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2420 Views 11 Replies Latest reply: Oct 17, 2012 1:00 PM by Sean Coster
wanttorunmore Amateur 10 posts since
Dec 15, 2011
Currently Being Moderated

Sep 9, 2012 10:46 AM

Need help or advice

Training for my first marathon MCM in Oct.   Training is going great so far.   However, the problem I'm having is the balls of my feet (both feet) are really sore after about mile 11.  I train in Asics Kayano 18 as well as Asics Gel 33 and feel the pain when wearing either shoe.   I have tried arch support insoles as well as cushion insoles and still have the pain.   Is this normal since this is my first year of training were I'm averaging 38-45 miles a week?   The pain subsides after my long runs when I can get to my tennis ball and massage my feet.   It's not Plantar fascities I've had that years ago and know that pain well.   Any suggestions?
  • Jasko123 Legend 461 posts since
    Apr 18, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Sep 9, 2012 1:41 PM (in response to wanttorunmore)
    Need help or advice

    There are experts in the med tent that would be more qualified to offer suggestions.  If you have tried gel forefront cushions and arch supports, I could only recommend looking at other issues that might assist with stability and reducing the amount of pressure.  So, I would say consider some quality (thigh high) compression socks with extra ankle support and an upper foot cushion pad. 

     

    Also, look at the structure of your shoes and consider whether or not they represent the best model, so if there is a rounded toe in combination with a narrow toe box, that might add to the discomfort, for example.  I am not suggesting that is the case, but switching out of the Asics in training would be a good idea anyway to avoid placing strain on the same areas over and over again. 

     

    Wishing you all the best.

  • nowirun4fun Legend 208 posts since
    Oct 22, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. Sep 9, 2012 2:51 PM (in response to wanttorunmore)
    Need help or advice

    The best advice is probably what you don't want to hear - see a foot doctor.

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,431 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Sep 9, 2012 5:51 PM (in response to wanttorunmore)
    Need help or advice

    Morton's Neuroma?

     

    Len





    Len

  • nowirun4fun Legend 208 posts since
    Oct 22, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    6. Sep 9, 2012 7:02 PM (in response to wanttorunmore)
    Need help or advice

    That's too bad.  My foot doctor is the one doctor who has helped me everytime I needed to see him.  Actually, that's the only doctor I can really say that about, and do feel pretty lucky.  My 48 year old feet need all the help they can get, and he's always got something for me.  Other than my feet, I'm with you on self fixing.  It is mostly out of necessity though, since all other doctors basically prescribe the same thing to me - slow down, don't run so much, you're not 20 anymore.  Other than Dr. Foot, I basically don't use them at all now.

     

    Good luck.

  • Haselsmasher Legend 520 posts since
    May 25, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. Sep 10, 2012 6:22 AM (in response to wanttorunmore)
    Re: Need help or advice

    Have you ever assessed (either on your own or with someone) your running style/form?  I wonder if there is something you're doing with how you run that may be putting extra stress on your feet.  Two examples just to make the point:  If you're a heel striker that takes long strides, maybe the foot is "slapping" down onto the ground extra hard?  Another:  Do you bend your knees much when landing?  As I've messed with my form I've been amazed at how different running feels with more knee bend.  It puts your body in a position to have the whole body absorb the landing, and not focus the energy in a smaller part of the leg.

     

    Jim





    "Kick off your high heel sneakers, it's party time."

    -- From the song FM by Steely Dan

  • Haselsmasher Legend 520 posts since
    May 25, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    9. Sep 11, 2012 5:22 PM (in response to wanttorunmore)
    Re: Need help or advice

    These might be kind of long shots but I'll throw them out there anyway:

    • When you land with your forefoot, do you leave your calf relaxed so that your heel can come down?  Some people keep their calves tight to prevent the heel from touching, and that can be bad.
    • Since you're running in pretty conventional shoes they have a reasonably high heel-to-toe drop, which means your heel can't come down as far as it was "designed" to.  I wonder if that's causing your forefoot to take the brunt of the landing force.  Another way to say it:  If your foot/heel could get lower to the ground (using a show with a lower heel-to-toe drop) I wonder if the landing force would be spread over your foot more - and also enable the leg above the foot to work better.

     

    Grasping at my $.02.

     

    Jim





    "Kick off your high heel sneakers, it's party time."

    -- From the song FM by Steely Dan

  • Sean Coster Rookie 1 posts since
    Nov 13, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    11. Oct 17, 2012 1:00 PM (in response to wanttorunmore)
    Need help or advice

    Wanttorunmore-I hope you finished MCM.  Although your event is over I thought I would respond.   Your case sounds challenging. Good to hear the shoe change is helped.

    Inthe long term I would suggest looking into your stability, strength and endurance throughout the core. Despite 'core' training being a common mantra for running injuries in my 15 years of coaching if still find most runners I work with do not regularly have the movement patterns they need to prevent injury, especially with marathon training. 

    I'm not talking about crunches either.  To get an idea of the exercises that would be ideal for runners of all abilities to be doing check out the link below to my instructional videos. The injury prevention and strength videos are the type that would improve running specific core strength.

    I know it's your feet but I hope you consider getting expert help in reviewing your mechanics and strength.

     

    Finally my intention isn't to promote my coaching, but if you are able to get to the Portland area our Runners Workshop would be perfect for you. http://www.crpusa.com/p/runners-workshop.html

     

     

    http://www.crpusa.com/p/instructional-videos.html

     

    Best wishes!

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