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1937 Views 7 Replies Latest reply: Jan 10, 2014 3:20 PM by SoDough03
freetshirts Amateur 8 posts since
Jun 1, 2009
Currently Being Moderated

Jan 9, 2014 9:17 AM

Recurring hip pain

Hi all,

 

I hurt my right hip while overtraining for a half marathon over the summer. Saw a PT and an ortho, was told it was nothing serious, got some exercises, but mostly I needed to rest. Have not run at all since October, and the pain had gone away while sitting, walking, standing, etc. But I tried going for a run yesterday, and within 1/2 a mile, the pain was right back. Today, it hurts even when walking.

 

Any ideas? Am I dumb for thinking three months off was enough healing time? Or could there be something bigger wrong here if it hasn't healed?

 

Thanks for any thoughts or advice!

 

Danielle

  • shipo Legend 499 posts since
    Aug 9, 2013
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Jan 9, 2014 10:39 AM (in response to freetshirts)
    Recurring hip pain

    The thing with hip pain is that there are so very many reasons why one might suffer from pains in the hip, and diagnosing, or even opining for that matter, will be about as accurate as predicting the next roll of the dice.

     

    I've had on-again/off-again hip pain which has never been diagnosed, and while running does sometimes seem to aggravate it, other times I feel wonderful, even after runs up in the 15-20 mile range.  The above said, over the last 24 years since the pain first showed up when I was training for triathlons in 1990, there have been many times when, due to work pressures and/or injury, the I wasn't running at all, and I still had the on-again/off-again pain in my hip; maybe even more often (but less severe) than I have now that I'm putting in 200+ miles per month.

     

    Do the two of us have torn labrums, or hip flexor issues, or gait problems, or an inappropriate position for our car seat or desk chair?  Who the hell knows?  I figure I'm going to keep doing what I'm doing, and if it gets bad enough, I'll have a professional or two look at it in the hopes it should be fairly easy to diagnose. 





    Fat old man PRs:

    • 1-mile (point to point, gravity assist): 5:50
    • 2-mile: 13:49
    • 5K (gravity assist last mile): 21:31
    • 5-Mile: 37:24
    • 10K (first 10K of my Half Marathon): 48:16
    • 10-Mile (first 10 miles of my Half Marathon): 1:17:40
    • Half Marathon: 1:42:13
  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,431 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. Jan 9, 2014 5:08 PM (in response to freetshirts)
    Recurring hip pain

    Maybe it's time for a second opinion (doctor).  And hopefully you'll get ideas from some of the more knowledgable people who post here.  I wonder what "overtraining" you did that you think caused your hip pain.  Also, have you been religiously doing the exercises they gave you?  I had a bad ankle sprain a number of years ago and I still do exercises targeted specifically at the ankles.  If I stop doing them for a few weeks, the ankle starts to act up.





    Len

  • Damien Howell Legend 312 posts since
    Feb 27, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Jan 10, 2014 7:32 AM (in response to freetshirts)
    Recurring hip pain

    If the problem occurs with running, someone who knows about running form and mechanics needs to look at you run.  A slow motion video analysis of you running that views the whole body from back side, side view and front view can idenitfy movement faults.  Once movement faults are identified gait training can occur to modify the movement faults.  A very common movement fault assocaited withs hip pain is taking too long a stride or step. 

    Damien Howell PT, DPT, OCS

    www.damienhowellpt.com

  • JamesJohnsonLMT Legend 1,167 posts since
    Aug 23, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. Jan 10, 2014 10:49 AM (in response to freetshirts)
    Re: Recurring hip pain

    You're not "dumb" for thinking 3 months was long enough to heal. Most people would expect improvement in that amount of time (many sports injuries are completely healed in three months). The problem is, that certain muscular syndromes do not respond to rest alone. Some get worse with rest, or remain the same. The key word in the initial opinion was "mostly" rest.

     

    You are right on the money, that you overtrained by pushing the schedule ahead of your ankle injury. The hip muscles could have been overactive while trying to compensate for, and protect, that ankle. I'm sure you are feeling the results now. Shipo mentioned different possibilities, but I will guarantee that twisting the hip around a tender ankle (even if you were not aware of it) can send rotator muscles into pain orbit, and hypersensitive core muscles like these often produce severe hip pain. This pain can continue for years, and is hard to control because these muscles are deep and sometimes inaccessible. It may take a while to rehab them.

     

    As Damien suggested, a long "athletic" stride can turn you into a non-athlete real fast. See Galloway on that. I'm not sure if you would have a valid analysis of your original gait after all this overcompensation, but it would certainly show how messed up things have become. With care, your original gait may return, however flawed it may have been, or you may be stuck with a new one for a while. Yes, it will need to be retrained, by a professional, to prevent further injury.

     

    In my opinion, the 1st medical opinion you got was correct. Initially, it was probably not a serious injury at all. What made it more serious, was forming a new injury (hip) by not letting the last one (ankle) heal, and continuing to train through the pain. The "second opinion," and any after that, must take that error on your part into account. Just don't make the mistake of collecting opinions until you find one you like. There are practitioners out there who prey upon weekend warriors' fears of serious injury. It can be quite liberating to hear that you can't run, because that releases you from whatever drives you to prepare for competition. Sports psychology works both ways. Don't let it work against your health.

  • SoDough03 Rookie 1 posts since
    Jan 10, 2014
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. Jan 10, 2014 3:20 PM (in response to shipo)
    Recurring hip pain

    [quote]

    The thing with hip pain is that there are so very many reasons why one might suffer from pains in the hip, and diagnosing, or even opining for that matter, will be about as accurate as predicting the next roll of the dice.

     

    I've had on-again/off-again hip pain which has never been diagnosed, and while running does sometimes seem to aggravate it, other times I feel wonderful, even after runs up in the 15-20 mile range.  The above said, over the last 24 years since the pain first showed up when I was training for triathlons in 1990, there have been many times when, due to work pressures and/or injury, the I wasn't running at all, and I still had the on-again/off-again pain in my hip; maybe even more often (but less severe) than I have now that I'm putting in 200+ miles per month.

     

    Do the two of us have torn labrums, or hip flexor issues, or gait problems, or an inappropriate position for our car seat or desk chair?  Who the hell knows?  I figure I'm going to keep doing what I'm doing, and if it gets bad enough, I'll have a professional or two look at it in the hopes it should be fairly easy to diagnose.[/quote]

     

    This post is pretty accurate. I used to get hip pain over and over, it was because of my weight though actually and the stress I put on it when I worked.

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