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5312 Views 11 Replies Latest reply: Apr 8, 2012 5:15 PM by Swebb0310 RSS
DerekBeckman0 Amateur 13 posts since
Jan 31, 2012
Currently Being Moderated

Mar 20, 2012 6:23 AM

Mile Times....

Seriously! what does a guy have to do to bring his times down!?!  I've held a good schedule, cross trained,  tried varing my work outs and i just can't seem to get faster.  Oh well I suppose.  I anticipate that if I keep running and lifting and sparring I will continue to get faster.  Even if it isn't incredibly noticable





D. Beckman

  • Snerb Pro 140 posts since
    Jan 27, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Mar 20, 2012 7:35 AM (in response to DerekBeckman0)
    Mile Times....

    My first race of 2011 was on 4/30 and I ran a 5k at an 8:49 pace, on 9/17 I ran a 4.4 mile trail run at a 8:02 pace.

     

    I can say with 100% certainty that the increase in speed (albiet minimal) was directly related to my off road running/training.  I bought some aggressive trail shoes and left my road shoes at home.  Virtually the whole summer I ran on a ski hill, I never tracked the distance I was running I only looked at my stop-watch.  My goal every time I ran on the ski hill was to run for at least 40 minutes.

     

    I'm no trainer, nor medically minded.  But I'm guessing the increase in leg strength and increases to the cardio vascular system that I gained from working on the ski hill is the biggest reason I was able to run 8:02 minute miles.

     

    It's finally spring in Central Wisconsin and I'll be running the ski hill as soon as possible.

     

    Cheers!





    PR's

    5k - 24:26

    5k Trail - 24:57

    5 Mile - 39:52

    10k - 51:19

    10k Trail - 53:15

  • Jasko123 Legend 461 posts since
    Apr 18, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. Mar 20, 2012 2:27 PM (in response to DerekBeckman0)
    Mile Times....

    Take a look at your LR schedule and try extending it out.  This will help (over a period of time to build endurance and speed).  Hill workouts are also a good idea, as Snerb suggested.  Also, are you entering races?  You would be suprised how active participation in events increases performance and adds additional motivation for workouts. 

     

    You mentioned variations, but try totally changing your running route, training times and expectations.  Find a vastly different location, with new challenges, and longer distances. 

    (Often times, runners become attached to a particular routine and it is difficult to push beyond it because it becomes comfortable).  I ran the same course for years (still do sometimes), but to improve my time...I had to adjust within a different environment. 

     

    Basically, change all the elements within your control and one of them will make the difference. 

  • Joseph Tree Legend 378 posts since
    Oct 22, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Mar 20, 2012 5:51 PM (in response to Jasko123)
    Mile Times....

    One other aspect that I'm focusing on lately is to give myself a really good rest after a hard workout.  For example, you can do an easy distance run a day or two after a hard workout, but exert real discipline and keep your time to something like a minute a mile slower than your workout pace,  Your body will have a chance to rebuild and expand it's capillary bed, or something like that.  Even better, do a bit of reading and see the bigger picture,  Look up Maffetone training and you'll find people who show amazing results.

    Good luck!





    Barefoot / Minimalist Runner

    ...not maintaining this these days..

    07/29/2012 Marsh Creek Raptor Run 10 Mile Trail Race

    07/15/2012 Quadzilla 15K Trail Run, Trexlertown, PA 1:37 (2011, 1:49)

    04/29/2012 Lehigh Valley / St. Luke's HM, 1:43:15 (2011, 1:54:20 )

    03/19/2012 Kutztown Fool's Run 10 Miler, 1:18:15 (2011, 1:30:20)

    02/26/2012 Ugly Mudder 7.2 Mile Trail Run, Reading, PA 1:20

    11/27/2011 Dirty Bird 15K Trail Run, Birdsboro, PA 1:40

    10/08/2011 Lehigh Gap Nature Center 10K Trail Run (6.38 miles), 59:20 (10/07/2012)

    Started running (again) May 5, 2010

  • MarcusB092 Amateur 75 posts since
    Jul 28, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. Mar 21, 2012 7:18 PM (in response to DerekBeckman0)
    Mile Times....

    It depends what your question is. Do you want to get your mile time better along with your other racing times or just your mile time better? 

     

    Running under 12 minutes per mile. If your new to running just keep moving and youll get it after some time!

     

    Running under 11 mins = just keep running in general.

     

    Under 10  a little more practice but shouldn't be hard with a little bit of training and time

     

    Under 9 This can be done with longer runs or shorter runs for your first time.

     

    Under 8 minute miles. Might be hard for a beginner but Put in more speed and effort and you should get it in 3 months or 4.

     

    Under 7 minutes. This is a respectable pace to run for many miles. If just 1 mile you can get this by doing alot of 5-20 minute runs hard.

     

    Under 6 minutes. Alot of people cant do this. But you can if you do more 5-20 minute runs all out. It will take more time to do than the others. You got to run fast alot to break 6.  You probably got to do shorter distace harder runs bcause 10 8 minute miles wont help you break 6 minute miles. It might get your times down but probably youll be stuck around 6:15 if your not doing alot of miles under 7

     

    Under 5 minute mile. That's not easy!! This can take a few years maybe.  Doing 400's 800's and 1000s and 1200s  and miles can help with intervals. But you need to keep doing other runs and not do pure interval training to break 5 min mile. Because your heart and lungs have to be at a level over time where they can adapt. They can't adapt on just 10 minutes of hard runs a day or just 8 minute mile (this will help your health but not enough power for under 5 minute mile).

     

     

    Under 4 minute mile.. I don't know I never had done it :\  But you would be nearly pro if you could do it.

  • Lochbain Amateur 36 posts since
    Apr 23, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    6. Mar 23, 2012 8:16 AM (in response to DerekBeckman0)
    Mile Times....

    Just keep running. If you are just starting off then building your base mileage will help you speed up. If you have been running for a while build on your base some more and try to push just a little harder on the medium and short runs. Also remember that your time will not drop overnight or even over a month sometimes.

  • Gregory_X Rookie 7 posts since
    Mar 27, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. Mar 28, 2012 3:36 PM (in response to DerekBeckman0)
    Mile Times....

    Derek, I'm 44 and returned to running just under three years ago; I had not run since high-school. I've got the mile back under 5 minutes now. I think the keys have been all the standards for distance (endurance / duration runs, hill runs, hill workouts, tempo runs, etc) AND the track / speed work - ideally with other people to engage that competitiveness. On the track, it's 150-in-and-outs, 200s, 400s, 600s, 800s, 1200s - all at mile target pace or slightly better on the real speed workout days. Not /usually/ as all-outs, but as training for the 1-mile pace. 3-5 miles of them on the track. And fartlek workouts another day of the week or as a replacement for the track speed work. Again, the fartlek "on" pace is the mile pace; the rest pace is whatever's required.

     

    I have the advantage of running with a guy my age who can still run a 4:10 mile. He does weekly speed work with other ultra-high-performance runners (high-school and college and others). I figure if that approach works for him, it's probably a pretty good one in general and seems to be working for me.

     

    Good luck!





    < run exclusively racing flats; 60-90 miles in 6-7 days per week; train on trails, roads, tracks >

    Results - at 46-years-old:

    8/2012 - Mile 4:47

    3/2014 - 5K 16:12

    11/2013 - 10K 34:55

    10/2013 - Half Marathon 1:19:22

    12/2013 - Marathon 2:52:05

    (I kinda feel silly posting this stuff - but I realize when I read posts that it helps me understand who's posting.)

  • Michael Lohr Rookie 3 posts since
    Sep 21, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    8. Mar 29, 2012 11:51 AM (in response to DerekBeckman0)
    Mile Times....

    There isn't a single approach to a good runner of your caliber.

    An overall philosophy is to play to your strengths but attack your weaknesses.

     

    This applies to any distance!  The race it self will highlight what your body needs. For example. If you have enough speed but just cant hang onto to the pace past 3/4 of a mile then you need to focus on endurance workouts. IE 12 miles or longer. )Long and easy. On the other hand if you can get up to speed and can pretty much maintain pace, then you simply may not have enough leg speed. This can be confirmed by running a hard half mile. If there isnt a significant drop in time vs your half split then speed workouts are in order.

     

    In this case  a workout like repeat 220s with MAX rest in between might help. ( In this workout you want to be completly refreshed before the next interval) Also limit the  number of repeats to around 10-12

     

    Often we focus on what or legs are doing. If your body can't get enough Oxygen to the legs  then we will see a limit on our ability to improve.

    Theoretically all workouts out are improving that ability. However at a certain point we risk injury to see any more marked improvement by running hard for longer and longer periods of time.

     

    Consider finding a hill. Not an grade but a monster hill. For example I have a hill that has close to a 1000 ft elevation gain in less than 3 miles. Portions I still cant run. Run this several times a week. Even though you will be on Oxygen debt for significant periods of time you really do not out that much strain on the legs. The other benefit is you work your hamstrings which provide and extra lift which in turn helps your over all speed.

     

    Good Luck!

  • kris0511 Amateur 20 posts since
    Mar 10, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    9. Apr 2, 2012 10:33 AM (in response to DerekBeckman0)
    Mile Times....

    Hey, I feel you on the mile times. I was running ( embarrassed right now) an 11 minute mile last year at this time- joined a gym and started strength training and cross training, even started running on a treadmill ( so not a fan!) in addition to road running, sprints, and using the resources God gave us- the outdoors, and an now running between an 8 and 9 minute mile. I find that if I rest, I run better and my times are improved. I am currently dealing with a possible torn meniscus- not 100% sure yet, but it feels like the others I've had. My weight was also not the best, so I lost a few pounds, and improved my time as well. I wish you all the best, but most of all, don't get discouraged and just enjoy your runs. I find that if I worry less about my time, and enjoy my runs, I do better. Best of Luck!!!!

  • Gregory_X Rookie 7 posts since
    Mar 27, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    10. Apr 2, 2012 10:57 AM (in response to kris0511)
    Mile Times....

    Kris (and anyone else "embarrassed" by their pace): it may not seem like it, but no matter how fast I go, the distance from my pace to the next level up is ALWAYS daunting and embarrassing. I find it even more embarrassing to strive for another 10 seconds and NOT be able to hit it than when I was striving for a minute per mile and struggling. It's exponentially harder, but my linear mindset makes it feel worse.

     

    FTR, three years ago, I did not run a timed one-mile, but my average running pace for the 274 miles logged on my Garmin in 2009 was 10:38. Pretty embarrassing at the time. It felt easy and confidence-inspiring to pull that average down to 9-minute, then 8-minute; and to log a timed mile and various race times. But it continues to be harder and harder to pull it down further; and my pride struggles with it as I set ever smaller goals for gain.

     

    Please be proud of your gains. And your efforts that get you there - or even miss. I keep trying to do the same.





    < run exclusively racing flats; 60-90 miles in 6-7 days per week; train on trails, roads, tracks >

    Results - at 46-years-old:

    8/2012 - Mile 4:47

    3/2014 - 5K 16:12

    11/2013 - 10K 34:55

    10/2013 - Half Marathon 1:19:22

    12/2013 - Marathon 2:52:05

    (I kinda feel silly posting this stuff - but I realize when I read posts that it helps me understand who's posting.)

  • Swebb0310 Amateur 21 posts since
    Apr 8, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    11. Apr 8, 2012 5:15 PM (in response to DerekBeckman0)
    Mile Times....

    I don't know if your still trying to bring thy time down, but one thing that I have found o be helpful is tracking the first mile time of my run and my overall pace. It's been harder to drop the first mile time than the overal pace but even if it's just a few seconds every few times, you can see it. My first mile time was about 8-8:30 minutes. After 2 1/2 weeks it's down to 7:15-7:40. Also I LOVE the course I run and don't want to change that, but I feel like when I go run my next race I will be able to bring down a little more. We shall see. Did you have by luck?

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