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1605 Views 11 Replies Latest reply: May 9, 2012 1:46 AM by Mason_Dixon_Blue RSS
WCLLUMP Amateur 18 posts since
Jul 17, 2004
Currently Being Moderated

May 3, 2012 8:10 AM

Balk Or Not

Using OBR, if a right-handed pitcher, on his way to becoming set (but does not become set), steps toward 3B to pick-off the runner, does that constitute a balk?  Same with a left-handed pitcher who, on his way to becoming set, does the typical move to first base where he steps with his right leg/foot to 1B for the pick-off throw.

 

The crux of the matter here is that 999 times out of 1000, we all see pitchers come set, then attempt the pickoff to first base.

 

Do not get this mixed-up with the right-handed pitcher who, on his way to set (but not there), spins, steps and throws to first-base.  This is different.

 

Thanks.

  • beowulf37 Legend 219 posts since
    May 25, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. May 3, 2012 9:16 AM (in response to WCLLUMP)
    Balk Or Not

    Towards third no.  Towards first yes. 

  • Mark__P Pro 112 posts since
    Jun 26, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. May 3, 2012 1:45 PM (in response to WCLLUMP)
    Balk Or Not

    There is no requirement for the pitcher to come to a stop in the set position before throwing to a base.

     

    You may be thinking of 8.05(m), which limits the requirement to pitching, not throwing to a base...

     

    8.05 If there is a runner, or runners, it is a balk when—   

    (m)  The pitcher delivers the pitch from Set Position without coming to a stop.   

  • beowulf37 Legend 219 posts since
    May 25, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. May 7, 2012 10:08 AM (in response to WCLLUMP)
    Balk Or Not

    Wait,  What?  Of course he can come to a stop and then throw directly to first.  He just has to come to a stop before he goes to the plate. 

  • Rich_Ives Legend 1,283 posts since
    May 25, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. May 8, 2012 6:36 AM (in response to beowulf37)
    Balk Or Not

    You misread the sentence - easy to do the way it's written.

     

    What he meant was   So, a LHP can [can what] not-come-to-a-stop, meaning it's OK to not come to a stop when throwing to 1B.  Answer is yes.

  • Mason_Dixon_Blue Legend 250 posts since
    May 25, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    8. May 8, 2012 6:42 AM (in response to WCLLUMP)
    Re: Balk Or Not

    You are seriously overthinking this.

     

    WCLLUMP wrote:

     

    LHP, on his way to coming set (conjoined hand/ball/glove descending from face towards belt) but doesn't stop during the descension as he then decides to step and throw to first base.

    This is not a balk.  The pitcher does not have to stop before throwing to a base.

     

     

     

     

    WCLLUMP wrote:

     

    At first glance, the "step" to first may resemble or look like he is starting to pitch towards home when in fact he is not.

    That's the whole idea behind throwing to a base.  To catch the runner off-guard.

     

     

    So, when it looks like he has not stopped because you think for a quick second he is pitching home (this would be a balk), he is actually throwing over to first base.

     

    Its something you rarely see and that is why I asked.

    It doesn't matter what I think it looks like.  It's what the pitcher actually does that matters.

     

    He has to come set before he delivers a pitch. 

    He does not have to come set before he throws to a base.

    It's really that simple.

  • Mason_Dixon_Blue Legend 250 posts since
    May 25, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    11. May 9, 2012 1:46 AM (in response to WCLLUMP)
    Re: Balk Or Not

    WCLLUMP wrote:

    My questions and statements boiled down to this;  at what point in time should an umpire call a balk. 

    When the pitcher delivers a PITCH without coming to a complete and discernible stop.  Up until that point, he hasn't violated any rule.

     

     

    Some umpires are conditioned to calling a balk as soon as they see the pitcher not stop, aka, not come set.  If the umpire pulls the trigger by exclaiming, "balk", the very split-second he see's that a complete set has not occurred, then the umpire is at risk for calling a balk when indeed the LHP may be throwing over to first base.

    Those umpires need to be trained better.  They're penalizing a pitcher for something that they anticipate him doing.  He hasn't balked until he delivers a pitch without coming to a complete and discernible stop.

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