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3179 Views 12 Replies Latest reply: Oct 22, 2012 9:39 AM by Jupe031 RSS
Jupe031 Rookie 14 posts since
Feb 14, 2007
Currently Being Moderated

Aug 1, 2012 10:27 AM

*Another* pacing question

I am terrible at figuring out what my pacing should be. Do you mind if I give you some info, and you recommend pacing suggestions? Thank you so much!

 

I have run 3 marathons, having my best time at my last one year ago: 4:28:00. I think I took it too easy on myself, and I've been working harder this year. I'd like to run 4:15 in October.

FYI, my last training run was 12 miles at 9:46 pace, and it felt SUPER comfortable (much more so than in previous training).

 

1) Do you think my goal is reasonable, and 2) at what pace *should* I be doing my long runs?

  • BOSNPM We're Not Worthy 2,482 posts since
    Nov 20, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Aug 1, 2012 11:44 AM (in response to Jupe031)
    *Another* pacing question

    You have not given enough info for a guess:  More info like:  Sex, Age, how long have you been running, ave MPW when not in a marathon cycle, MPW in your cycle.  A good start is to go to the McMillan Running Calculator and put in a race time from a race not to long ago (the longer the race the better but it will take a 5K)and it will tell you all the info you requested.  The calculator is guessing you are well trained and has been fairly close for me.  Just type Mcmillan Running Calculator in gogle. Good luck

  • JoeMarks Rookie 5 posts since
    Sep 30, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Aug 1, 2012 12:24 PM (in response to Jupe031)
    *Another* pacing question

    This is a point that can be confusing.  Since you have not run structured workouts like hills and tempo runs I would be conservative on the long runs as those added workouts add stress to your overall training load and you don't want to end up over trained or injured.  The main goal of the long runs is to teach your body to burn fat and get use to running for longer periods of time, do not worry about speed, the tempo runs and hills will help you with that. You should not be running your long runs as fast as you intend to run the marathon, this is a common mistake.  Usually 1 min+ slower/mile or so of goal race pace.  Running faster than this will leave you depleted as you get closer to race day, especially since you are running those other workouts. 

     

    Hope that helps...





    Joe Marks

    Running and Strength Coach

    Latest Running Tips and Training

  • Jasko123 Legend 461 posts since
    Apr 18, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. Aug 1, 2012 1:27 PM (in response to Jupe031)
    *Another* pacing question

    Some of the experts recommend running 3 miles near the end of your LR near race speed, which should be around a 9:05 pace for your goals, and it may be a good option to try in combination with other elements of your training schedule.  Since you are comfortable at the 9:46 pace, you could also work for a 9:09 pace for shorter distances.  Others have suggested running about 15-20 seconds slower than full effort in the middle of the long run and then picking things up in the final few miles. 

     

    Everyone is different, so it is important to find the right combination that best fits your objectives.  Personally, I have never been the best at alternating pace, so I just pass along the advice for your consideration. 

     

    Sounds like you are doing wonderfully and wishing you all the best. 

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,369 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. Aug 1, 2012 3:47 PM (in response to Jupe031)
    *Another* pacing question

    Unfortunately, there is no simple answer to your question.  How do you improve?  Put in the miles; do interval, tempo, hill workouts; slowly improve your pace.  Long run pace has become a little controversial.  Tradition is to run 45 seconds or more slower than your anticipated marathon pace (9:44 for a 4:15).  So 9:46 would seem a bit fast - but 12 miles isn't 20, as I'm sure you know.  One way to get a better idea of what you should shoot for is to put your target time in the calculator as the current time.  Then compare the paces given to your current (and future) workouts.

     

    Len





    Len

  • BOSNPM We're Not Worthy 2,482 posts since
    Nov 20, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. Aug 2, 2012 10:13 AM (in response to Jupe031)
    *Another* pacing question

    As Jasko stated running your last third of your LR at or below MP will help but this should not be done every week.  Every third or so is good.

  • BOSNPM We're Not Worthy 2,482 posts since
    Nov 20, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    9. Sep 13, 2012 11:00 AM (in response to Jupe031)
    *Another* pacing question

    The Yassos are okay if done correct, 10 with easy jog of the same amount of time between intervals!  It also requires a set amount of MPW.  20 miles @ 9:45 pace would be 3:15 so you were 6 mins under MP which is not bad.  The last 10K can be a tuff 6.2 if you go out to fast, but I think you will be right about your goal.  Can you run a time trail 10K, that would help with a pace calculator.  Good luck

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,369 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    10. Sep 13, 2012 1:28 PM (in response to Jupe031)
    *Another* pacing question

    Yassos were originally designed for a very specific set of circumstances and have since been perverted.  I wouldn't count on them to be predictive, either way.

     

    If I were you, I would start the marathon exactly the way you are doing your training runs.  If you get to 20 miles and you're feeling good and you want to do the last 10K with no breaks - go for it.  But as they say, the halfway point is at 20 miles.  Starting too fast will kill you the last few miles.

     

    Len





    Len

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