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17068 Views 18 Replies Latest reply: Sep 25, 2013 6:16 PM by LeahDD 1 2 Previous Next
kurtismoran Rookie 2 posts since
Aug 26, 2013
Currently Being Moderated

Aug 26, 2013 12:39 PM

running with plantar fasciitis

Hi this is my 7th wk running couch to 5 k, i have plantar fasciitis and it can be painfull , i did buy newbalance shoes and very good inserts, andone have any tips or suggestions?

  • shipo Legend 499 posts since
    Aug 9, 2013
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Aug 26, 2013 12:54 PM (in response to kurtismoran)
    running with plantar fasciitis

    I used a night splint to cure my PF.  Regarding you new shoes; did you just pick them off the rack or did you get fitted for them?  I ask because I chose the wrong pair of shoes once upon a time and it was the new shoes which caused me to get PF.  Not all shoes are created equal, and what works for one individual may well hurt another.





    Fat old man PRs:

    • 1-mile (point to point, gravity assist): 5:50
    • 2-mile: 13:49
    • 5K (gravity assist last mile): 21:31
    • 5-Mile: 37:24
    • 10K (first 10K of my Half Marathon): 48:16
    • 10-Mile (first 10 miles of my Half Marathon): 1:17:40
    • Half Marathon: 1:42:13
  • Lauri1959 Amateur 16 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. Aug 26, 2013 1:56 PM (in response to kurtismoran)
    running with plantar fasciitis

    hi and congrats on your progress. I have had PF in the past and i found that putting tape around my arches before i ran was very helpful. Also, freeze a plastic bottle of water and roll it with your foot after a run. :-)

  • SeeFluffyRun Legend 251 posts since
    Sep 2, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Aug 26, 2013 5:26 PM (in response to kurtismoran)
    running with plantar fasciitis

    Hi Curtis, I experienced PF during c25k also . I went to the doctor and she gave me a set of stretches to do. She asked that I not run until it stopped hurting. I also wore a brave to bed. It keeps your foot from constricting all night and stretches out your tendons.

     

    I wrote a post about the exercises that I did. They are wonderful and I haven't had any problems since.

     

    http://seefluffyrun.blogspot.com/2013/03/out-for-repairs.html





    Graduated C25K 08/09/2009

    Restarted 04/01/2013


    Follow me on my journey: SEEFLUFFYRUN

    Twitter: @SeeFluffyRun

    Facebook: SeeFluffyRun

    Blog: seefluffyrun.blogspot.com

  • shipo Legend 499 posts since
    Aug 9, 2013
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. Aug 27, 2013 7:16 AM (in response to kurtismoran)
    running with plantar fasciitis

    I've used a few; some worked well but weren't terribly comfortable, others were comfortable but didn't work terribly well.  The following splint worked well for me and was reasonably comfortable.

     

    http://www.footsmart.com/P-Night-Splint-10711.aspx?c=BLACK%2fBLUE





    Fat old man PRs:

    • 1-mile (point to point, gravity assist): 5:50
    • 2-mile: 13:49
    • 5K (gravity assist last mile): 21:31
    • 5-Mile: 37:24
    • 10K (first 10K of my Half Marathon): 48:16
    • 10-Mile (first 10 miles of my Half Marathon): 1:17:40
    • Half Marathon: 1:42:13
  • justamaniac Legend 207 posts since
    May 30, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    6. Aug 27, 2013 3:19 PM (in response to kurtismoran)
    running with plantar fasciitis

    Kurtis - for what it's worth (and I've suffered through PF myself)....  the root of PF is not necessarily at your foot, but rather may be a symptom of a problem somewhere else in your frame.  It could be a calf issue, ham/quad, hip misalignment, etc... That tendon/ligament area is very dependant upon so many things. The splint may help you wake up a little more comfortable, but it may not solve the problem.  Here is what I did:

     

    1) I went and saw my chiropractor (and I still go every 3-4 weeks) to make sure that I'm "aligned".

    2) I got deep massage that focused on my legs and hips

    3) A yoga friend of mine showed me a number of stretches that work all parts of my legs and hips.  I do these stretches every day.

     

    Once I started those three steps my PF abated and I have been PF pain free since Aug/2012.

     

    Also, prior to starting all of the above, I found that it didn't matter if I ran, walked, or kept off my feet with regards to my PF.  It still hurt. So I continued to run, and after each run I would ice my entire foot immediately after and that seemed to help.  I also tried taping my foot, with modest success (it may have been mental for all I know...)

     

    Bottom line:  the root cause of your PF may be somewhere other than your foot !

     

    best of luck,

    -bill

    http://runningthrutime.blogspot.com

  • Tracy26486 Rookie 1 posts since
    Feb 24, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. Aug 27, 2013 3:53 PM (in response to kurtismoran)
    running with plantar fasciitis

    I too suffered from PF. During some runs I would be brouht to tears the pain was so bad. I went to the sneaker store and got fitted into a more appropriate sneaker. I wear Brooks adreneline. But I still experienced pain until I found these: http://www.footsmart.com/P-FootSmart-Arch-Sleeves-10085.aspx  They look too simple to possibly fix all of that pain but I gave them a shot anyway. I now run just short of 30 miles per week and barely ever even feel the slightest tinge of discomfort. I wear these bands every time I workout or run and swear by them. They have a lot of other products fo PF too.Oh and I completely eliminated high heels as it would hurt worse after I switched to a sneaker after a day of wearing heels. Hope this helps. I know how bad this can hurt.

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,422 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    8. Aug 27, 2013 5:04 PM (in response to Tracy26486)
    running with plantar fasciitis

    There is a lot to what bill said about the cause being elsewhere.  In particular, tight muscles in the lower leg can increase stress on the plantar facia.  Which ties in with what Tracy26486 said about hurting worse after wearing heels.  Doing exercise to stretch and strengthen the calf and achilles and the shin muscles on the front of the leg can help, and long term (after it clears up) can help prevent a recurrence.  Toe raises, heel drops, toe taps and similar exercises can help in that regard.  Here is one exercise that can help relieve pain. http://www.ronjones.org/Coach&Train/BodyXerciseLibrary/SpecialConditions/AFootHoldThatSpursHealing.html

     

    I used a Spenco 3/4 length over-the-counter hard orthotics when I had PF.  I think they helped by providing a lot of support to my arches.





    Len

  • G. David Frye Rookie 1 posts since
    Nov 27, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    9. Sep 4, 2013 5:21 AM (in response to kurtismoran)
    running with plantar fasciitis

    An earlier poster asked about your shoes.  New Balance shoes are very popular and are very well constructed.  But you should match your shoes to your feet, and specifically to your arch: people with high arches put a lot of weight on the outside of the foot, which is not very well padded; people with low arches put a lot of weight on the arch itself, which has more padding.

     

    New Balance shoes are better for low arches - they have relatively little extra padding.  If you have high arches like me, you can buy inserts to help, but you're better off with a shoe that has more padding and better arch support, THEN add inserts if necessary.  I'm running in Asics now, without inserts, and have no more PF problems.

     

    Sales staff at a reputable runner's shoe store (not a mall store) will look at your feet and the way you walk and will give you shoe choices that better match your needs.

  • shipo Legend 499 posts since
    Aug 9, 2013
    Currently Being Moderated
    10. Sep 4, 2013 9:42 AM (in response to G. David Frye)
    running with plantar fasciitis

    G. David Frye wrote:

     

    New Balance shoes are better for low arches - they have relatively little extra padding.  If you have high arches like me, you can buy inserts to help, but you're better off with a shoe that has more padding and better arch support, THEN add inserts if necessary.  I'm running in Asics now, without inserts, and have no more PF problems.

     

     


    When I was young everyone told me to buy New Balance shoes; I suffered for years.  Why?  I too have high arches.  Like you I've gravitated to Asics shoes, they've been working for me for over ten years now. 





    Fat old man PRs:

    • 1-mile (point to point, gravity assist): 5:50
    • 2-mile: 13:49
    • 5K (gravity assist last mile): 21:31
    • 5-Mile: 37:24
    • 10K (first 10K of my Half Marathon): 48:16
    • 10-Mile (first 10 miles of my Half Marathon): 1:17:40
    • Half Marathon: 1:42:13
  • DrWalimire Rookie 1 posts since
    Sep 10, 2013
    Currently Being Moderated
    11. Sep 11, 2013 6:57 AM (in response to kurtismoran)
    running with plantar fasciitis

    Hi Kurtis,

    As a foot and ankle surgeon I can tell you that there are some good tips and some poor tips given here on this forum.  First of all, there are many causes of plantar heel pain.  It is always important to be evaluated to make sure you don't have a heel stress fracture or tarsal tunnel syndrome.  Only a foot and ankle specialist can diagnose these conditions with testing you can't do at home.

     

    Plantar fasciitis is a biomechanical problem.  The forces pushing down on the arch exceed what the fascia is able to withstand.  The fascia is then placed under tension and microtears occur within it's substance.  This process causes inflammation and thickening of the fascia.  It most often occurs at the bottom of the heel bone, but can occur throughout the arch. 

     

    Treatment options should focus on reducing the forces which cause the arch to flatten.  Tight calf muscles are usually the primary culprit.  Perform calf stretches with the knee straight and the knee flexed (do both legs, not just the painful one) three times daily until the pain resolves, and then continue these indefinitely with less frequency.  It is important for any athlete to stay flexible and this is true for all muscle groups.  You should also perform hamstring, quads, glutes, and lower back stretches every day. 

     

    No studies have ever proven that certain foot types (high arch, low arch, neutral) need certain types of shoes, although the shoe companies all make shoes for these foot types (neutral, stability, or cushioned).  What has been determined in these studies is that those who chose a shoe based upon comfort had a lower incidence of injury.  The way your foot works while standing is completely different than how it works while running.  Pick a shoe that is comfortable.

     

    That being said, my experience shows me that minimalist shoes (shoes that are flexible throughout the sole and can be bent in half) tend to exacerbate injuries in those who are prone to them.  I am not saying that minimalist shoes are bad in all instances and actually believe that they have a role in training for some individuals.  If you are currently using a minimalist shoe, try a more supportive shoe and see if this helps alleviate your pain.

     

    Finally, plantar fasciitis treatment should also include warm water soaks with aggressive massage on the painful area followed by ice bottle massage, using a golf ball to massage the painful area, using NSAIDs like ibuprofen or Aleve, and using orthotics to help act as an arch support.  Stretching is the most important part of the treatment and can be accomplished with a night splint if so desired.  Finally, if all else fails a cortisone shot usually does the trick if all else fails.  Just don't do this if you're training for anything more than a 5K as you have a risk of rupture. 

     

    The longer you let plantar fasciitis stick around the harder it is to treat.  Be aggressive with your stretching, massage, and ice and it should resolve within a couple weeks.

     

    Hope this helps,

    Dr Walimire

  • BOSNPM We're Not Worthy 2,482 posts since
    Nov 20, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    12. Sep 11, 2013 11:58 AM (in response to DrWalimire)
    running with plantar fasciitis

    Great post Dr!!!!!!!

  • Kflowers29 Rookie 1 posts since
    Apr 23, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    13. Sep 11, 2013 3:38 PM (in response to kurtismoran)
    running with plantar fasciitis

    I have also suffered from plantar fasciitis for the past 10 months. It happened after I ran a 10 miler with tons of hills and got nasty shin splints (I also always wear Asics but tried brooks ghost shoes at that time). I've been doing myofascial release with my PT and that really helped! I've also been stretching my calves twice daily (and after each run) plus I roll my foot on a frozen Gatorade bottle every night. I bought something similar to the arch strap at Walgreens in the as seen on tv section. It helps support the tendon/arch area. Going to see a chiropractor tomorrow for an eval then a massage. You've got some good options out there. I know it can be frustrating (I hated to take time off from running but now I'm training for another 1/2 marathon so the break was totally worth it).

     

    Best of luck!

  • dougrunner Rookie 1 posts since
    Feb 17, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    14. Sep 12, 2013 1:36 PM (in response to kurtismoran)
    running with plantar fasciitis

    I like the reply from Dr. Walimire, but if you're like me it will take more than 2 weeks even if you do everything possible.  Definitely stretching calves and achilles helps.  Hold the stretch for at least 3 minutes.  Few people do this, but it's the only way to truly lengthen the tendon/muscle.

     

    Beyond this I had two main factors in my recovery besides long term rest from running and hiking.  I started wearing foot pads that were ridiculously soft and I regularly did foot strengthening exercises.  These can be as simple as grabbing your socks with your toes.  Some people grab marbles.

     

    The night splint and massage (inlcuding Graston technique) did not do the trick for me.

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