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1890 Views 8 Replies Latest reply: Sep 2, 2013 11:27 AM by lenzlaw
BryanStoudt0 Rookie 3 posts since
Aug 30, 2013
Currently Being Moderated

Aug 30, 2013 8:30 AM

Plan To Make Progress Without Going Crazy

Hi everyone, I'm new to the forum and need some advice.

 

Real quick background - I've been running for about a year and run perhaps 6-12 miles per week (2-3 runs per week) at about a 8:30-9:00 mile/minute pace.  I'd like to see my pace drop, even gradually, but I don't want to run competitively and don't have time to do more than 2-3 runs per week (small kids).

 

Can you guys give me some advice as to next steps?  THANKS in advance!

 

Bryan

  • Kelly1066 Pro 128 posts since
    Jul 12, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Aug 30, 2013 10:22 AM (in response to BryanStoudt0)
    Plan To Make Progress Without Going Crazy

    Hill repeats, interval workouts, tempo runs!  If you can't increase the volume of your running, then increasing the intensity is your best bet. 

     

    You can also consider a jogging stroller if your kids are small enough - it's a great way to get extra running in, it's a core workout and gives you added arm strength, and depending on their age they LOVE it.  I have an 18 month old and an almost 3 year old, and they think going for runs is fantastic as long as I keep it under 40 minutes.  My double jogger is a hand me down with hundreds and hundreds of miles on it, so I suggest looking for a used one because they seem to hold up well and are super expensive new!

     

    Good luck

     

    Kelly





    I write a running blog geared towards other new runners at http://www.iamrunningthis.com!

    Couch to 5K graduate, September 2012

    First 10K, June 2nd, 2013

    First Half Marathon, September 2013

    Twitter: @iamrunningthis

  • SeeFluffyRun Legend 251 posts since
    Sep 2, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Aug 31, 2013 7:13 PM (in response to BryanStoudt0)
    Plan To Make Progress Without Going Crazy

    My brother-in-law gave me this link to a training calculator.  Enter your most recent time for a given race and it will calculate your pace for training for stamina, speed, long distance, anaerobic and endurance.

     

    http://www.5speedrunning.com/pace_calculator.html

     

    HTH





    Graduated C25K 08/09/2009

    Restarted 04/01/2013


    Follow me on my journey: SEEFLUFFYRUN

    Twitter: @SeeFluffyRun

    Facebook: SeeFluffyRun

    Blog: seefluffyrun.blogspot.com

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,412 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. Sep 1, 2013 1:38 PM (in response to SeeFluffyRun)
    Plan To Make Progress Without Going Crazy

    If you can't run more miles, your only choice is to run faster on the miles you do run.  On any run you should be doing a warmup and cooldown of about a mile with speedwork sandwiched in between, whether it's intervals or fartlek or hills or tempo.

     

    Intervals are just periods of faster running, usually over a specified distance (100 meters, 200, 400, etc,.like at a track), followed by a "recovery interval".  Fartlek might be more useful since you just pick a point along your route ("the 3rd telephone pole"), run faster to that point, then slow again. Pick another point and repeat. Hill repeats are kind of like intervals but you pick a hill, run hard up the hill, turn around and run easy back down for recovery.  Turn around and repeat - hard up, easy down.  Tempo is a period of faster running but not as fast as an interval session.  Usually the tempo part of the run should be a minimum of 20 minutes to get the benefit.  You'll probably still get some benefit out of shorter sessions, just not as much.





    Len

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,412 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    6. Sep 1, 2013 8:17 PM (in response to BryanStoudt0)
    Re: Plan To Make Progress Without Going Crazy

    Ground rules:

    - Never add more than one new thing at a time (i.e. intervals or tempo or hills). Add one thing, then do that 3 or 4 weeks before adding the 2nd new thing.

    - Warmup and cooldown should be about 1 mile each (can be more).  The rest of the run can be for a specific workout.

    - No more than 2 hard runs (i.e. speed sessions) per week. Plus a long run if you get to that point.  The long run is also considered a hard run.

    - At least one easy day or rest day between hard runs.

     

    NOTE: You will have to teach yourself pacing to do some of these workouts.

     

    So let us figure you can run a 10K at 9:00 minute pace. (You should be able to.)  That is 55:56 for 10K.  Put that into the pace calculator.  In the chart, "strength reps" and "speed reps" give you times for repeats (aka intervals).  The fast part is a repeat, the recovery an interval.  The whole workout is known generically as repeats or intervals. INTERVALS ARE FAST BUT NOT ALL OUT SPRINTS.   Start with 2 or 3.  Up the number as you feel comfortable.  The recovery times can be longer if you are having problems doing them. Recovery times listed in the table are realtively short.  Typical recommendation is about the same amount of time as the repeat.  If they are too easy, change the time you put into the calculator for the 10K.  An 8:45 pace is 54:22, 8:30 is 52:49, 8:15 is 51:16, 8:00 is 49:43.

     

    Tempo runs are also known as Lactate Threshold (LT) runs.  So in the chart, look for "threshold continuous runs" for your pace, for 10 to 30 minutes.  These can also be done as Tempo Intervals ("threshold reps"), where you run, say, a mile at tempo pace, take a short break st a slower pace, then another mile at tempo pace.

     

    Hills are similar to intervals but you do them on a hill, usually 1/8 to 1/4 mile long, at a hard pace but probably not as hard as the interval pace.  Hills tend to work on leg strength more than intervals do.  Again, start with 2 or 3 and work up from there.

     

    And fartlek is similar to intervals done during a normal run, but you pick the distance and the pace.





    Len

  • Kelly1066 Pro 128 posts since
    Jul 12, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. Sep 2, 2013 10:28 AM (in response to lenzlaw)
    Re: Plan To Make Progress Without Going Crazy

    Thanks for this Len - I am going to be working on my speed after I recover from my half marathon, and this is helpful advice for more than just Bryan!





    I write a running blog geared towards other new runners at http://www.iamrunningthis.com!

    Couch to 5K graduate, September 2012

    First 10K, June 2nd, 2013

    First Half Marathon, September 2013

    Twitter: @iamrunningthis

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,412 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    8. Sep 2, 2013 11:27 AM (in response to Kelly1066)
    Re: Plan To Make Progress Without Going Crazy

    Here's a couple examples.

     

    I run intervals at the local high scool track.  I run there, about 1.5 miles.  Then I do 800 meter repeats (twice around the track), each followed by a 400 meter recovery, very easy, that takes just a little less time than the 800.  I then run the 1.5 miles home.  Total about 6 miles.  On the 4th repeat I may start to feel my legs tiring, which is a sign to stop, or at most do one more.  Right now mine are mostly limited by the time I have available.  Last time I could have done more but had to get home.

     

    Hills are similar.  I have a nice hill and if I run the long way I get a mile in at the top.  The hill is about 1/8 mile long.  The exact distance doesn't matter since I don't time these.  So I go easy down the hill, then run hard up the hill.  Turn around and repeat.  The first one is usually hard, then they tend to get a little easier as your legs adapt some to running uphill.  As with intervals, when they start feeling hard again, it's time to stop or at most do one more.  I typically do 8 to 12 depending on how I feel and how much time I have.

     

    It may take you some time to build up the number of repeats, starting with 2 or 3.  If  you pick a shorter hill, you could do more repeats.  The thing to remember in both cases is that I've been doing these workouts periodically (not necessarily every week) for years.





    Len

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