Skip navigation
Community: Exchange advice in the forums and read running commentary Resources: Personal running log, calculators, links and other tools for runners News: Running news from around the world Training: Articles and advice about fitness, race training and injury prevention Races/Results: Find upcoming races and past results Home: The Cool Running homepage
Cool Running homepage  Search Cool Running Community

1309 Views 3 Replies Latest reply: Aug 16, 2012 5:55 PM by JamesJohnsonLMT RSS
disneygirl125 Rookie 4 posts since
Jul 18, 2012
Currently Being Moderated

Aug 7, 2012 12:28 PM

pain below knee on inner side of leg?shoes, treadmill?

I'm a new runner doing c25k. I've been doing 3 weeks with no problems until now. I did walk alot previously, but never jogged. I went to a running store and got nike free run 3.0's. I was previously wearing vibrams. Since they were new shoes, they wanted me to use a treadmill in case I needed to return them. Shoes feel great, no blisters. I'm having bad leg pain though, that has caused me to not be able to run. I ran through it one day and it got worse. It starts in the middle lower knee and goes to the side of my inner leg just below the knee. It's more in my leg then my knee. Anyone know what that sounds like? I have never ran on a treadmill before. So, the two things that changed were my shoes and running on the treadmill. Any idea if it could be either of the two and which one possibly? I miss running and want to keep going, but not sure if I should still do it since the pain is still there. I do feel it in the same place on both legs, but the left is alot worse then the right.

  • Jasko123 Legend 461 posts since
    Apr 18, 2011

    It could be an alignment/balance issue, so you may want to consider inserts or even a different model of shoes.  It is a good idea to get a professional opinion, but a lot experts also recommend stretching/strength exercises for the hamstrings and quads. 

     

    Just take things slow and check it now so that you can correct the issue and continue with your progress. 

     

    Wishing you all the best

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,390 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008

    I'm wondering why you moved away from the Vibrams.  The change in shoes combined with running on the treadmill may have encouraged you to change your form  You may be lengthening your stride and extending your feet further in front of you, putting more strain on your knees and lower legs.  Check your form and footplant, maybe go back to the Vibrams to see if there is any difference.

     

    Len





    Len

  • JamesJohnsonLMT Legend 1,160 posts since
    Aug 23, 2009

    I think it's both shoes and treadmill.

     

    First, the treadmill. People almost always set them on an incline, which strains the plantarflexors that anchor on the lower leg and can cause pain below the knee. In the real world, we are not always running uphill. We shouldn't be doing that on treadmills, either.

     

    Regarding shoes, I would never recommend that a tenderfoot runner jump cold-turkey into a running program with either Vibram 5-fingers or Nike Frees. There simply isn't enough structure in the shoe to shore up muscles, ligaments, bones and tendons that are not yet conditioned to go it alone. Start with a more structured, unnatural shoe to match the unnatural rigors of running and the artificial surfaces we run on. As you build up your muscles, you can gradually wean yourself off the support gear.

     

    When I bought the first run of Frees, instructions in the box said they were for intermittent use for just a few miles at a time until you build up for the lack of structure. They specifically said not to use them as a regular trainer. I experienced pain when I ignored their advice and tried, too.

     

    Like all strengthening exercises, unstructured footwear can be overdone to the point of weakening you. However, they have value in gradually building up to a regular program as the Free instructions originally advised. The idea is to prepare, then execute. If you try to do both at once, you are likely to experience setbacks like these.

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...