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2753 Views 6 Replies Latest reply: Sep 2, 2012 7:23 AM by TexasTore
lawrenceboland Rookie 3 posts since
Dec 14, 2007
Currently Being Moderated

Feb 10, 2009 6:46 AM

Hypoallergenic running shoes?

 

Over the past couple of years, I've had issues with rashes that appear on the insole of my foot.  I've been to the podiatrist, and it was determined not to be athlete's foot, but an allergic dermatitis from some compound in the shoes (be it glue, dyes, etc).  I have struggled to find shoes that are fit for running, and yet hypoallergenic.

 

 

Does anyone have any insight into a solution for this?  I suppose that some sort of insole that was hypoallergenic would work... but it would need to cover the bottom of the shoe 100% to prevent whatever hurts my feet from leaching to my foot.

 

 

Silly topic I know... but it has prevented me from starting to seriously run

 

 

  • dfitz* Legend 612 posts since
    Aug 20, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Feb 10, 2009 9:33 PM (in response to lawrenceboland)
    Re: Hypoallergenic running shoes?

     

    Interesting. If you wear socks, have you already ruled out some component of your socks (latex/stretchy stuff or rayon or polyester?) or laundry soap residue that leaches out from the socks when your feet sweat? The reason I ask is that often allergic dermatitis is from direct contact (it's often called "contact dermatitis"). I realize it could be something soaking into your socks/feet from the shoes, but don't overlook any possible source. Also keep in mind that "hypoallergenic" doesn't mean "non-allergenic." It just means that most people don't react to it.  In that context, I imagine most shoe insole materials could be considered "hypoallergenic" since the vast majority of people don't react to them.

     

     

     

     

     

    I speak from experience, although not with regard to running shoe materials... sorry!  This sounds funny but I develop a raging rash on my eyelids if there is the slightest speck of red/pink pigment in eye makeup, even if the product is liberally labeled "hypoallergenic" and even if the saleswoman insists over and over, "don't worry, we thoroughly test our products and they won't cause allergies."  Yes, they will, if my specific allergen is in it. I can wear those pigments on other parts of my face, just not on my eyelids. Obviously my problem is trivial by comparison... I only mention it to point out how puzzling allergies can be. Maybe your feet are sensitive to something that the rest of you isn't. Who knows. I would see a dermatologist next for more specialized help in identifying the cause. Best of luck!

     

     

  • dfitz* Legend 612 posts since
    Aug 20, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Feb 11, 2009 7:22 PM (in response to lawrenceboland)
    Re: Hypoallergenic running shoes?

    How interesting! Hopefully it will be one of those two things, so you don't have to spend even more time and money hunting down the source. If you think of it, post the answer if you find out. I seem to have bad luck with odd allergies (the eye makeup thing, and German shorthaired pointers... lol)  so one can never be too vigilant! Good luck.

  • ccirina Rookie 1 posts since
    Mar 25, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. Mar 25, 2012 7:10 PM (in response to lawrenceboland)
    Hypoallergenic running shoes?

    i have the same issue and have for years.  it's driving me crazy right now.  have you ever found shoes that don't cause you those problems?

  • JamesJohnsonLMT Legend 1,163 posts since
    Aug 23, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. Apr 3, 2012 11:10 PM (in response to lawrenceboland)
    Hypoallergenic running shoes?

    I would also like to know the follow-up since your testing, but it's easy to get stuck on the details and miss the big picture. Allergies and hypersensitivities may be common, but they are not common enough to be considered "normal," or even a version of normal health. If they were universally acquired and lost, maybe, but an over-reaction by your immune system, to something that bothers few others, can be a symptom of a problem elsewhere. Like many in this forum, I've had allergies that I eventually lost, and I believe that can happen for anyone.

     

    The rapidly developing field of epigenetics is showing how easily DNA can rearrange itself in response to environmental stimuli. The idea that some people just react a certain way to things as a result of genetic predisposition is no longer sufficient explanation for allergies, or almost anything else anymore. You may have been exposed to, or still in contact with, something else internal or external that has your immune system fighting  things that are otherwise harmless. I wouldn't worry about it, but it is something worth exploring.

  • TexasTore Rookie 1 posts since
    Sep 2, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    6. Sep 2, 2012 7:23 AM (in response to JamesJohnsonLMT)
    Hypoallergenic running shoes?

    Allergy is a strange phenomenon.  My skin reacts to latex in band aids and to the elastic in socks.  Wearing diabetic socks that are without elastic (100% cotton) made a huge difference.  However, I wore those socks with an old pair of New Balance running shoes, went swimming in the creek, then got the socks moist when putting them back on.  Two hours later, only the feet were itching, not the  leg covered by the upper part of the socks.  Perhaps there is latex or some other allergen in the shoe which was activated or transported by the moisture. 

     

    Now I am seeking non-allergenic running shoes. 

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