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5121 Views 11 Replies Latest reply: Jan 22, 2014 8:19 PM by carelessruns RSS
Blueberrykayak Rookie 1 posts since
Dec 14, 2013
Currently Being Moderated

Dec 15, 2013 4:26 AM

I've been trying to do couch to 5k for months

Okay so I joined a gym last year to lose some weight and get in shape. I have tried many classes and because of my hearing problems hate them so I started doing couch to 5k and after a year and quitting for awhile to swim. I after almost a year haven't made it to the end. I've been slowly increasing my really slow speed but I have two problems I can't breath and if I slow down enough so I can I don't even make it 1.5 miles in a half hour. Plus my lower back hurts so much I frequently skip 2 or 3 days between running. I do lift weights pretty regularly.  I've been debating if a personal trainer would help. I never Excersized or participated in any sports because I stunk at them

  • DawnWilliams85 Rookie 1 posts since
    Apr 15, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Dec 15, 2013 6:25 AM (in response to Blueberrykayak)
    I've been trying to do couch to 5k for months

    I'm trying the C25K again as well. I've tried it before but have had to quit for various reasons not related to the program. This time around, per the recommendation of my chiropracter, I've doubled the time of each week. So, each week now takes two weeks. It's making it a LOT easier on my body and my back.

     

    Also, my goal is to finish a 5k faster than last year when I just walked it. So, I don't worry about finishing the length as much as the time. If it says a quarter mile in 3 minutes, I worry about the 3 minutes because I know that I have a shorter stride than most. Then, I keep track of my finish time for a mile and a half, and for a 5k. If they are faster than the previous time, even by 10 seconds, I'm happy.

     

    ~dawn

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,337 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. Dec 15, 2013 5:57 PM (in response to Blueberrykayak)
    I've been trying to do couch to 5k for months

    Blueberry, a personal trainer may very well be able to help you tailor your workouts. For instance, doing weight training that helps strengthen your lower back.  Also you might get help with posture, which could be contributing to your back pain. As for C25K, repeat days/weeks as needed. Distance and speed will come as you progress.





    Len

  • LyricGirl Rookie 4 posts since
    Dec 18, 2013
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Dec 19, 2013 7:45 PM (in response to Blueberrykayak)
    I've been trying to do couch to 5k for months

    I know this is going to sound a little odd, but just keep pushing a little bit more each time. Eventually, you are going to get over the feeling like you're going to suffocate and be able to breathe just fine. I have started running many times myself, and I know you will eventually break through and it will be smooth sailing. Hope this helps.

  • shipo Legend 455 posts since
    Aug 9, 2013
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. Dec 20, 2013 3:52 AM (in response to Blueberrykayak)
    I've been trying to do couch to 5k for months

    Blueberrykayak wrote:

     

    Okay so I joined a gym last year to lose some weight and get in shape. I have tried many classes and because of my hearing problems hate them so I started doing couch to 5k and after a year and quitting for awhile to swim. I after almost a year haven't made it to the end. I've been slowly increasing my really slow speed but I have two problems I can't breath and if I slow down enough so I can I don't even make it 1.5 miles in a half hour. Plus my lower back hurts so much I frequently skip 2 or 3 days between running. I do lift weights pretty regularly.  I've been debating if a personal trainer would help. I never Excersized or participated in any sports because I stunk at them


    If I interpreted your words correctly, it sounds very much like you need to stop worrying about your speed/pace and concentrate on distance.  By running slower and gradually increase your distance, your breathing will not be such a limiting factor, and your lower back will most likely not hurt as much, if at all.  As you add distance, you will gradually strengthen the running related systems of your body (muscles, cardiovascular, connective tissue, bones) without over stressing them, and you'll also gradually teach your body to run with a more efficient stride.  Until you can run say, at least six miles at a shot, don't even think about running at a faster than comfortable pace.

  • SMARIETTA Legend 302 posts since
    Oct 3, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. Dec 20, 2013 5:05 AM (in response to Blueberrykayak)
    I've been trying to do couch to 5k for months

    blueberry,

    if you look on the end of your c25k plan it says  you will be able to run 3 miles  OR 30 minutes.

     

    you won't neccissarily be able to do both.

     

    doing  3 miles in 30 minutes might be something you have to work up to AFTER you have got through the C25k.

     

    As others have suggested- pick one or the other (time or distance)-and for now don't link them together in your mind

     

    when I first did c25k in th 2009 I did it outdoors and I mentally counted the time in my head paying no attention to distance. At" graduation," if I really pushed myself I could do a 5 k in about 35 minutes.

     

    Now I am doing c25k indoors-and I run for distance paying little attention to time

     

    Also- for your back?- if you can it would really help you to get some incredibly rudimentary yoga instruction. there are some really REALLY basic poses that will help your back immensly.

     

    After running I have an extremely simple "yoga" practice I do which helps alot ( table pose, childs pose,table pose,cow pose,cat pose,down dog, table pose...........)

    I go through the whole routine many times holding each EASY position for 5 seconds or so. I do the whole thing for 15-20 mintes and at the end of it I feel great--all stretched out, flexible,yet compact and coordinated.

     

    Very best wishes,

    stephen

  • amyfrey726 Rookie 2 posts since
    Mar 4, 2009

    You could try and see if a running store near you (e.g. Fleet Feet) has a couch to 5k program. I found it helped me get started as I had a group with which to run each week, many at the same level as I was. And, you had homework to do during the week (intervals of walk/run) that prepared you for the next week's group run. The motivation and camaraderie were the push I needed to stick with it. The key to this program is the intervals (begin with about 2 mins walk/2 mins run) and low distance (1.5) - each week the distance increases about 10% and the intervals for running increase by about 1/2 min while the walk intervals either stay the same or get shorter....it works! After doing this program, I was able to complete a 5k without any walk intervals.  Then moved on to longer races after repeating the c25k program another time to hone my "skills"....Good luck.

  • RLBlunt8384 Amateur 20 posts since
    Jan 7, 2014

    To me your post sounds like you have trouble running because you are a bit heavy and are trying to lose weight while increasing your cardio vascular.  I could be wrong but I made that assumption based on your statement about running 1.5 miles in 30 minutes.  I think you need to start your journey towards your goal with a differnent excersice.  If you are a bit on the heavy side, I would suggest doing extremely long walks to get you started.  The key is to keep your heart elivated for extended periods of time.  Or you could do a run/ walk, where you pick a spot in the distance to run to and then you walk for a while, then pick another spot to run to and so forth.  Walking can be very time consuming for sure but if you where walking/ running 5 or six miles a day it would probably be easier on your body.  Then when you are ready to run the whole distance your body will let you know.  The key is time and distance. 

  • GermanHayles Rookie 1 posts since
    Jan 18, 2013
    Currently Being Moderated
    8. Jan 8, 2014 2:11 PM (in response to Blueberrykayak)
    I've been trying to do couch to 5k for months

    A trainer sounds like a good idea to me; especially if the progress is slow.  It's the stuff that we don't know that we don't know that will kill our progress especially in the beginning.

     

     

    Once you've found a trainer, or know someone knowledgeable about fitness I would stick with them for at least 2 or 3 months to get you past wherever you may be stuck.

  • NzAndy Pro 77 posts since
    Oct 23, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    9. Jan 8, 2014 3:04 PM (in response to Blueberrykayak)
    I've been trying to do couch to 5k for months

    Trying to achieve longer distances takes a lot of smaller efforts.  I'd say keep doing a shorter distance up to a mile or so a few times a week as you're able to until it becomes easier.  Particularly with running, it's better to get your volume through several smaller efforts that stimulate without being so long that they start to break you down.  Running has a long build time, and in the process you'll find other things that need work to support this like your lower back.  For me, my issue is flexibility so I spend a fair amount of time working on that instead.  As mentioned earlier, yoga is great because it gets a lot of cross training issues at one time.

     

    A common mistake with endurance racing is to always try to go long on each training run.  Don't expect to be able to do this.  When training for a half marathon my runs are 3 times a week from 2.5 to 4 miles each.  Every second or third week I'll go longer on a 4th run.  Just always pay attention to your personal issues and work with them while you do short efforts to stimulate getting stronger.  This will work, and a trainer should be able to help you with this if you decide to hire one. 

     

    Lots of good suggestions on this thread, hopefully you'll break through and tell us how successful you've become soon.

    Andy

  • Haselsmasher Legend 507 posts since
    May 25, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    10. Jan 8, 2014 7:24 PM (in response to Blueberrykayak)
    I've been trying to do couch to 5k for months

    Lots of good info here.  At the risk of information overload I'll suggest.......

     

    ....that you consider somehow assessing how you're running - what many people call form.  There is great debate as to what the "right" form is, but there are a few things you might think about or consider:

    *  Taking long strides can cause issues.  Generally speaking it's better to take shorter steps more frequently than longer steps with a slower cadence.

    *  If you do the first bullet, you'll likely be having your feet land close to your hips.  If you look down at your feet you'll be able to get a glimpse at them.  They won't be out in front of you.

    *  Stand up pretty straight.  Many folks will say "run tall".  Don't bend over at the waist.

    *  Foot strike gets an inordinate amount of attention.  IMHO if you do the above things the foot strike doesn't matter much - at least not for now.

     

    I've also found, after many many years of being injured that I need to do other exercises to keep me in shape for running.  Basically running is great for developing forward movement.  It does basically nothing to promote or strengthen lateral movement - because you're not moving laterally.  However key stabilization muscles in the hip are exercised with lateral movement.  So if only running these muscles can go on vacation, then do poorly at stabilizing the hip, which can mean all sorts of other issues.

    *  So look at hip strengthening such as one-legged squats.  They don't have to be deep.  My PT also has me putting a TheraBand around my ankles and then doing side-steps - in both directions.  It's amazing how sore my hips get doing this.

    *  Make sure you're working your core; crunches and back extensions.

     

    Jim





    http://jimhaselmaier.blogspot.com/


    "Kick off your high heel sneakers, it's party time."

    -- From the song FM by Steely Dan

  • carelessruns Rookie 4 posts since
    Jan 22, 2014
    Currently Being Moderated
    11. Jan 22, 2014 8:19 PM (in response to Haselsmasher)
    I've been trying to do couch to 5k for months

    as a fellow newbie to running, would strongly suggest to just walk for 30 minutes, for few weeks, instead of the regular run/walk program.

    just get used to stand on your feet for 30 minutes, and take it from there

    once comfortable, you can start the run/walk program. also, if you are unable to keep pace with the program that you are referring, you can always repeat the last session, nobody is going to scold you for that

    have faith , keep the ball rolling

     

    http://carelessruns.wordpress.com

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