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2462 Views 11 Replies Latest reply: Feb 9, 2013 9:11 PM by QincyNL RSS
P8ballguy04 Rookie 5 posts since
Nov 23, 2012
Currently Being Moderated

Nov 23, 2012 6:08 PM

Pain in the foot

Hello everyone, I have a question i'm hoping to get answered on here. I am a new runner on week 7 of C25K. I'm loving the new lifestyle so far. I never really ran when I was younger so this is all completely new to me. My first few weeks of the program were complete agony I was in such bad shape! I thought I was past that now but during the past couple of runs I have been getting this pain in the bottom right side of my foot, It is fairly close to my ankle but radiates down to the middle of the arch. it will start hurting about mile 2. After the run I ice it but it continues hurting for a few days afterward. I can walk on it but I cant put all my weight on it without some pain. Could this be caused by me using trail shoes on a treadmill or is this a problem with my gait? Thanks for any answers you guys can provide. I probably should add that my left foot also hurts but nowhere near as bad.

  • Haselsmasher Legend 505 posts since
    May 25, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Nov 23, 2012 8:39 PM (in response to P8ballguy04)
    Pain in the foot

    At the beginning of your post you say it "hurts on the right side of your foot" and at the end of your post you say "....and my left foot also hurts."   Does that mean at the beginning of your post you're describing a pain in your right foot - so the pain is on the right side of your right foot - the outside of your foot?  And for your left foot - does it hurt in the same place (just on the opposite side of your body)?

     

    If you were to continue running - more than 2 miles - do you have a sense for whether the pain would continue to get worse?  I'm trying to understand if the pain gets worse (and would continue to get worse and worse) during the actual run.  If that is true, that *tends* to be indicative of a stress fracture.  However if you're having the same pain in the other foot it's unlikely to get stress fractures in different limbs at the same time.

     

    Have you tried not using the treadmill?  It can really change your gait.  It might be interesting to see if anything changes if you ran outside for a while.

     

    Jim





    http://jimhaselmaier.blogspot.com/


    "Kick off your high heel sneakers, it's party time."

    -- From the song FM by Steely Dan

  • Rich in NH Legend 850 posts since
    Dec 10, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Nov 24, 2012 4:43 AM (in response to P8ballguy04)
    Re: Pain in the foot

    I tend to agree with Haselsmasher about taking your runs outside, running on a treadmill has its adantages, but it's different than running outside. 

     

    Another question I would have is your shoes, are they designed for your foot type?  You basically buy running shoes based on your arch, whether it's high, low, etc.





    Enjoy life, this ain't a rehearsal...

  • Haselsmasher Legend 505 posts since
    May 25, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. Nov 24, 2012 8:11 AM (in response to P8ballguy04)
    Pain in the foot

    Running shoes are designed for different foot types and foot mechanics.  This is a/the major advantage of going to a local running store.  They can look at your feet.  Watch you walk.  And even watch you run so that shoes can be recommended that match you.

     

    The pain in your right foot sounds like it could be associated with your Peroneal muscles, which run down the outside of the lower leg.  The tendons for those muscles run around the back and bottom of the outside ankle bone. You might try massaging those muscles (it might be helpful to Google "Peroneals" and see where they are.

     

    Jim





    http://jimhaselmaier.blogspot.com/


    "Kick off your high heel sneakers, it's party time."

    -- From the song FM by Steely Dan

  • Rich in NH Legend 850 posts since
    Dec 10, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    6. Nov 24, 2012 9:26 AM (in response to P8ballguy04)
    Re: Pain in the foot

    Here's a good read about how to pick the right shoe.  It's not as good as being evaluated by a pro, but it's something every runner should know.  Once you understand which shoe you need, check the Asics you're running in to see if they're a good match. http://www.therunningadvisor.com/running_shoes.html

     

    Good luck!





    Enjoy life, this ain't a rehearsal...

  • JamesJohnsonLMT Legend 1,129 posts since
    Aug 23, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. Nov 24, 2012 9:31 AM (in response to P8ballguy04)
    Re: Pain in the foot

    I agree with everybody else so far, but don't underestimate the effect of referred pain, which describes what happens when one or more muscles begin to tire from your recent foray into athletics after a relatively sedentary lifestyle. You will feel pain somewhere on your body that corresponds to muscles elsewhere, which may directly or indirectly affect that part of your anatomy.

     

    An example would be tired plantarflexor and dorsiflexor muscles that are responsible for moving your foot up and down (ie: dorsi, plantar). These include muscles in the lower leg attached remotely to the metatarsals and phalanges of your foot. Pain will be felt down there, but is often caused up there. These muscles are not used to what you have undertaken, and should be wearing down to dysfunction about now, depending on your level of fitness as stated.

     

    If you haven't looked into preventive maintenance for the leg and foot, now's a bit late, but better late than never. Gentle self-massage techniques, both exploratory and therapeutic, can slow or prevent these types of injuries by stimulating tissue without the risks of further exercise. Benefits include circulatory, lymphatic, and neuromuscular. I just use soaped fingers in the shower to check these muscles for problems and work out the kinks, but others prefer foam-rolling or professional treatment. If you have the means and prefer to leave important work to the pros, be my guest, but in my opinion, every athlete should develop the skill of immediate and/or frequent self-treatment of muscular dysfunction before it becomes pain, or shortly thereafter. Letting problems develop too far, or undertreating them can resign you to extended bouts of chronic pain.

     

    It's true that the road of the athlete, particularly the developing athlete, is often paved with pain, but that should be from herculean effort, not from ordinary wear and tear. You always want your recovery to keep up with the inevitable damage of a regular exercise regimen, especially one focused on eventually racing. If I were you, I'd bone up on self-massage techniques and suspend or curtail the training program long enough to see if it is working. It's wrong to sacrifice your body for a schedule. There will be lots more 5ks, and better weather to come.

  • CarlsbadMike Rookie 2 posts since
    Apr 15, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    10. Nov 28, 2012 7:52 PM (in response to P8ballguy04)
    Pain in the foot

    The pain in the left foot could be what I have in my right foot, Morton's Neuroma.

     

    www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0004542/

     

    It's basically an injury to a nerve between your toes. For me it started out to numbness while I was running, which would go away quickly once my run stopped. After a few months it changed to more of a pain in the same areas, behind my toes, any time I walked. I reduced my mileage from about 90 miles a month down to 15 for a month, and it seemed to have improved. As I've ratcheted my mileage up over the last few months, some pain has returned, but I'm fighting through it to reach my goal of 1000 miles this year :-)

     

    Anti-inflamatories are said to help, as well as wearing shoes with a wider toe box.

     

    Good luck!

  • QincyNL Amateur 10 posts since
    Aug 31, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    11. Feb 9, 2013 9:11 PM (in response to P8ballguy04)
    Pain in the foot

    Pain in the foot/ arch needs to IDed correctly before you get effective treatment.  Here's a video on how to use bone landmarks to have an idea before you go in to a therapist, doc, chiro whatever.  I would suggest getting someone to do Active Release on it though... The last few people I have encountered with it have been fine and running within 2 weeks...maybe they were just lucky


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-6CeuFVpYRs

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