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2113 Views 9 Replies Latest reply: Aug 30, 2011 1:16 PM by SOAPFREAK RSS
SOAPFREAK Amateur 12 posts since
Aug 25, 2011
Currently Being Moderated

Aug 26, 2011 2:19 PM

Special device timer for C25k?

Hi I'm new here and new to running. I find I am getting very winded when running.  Almost discouraged.  Anyway, I was wondering is there a device you can wear on your wrist that you can set the C25k schedule? Something that won't break the bank.  I am currently using a kitchen timer in each hand with 60 seconds in one hand and 90 seconds in the other. I haven't started the C25k yet but have tried running recently this way.  Is there an easier way than this?

Thanks for any input.

Kristy

  • RunningQueen26 Expert 43 posts since
    Aug 3, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Aug 26, 2011 4:37 PM (in response to SOAPFREAK)
    Re: Special device timer for C25k?

    I have an android phone and downloaded runkeeper and programed the C25K into runkeeper.  I can listen to my own playlist and it talks over the music to tell me when to run and when to walk.





    Started C25K - June 17, 2011

    Completed C25K - August 21, 2011

    First 5K: September 17, 2011 (Wipe Out Kids’ Cancer Oktoberfest Run) - 34:44 (avg 11:10 a mile)

    Best 5K run in 2011 - 10/24/11 - 30:34 (avg 9:51 a mile)

    October 29, 2011 (Trek or Treat 5K) - 31:56 (avg 10:14 a mile)

    Personal Record - 1/29/12 - 5K - 28:27 (avg 9:12 a mile)

    March 3, 2012 (Allen Eagle Run 5K) - 31:20 (avg 10:06 a mile)

    March 31, 2012 (Firefly Run 5K) - 31:15 (avg 10:01 a mile)

    August 12, 2012 (Hottest Half 10K) - 1:13:18 (avg 11:48 a mile)

    October 27, 2012 (Dallas 13.1 Marathon) - 2:41:36 (avg 12:20 a mile)

    November 22, 2012 (Dallas Turkey Trot 8 miles) - 1:33:08 (avg 11:38 a mile)

  • skypilot77 Legend 1,077 posts since
    Dec 16, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. Aug 26, 2011 5:43 PM (in response to SOAPFREAK)
    Re: Special device timer for C25k?

    you can buy an iron man, or casio watch that will give you all the functions you need for $20, or less at kmart, walmart, etc.





  • joannadnc Expert 48 posts since
    Jul 18, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Aug 30, 2011 9:54 AM (in response to SOAPFREAK)
    Re: Special device timer for C25k?

    Hi Kristy! Welcome to running! : ) When I got started this spring, I bought a Timex ironman watch that does interval timing ($40 at Target). It has a Chrono setting, which allows me to capture the total workout time and "laps" so I can see whether I'm starting too fast (if I start too fast, my second neighborhood lap will be slower than my first, so I need to adjust the next time), a "timer" that will repeat a single duration, and an "interval timer" that will repeat two alternating durations. This worked for me for the C25K intervals, although it got tricky when there were more than two durations in the training! I had to set the Timer for 90 seconds and use it as a single and then double (3 minutes), I think, then use the interval setting for two other durations (I'm remembering 5 minutes and 2:30, but it's been awhile). Now I'm using the Jeff Galloway half marathon to finish program, and I'm using consistent 2:30 run/ 1:00 walk intervals, so the interval and total (chrono) is what I use. The Chrono ability is common to all of these training watches, but not all of them have a two-duration interval setting.

     

    Before I got started I read the beginners info on the Cool Running website (the official Couch to 5K stuff) and training information in Jeff Galloway's Book on Running and his "Training" book. All of those emphasized the importance of going slow enough that you can carry on a conversation and taking short strides. The slow pace allows you to enjoy the experience, and the short stride prevents injury by keeping your hips, knees, and feet within your particular range of motion. It was awful. I felt slow, and pathetic, and ridiculous. But I had tried it "my way" -- the way I'd run 2.5 miles fairly regularly in college (20 years ago!) -- and all I'd managed to do was hurt myself. So I went out there, slow enough I could talk with my boyfriend (complaining about how slow I was going, but that the only measure of success was going to be if I had no pain the next day) and taking tiny little steps, barely picking my feet off the ground. After that first day, I never complained about the pace or stride again. It worked! No pain, only the joy of having found something that would allow me to actually exercise regularly and get back in shape again! So, if you're getting winded, I'd suggest you slow down. All you need to do right now is to be moving forward. The speed you can work on later once you've gotten your lungs, heart, legs and abdominals used to the idea!

     

    Good running! Congrats for getting started -- you're on your way!!!

     

    --joanna

  • PlumeriaTattoo Amateur 27 posts since
    Aug 26, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. Aug 30, 2011 10:23 AM (in response to SOAPFREAK)
    Re: Special device timer for C25k?

    I downloaded a free podcast for my iPod that plays music and tells you when to run and when to walk.  Works really well.

  • BradenMommyof5 Pro 176 posts since
    Jan 4, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    6. Aug 30, 2011 12:28 PM (in response to SOAPFREAK)
    Re: Special device timer for C25k?

    You're using a timer?!?!?!?  Wow, that's impressive-there's not way I would've been able to keep it all straight w/ just a timer! 

     

    I found a FREE podcast that was a LIFESAVER!!!! It's in mp3 format and you can download it to any device that plays mp3 files.  The podcasts were created by a man named Robert Ullrey and he did one podcast for each week of c25k.  It tells you when to do your warm up, when to walk and when to run, and when you're cool down begins.  It's nothing short of amazing!  Here's the website:

     

    http://c25k.com/podcasts.htm

     

    There are also more options at:

     

    www.c25k.com

     

    Good luck!  Hopefully this will make things MUCH, much easier fory you.

     

    Happy running!





    Jenn / BradenMommyof5

    <//><

  • joannadnc Expert 48 posts since
    Jul 18, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. Aug 30, 2011 12:51 PM (in response to SOAPFREAK)
    Re: Special device timer for C25k?

    Ah, the runners' legs. You should be warned that running increases your appetite -- and each mile you run only burns about 80-100 calories. So if you reward yourself too heartily, or if you don't pay attention to what you're eating, you're actually likely to gain weight as you get started. I started in April, and I've seen my body reshap a bit -- more muscle tone in the hamstrings and calves, shoulders/biceps, and abs (mostly from doing crunches so that I can contract my abs when I run so that I can keep my hips and pelvis appropriately aligned), but the darn scale is right where I started. So, more of that number is muscle than it was in April, and I bet after a month or so you'll start to see noticeable changes in yourself, too. Just keep an eye on what you eat or it'll get covered up without even trying!

     

    Although to have strong shapely quadriceps, you'd probably benefit from bicycling. Long distance running (i.e. an efficient motion not at all like sprinting, just enough to clear the ground) works the hamstrings and calves much more than the front of the thighs. You can gain quadricep strength by adding speed training to your running workouts, but that ought to be 6 months to a year down the road -- it's really hard on the body. Adding 30 minutes of bicycling after your run should allow you to gain that quad strength without putting you at increased risk of injury. (30 minutes or so assuming it's outside; a stationary bike has no coasting, so wouldn't need to be as long.) Of course, if you haven't been biking, don't add it all at once -- you don't want your body to rebel. 5 minutes to start with would be more than fine.

     

    Re form, as long as you don't feel any tweaks or pains, you're probably doing just fine regardless of how you're doing it!

     

    --joanna

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