which leads to inconsistent batting mechanics) you also teach your body to swing slow. Sure the bat will feel lighter in your hands, but you will swing slower. Now it is OK to loosen up the shoulders and wrist by moving a heavy bat around your body, just don’t replicate your swing.

 

I know by now you’re saying, “Jon, if a heavy bat will hinder me, what should I do?”

 

It’s quite simple really, swing a lighter bat! Swing a bat 10-15 percent lighter than your normal game bat on deck 5 to 8 times. Try to be as quick as possible when you do it. This will increase your game bat speed because now your body will know what it feels like to swing faster.

 

This is a very simple tip, yet extremely powerful and effective.

 

(Jon Doyle is a former NCAA All-American baseball player who now works as a strength and conditioning specialist. For more tips check out www.baseballtrainingsecrets.com )

1,388 Views 0 Comments Permalink Tags: baseball, little-league-baseball, jon-doyle, llws

 

+[http://active.typepad.com/.shared/image.html?/photos/uncategorized/73439832.jpg] (Another great sports tip from guest blogger Jon Doyle of+ {[|http://www.baseballtrainingsecrets.com/])

 

 

 

I get this question many times so I've decided to answer for everyone to see..."Jon, what is the best way to make a lasting impression during tryouts."

 

 

 

It's really simple actually, but you would be surprised how many mess this up...

 

 

 

1. Introduce yourself to the coaches holding tryouts. This is rarely done, but instantly makes you memorable to coaches who are understaffed and overwhelmed. I don't care if you're a local legend or just moved into town yesterday. This act immediately will label you as a leader and someone a coach wants on his team.

 

 

 

952 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: baseball, jon-doyle

 

[http://active.typepad.com/.shared/image.html?/photos/uncategorized/71510742.jpg]

(Another great sports tip from guest blogger Jon Doyle of {[|http://www.baseballtrainingsecrets.com/])

 

 

 

Every player and team is forced to throw away dozens of rain soaked baseballs each year. On top of that, if your field has any trees or woods near it, you'll find many waterlogged baseballs each year while searching for foul balls.

 

 

 

Well, I'm here to save the day and teach you how to become a stronger, more powerful hitter using those balls you were throwing away.

 

 

767 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: baseball, jon-doyle

 

(Another great sports tip from guest blog[.com|http://www.baseballtrainingsecrets.com/])+

 

 

 

It's January and the season is right around the corner. Some leagues are already holding sign ups. It's time to knock the rust off and get ready for the coming baseball season.

 

 

 

So what should the ballplayer be doing this time of year?

 

 

 

1.     You should perform some general conditioning work. This can be done in the form of a structured workout or can be playing other sports such as basketball or flag football.

 

 

 

2.     Get Your Arm In Shape. Start throwing now. It only has to be a few throws a day, but get started asap. The best way to get your arm in shape is doing so over time, not just before the season starts.

 

 

 

3.     Use The Tee. All great swings start with proper tee work. For those in cold weather states a tee station can be constructed in the garage or basement. Work on the tee now will ensure you enter the season with perfect swing mechanics.

 

 

 

4.    Have fun. Even in the off-season baseball should be fun. Make practice enjoyable, rewarding and memorable by being positive, building self-confidence and improving skill set.

 

 

 

(Jon Doyle is a former NCAA All-American baseball player who now works as a strength and conditioning specialist. For more tips check out .com)

 

 

782 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: softball-fastpitch, baseball, jon-doyle

Hydration

Posted by Trish18 Jun 6, 2006

 

 

(Another great sports tip from guest blogger Jon Doyle of www.baseballtrainingsecrets.com)

 

 

 

I am going to make this post very short...Please do not make the mistake of thinking this fact lowers the importance of this message...I know you have heard this many, many times before...But have you really followed this crucial advice?

 

 

 

Drink Water...And Lots Of It!

 

 

 

With the baseball season here hydration will play a crucial role in your performance...whether or not you realize it...

 

 

 

Proper Hydration improves...

 

 

 

-Energy Levels

-Focus

-Reaction Times (i.e. speed)

-Recovery

-Strength

-Stamina

-Etc, I can literally go on all day...

 

 

 

Basically, proper hydration improves every bodily function there is. Bar none.

 

 

 

Ok, Jon...So How Much Should I Drink?

 

 

 

To Keep things simple multiply your body weight by one...I think everyone can do that

 

 

 

Now simply drink your bodyweight in ounces each and every day. Not soda. Not Diet Soda. Not tea. Not Gatorade. WATER!

 

 

 

That's it. Simple.

 

 

 

If you are thirsty you are already at least 2% dehydrated.

 

 

 

Yes, you will go to the bathroom more. That is a good thing! Your body will adapt...now go drink water...oh yeah, don't gulp it.

 

 

 

(Jon Doyle is a former NCAA All-American baseball player who now works as a strength and conditioning specialist. For more tips check out [www.baseballtrainingsecrets.com|http://www.baseballtraining

 

 

758 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: coaching, jon-doyle

Mind Games

Posted by Trish18 May 31, 2006

 

 

(Another great sports tip from guest blogger Jon Doyle of www.baseballtrainingsecrets.com)

 

 

 

There is no doubt that you have heard many coaches, and even more quotes by pro ball players, talk about how important the mental aspect is to the game of baseball.

 

 

 

Then why isn't mental training taught more by coaches?

 

 

 

I have no idea. Maybe you can offer a suggestion.

 

 

 

I will let you in on an inside "secret" that will enable you to take your game to the next level. A secret so powerful that you will have the ability to put your body on auto-pilot and let your instincts take over...almost at will!

 

 

 

What is this secret?...Visualization.

 

 

 

Yeah I know you have heard the word thrown around many times, but did anyone tell you how to apply it? Probably not.

 

 

 

Here is a simple three- step solution so you can become a visualization master.

 

 

 

1. Close you eyes and picture in your head the best swing you ever took. The best pitch you ever threw. The best play you ever made. It does not matter. Just see that perfect play and "watch" it over and over in your head.

 

 

 

Do this with as much detail as possible. The smell, the sky, the crowd, the catcher pounding his glove. You get the idea. As much detail as possible.

 

 

 

2. Ok now that you have that perfect play in mind take it into the on deck circle, the pitcher's mound or the field. You will want to practice this as much as possible. The more you do it the better you get (as do the results!) If you do not feel comfortable using the visualization techniques in a game just yet, work on them in practice or exibition games.

 

 

 

Now just take that perfect play and "plug in" the pitcher or batter and the current surroundings. See yourself take that perfect swing. Feel yourself launch that perfect fastball on the black.

 

 

 

See it over and over. When you are good you will be able to do this in split seconds. I used to do it between every pitch! And I teach my students to do the same.

 

 

 

3. Let your body take over! Your body knows what to do considering all of the practice time you put in. It is the mind that gets in the way. Not any more!

It's really that simple once you master this awesome technique. Do yourself and give it a try. You will certainly thank me.

 

 

 

Good luck!

 

 

 

+(Jon Doyle is a former NCAA All-American baseball player who now works as a strength and conditioning specialist. For more tips check out [www.baseballtrainingsecrets.com|http://www.baseballtrainingsecre

 

 

 

908 Views 0 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: coaching, softball-fastpitch, baseball, jon-doyle, sports-psychology

What Is Core Strength?

Posted by Trish18 May 15, 2006

 

 

(Another great sports tip from guest blogger Jon Doyle of www.baseballtrainingsecrets.com)

 

 

 

"Core Strength" is currently a hot buzz phrase. But, what exactly does it mean?

 

 

 

Basically the "Core" of your body is from your mid-thigh to right below your chest. These muscle groups comprise of what is considered by many the power center of the body.

 

 

 

This is where speed, power, and strength all originate from. If you have great core strength you will have an advantage over your opponent. In addition, tremendous core strength will also help prevent back, knee and shoulder injuries as well.

 

 

 

Sadly, most core training programs consist of only crunches. While crunches are OK exercises, they will do very little for the core. Ground-based exercises that focus on training movement patterns will do a far superior job in developing the core strength that is needed to perform great and injury-free.

 

 

 

(Jon Doyle is a former NCAA All-American baseball player who now works as a strength and conditioning specialist. For more tips check out [www.baseballtrainingsecrets.com|http://www.baseballtraining

 

 

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(Another great sports tip from guest blogger Jon Doyle of www.baseballtrainingsecrets.com)

 

 

 

Sadly, youth shoulder-related injuries (and surgeries) have increased three-fold over the last decade. This number is certainly alarming and a cause for concern.

 

 

 

However, it is quite easy to avoid such injuries IF you know what to look for and what preventative measures to take.

 

 

 

1. Abuse. Today, youth pitchers throw three to four times as many pitcher per season than they did a decade ago. When I played Little League we played 16 games and maybe a few for All-Stars. Now, a youth ballplayer can easily play over 100 games a year. Simple math tells you there is a greater chance for injury if you do not take the correct measures (which I will explain below).

 

 

 

2. Incorrect throwing mechanics. Simply put, if a pitcher is throwing in a manner that places a large amount of stress on their arm and doing it over and over, an arm injury is going to happen. Period. Remember, arm injuries rarely are acute. They are a product of abuse over time.

 

 

 

3. Preventative exercises. If a player is old enough to pitch, he or she is old enough to perform simple exercises that only take 5-7 minutes a few times a week. These exercises will not stunt their growth or cause any harm. They will balance out the body and help prevent injuries.

 

 

 

Please don't overlok this message. You may think it could never happen to your child, but as I see it arm injuries are here to stay. The sad thing is they are so easily preventable.

 

 

 

Jon Doyle is a former NCAA All-American baseball player who now works as a strength and conditioning specialist. For more tips check out [www.baseballtrainingsecrets.com|http://www.baseballtraining

 

 

1,695 Views 1 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: coaching, baseball, jon-doyle

What is 'Strength'?

Posted by Trish18 Apr 20, 2006

 

 

(Another great sports tip from guest blogger Jon Doyle of www.baseballtrainingsecrets.com)

 

 

 

When most people hear the word "strength" they think of a big, muscle-bound individual - such as a bodybuilder, strongman or any baseball player of the past decade :). But, nobody ever takes the time to explain what it means.

 

 

 

Actually, the word "strength" is a very broad term. There are many different types of strength. Maximal, speed, reactive, relative and starting strength are all different aspects of strength. I know, I know this is confusing, but trust me you need to know this!

 

 

 

Basically, many differnt types of strength are needed to excel in sport. The key is to develop an athlete who has a great balnce of the different aspects of strength.

 

 

 

Most athletes make the mistake of judging how "strong" they are only by the weight on the bar. This is a huge mistake. There is a reason why NCCA athletes who lift the most weight are often second and third- string players. Because the weight on the bar is only one aspect of strength.

 

 

 

Develop an all- around athlete and he/she will not only perform better, but will be more healthy and less injury-prone!

 

 

 

(Jon Doyle is a former NCAA All-American baseball player who now works as a strength and conditioning specialist. For more baseball tips check out [www.baseballtrainingsecrets.com|http://www.baseballtraining

 

 

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Dynamic Warm-Up Is King!

Posted by Trish18 Apr 14, 2006

 

 

(Another great baseball tip from guest blogger Jon Doyle of www.baseballtrainingsecrets.com)

 

 

 

Baseball (and virtually every other sport for that matter) involves a high amount of explosive and dynamic movements throughout the course of practice and playing. Swinging, throwing, running and everything else in between are all done in a very fast and explosive manner.

 

 

 

So why would anyone warm-up with a lap around the field and some boring, ineffective stretching? I have no idea. But if you were never told you are excused. However, you must change your mindset from this point on.

 

 

 

Dynamic warm-ups teach flexibility, strength, coordination, balance and conditioning--all while decreasing injury and preparing the athlete to play.

 

 

 

Did I mention that it only takes between 7 -10 minutes? No more 30 minute warm-up and wasted practice time. Increase performance, decreased injury and more fun in 7 minutes! What more could you ask for?

 

 

 

(Jon Doyle is a former NCAA All-American baseball player who now works as a strength and conditioning specialist. For more baseball tips check out [www.baseballtrainingsecrets.com|http://www.baseballtraining

 

 

1,035 Views 4 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: coaching, baseball, jon-doyle

 

 

(Another great baseball tip from guest blogger Jon Doyle of www.baseballtrainingsecrets.com)

 

 

 

With Major League Baseball in full swing I think it is important to learn the nuances of the game as you watch.

 

 

 

If you are a young player watch how the pros go about their business.

 

 

 

If you are a parent or coach this is your chance to get across points you have been trying to make. Now, you will have the support of the Major Leaguers your kids look up to!

 

 

 

For instance, if you are teaching how to get in front of a ground ball, simply have them watch Derek Jeter. He is textbook on almost every play.

 

 

 

It is also a great way to get across that even the pros aren't perfect. I think this is important to teach the kids how the pros simply shake it off and get back to playing the game they love.

 

 

 

The possibilities are endless. Watching the games together (or assigning "homework" - This will be the best homework they have ever done) will allow everyone to get more out of each game.

 

-


Jon Doyle is a former NCAA All-American baseball player who now works as a strength and conditioning specialist. For more baseball tips check out [www.baseballtrainingsecrets.com|http://www.baseballtraining

730 Views 3 Comments 0 References Permalink Tags: coaching, baseball, jon-doyle
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