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727 Views 7 Replies Latest reply: Jul 30, 2014 8:48 PM by JamesJohnsonLMT
goatman69 Amateur 9 posts since
Nov 9, 2009
Currently Being Moderated

Jul 25, 2014 5:21 PM

Odd Blister

Been getting these blisters on the side of my feet. It is worse on my left foot, and I normally feel them heating up around mile 3. Going to try some different socks. Anybody else experience these, and what helped?  Thanks

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  • shipo Legend 499 posts since
    Aug 9, 2013
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Jul 25, 2014 5:45 PM (in response to goatman69)
    Odd Blister

    I used to get those back when I was first running in like, uhhh, 1970 and 1971; back in the day I would lather petroleum jelly on the side of my foot before each run and that seemed to help until my foot toughened up enough.





    Fat old man PRs:

    • 1-mile (point to point, gravity assist): 5:50
    • 2-mile: 13:49
    • 5K (gravity assist last mile): 21:31
    • 5-Mile: 37:24
    • 10K (first 10K of my Half Marathon): 48:16
    • 10-Mile (first 10 miles of my Half Marathon): 1:17:40
    • Half Marathon: 1:42:13
  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,431 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. Jul 25, 2014 6:14 PM (in response to goatman69)
    Re: Odd Blister

    Seems like we've had this discussion before.  As for socks, are they cotton?  Do they have a loose fit?  Either could cause problems.  Check the fit of your shoes, for width particularly.  Sizing can be a real pain, varying shoe-to-shoe, and brand and model.  Make sure you check the size standing, since the weight on your feet makes them spread a little.  You really don't want the shoe too snug.  Plus your feet grow slightly during the run.  Also as you age your feet grow a little, and what fit last year may not quite fit this year.  Over the years I've gone from wearing an 11 to a 12 - 12.5.  Look for anything on the inside of the shoe that might rub and irritate, or possibly something that the sock may snag on, even a slightly sticky surface.





    Len

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,431 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. Jul 26, 2014 7:11 AM (in response to goatman69)
    Re: Odd Blister

    Which tends to implicate the shoe or maybe the inserts (insole).  I have had similar blisters (a little more on the sole) in certain shoes which I never quite figured out - some combination of socks and insole and shoe.  But they only showed up around the half-marathon point or beyond.  Varying results with different socks and aftermarket insoles (even cheap ones).  No problem in other shoes.  The problem was, those were my marathon shoes.  Another possibility is the opposite of what I implied above about fit.  If the shoes are a little too big (length or width) your feet may be sliding around in them, enough to cause a blister.  In that case you may be able to adjust the lacing to fix the problem. 

     

    OR ... If you got a new shoe with less control, you may be pronating more, pushing that part of your foot against the side of the shoe.

     

    Anyway, a few things to consider.





    Len

  • JamesJohnsonLMT Legend 1,167 posts since
    Aug 23, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. Jul 26, 2014 9:11 PM (in response to goatman69)
    Odd Blister

    I agree with Len that you may be overpronating, based on the medial location of blisters on the ball of the foot, and formerly in the arch. Shoes and orthotics alone cannot cure this condition. Some use barefoot strengthening techniques to improve the arch, and others physical therapy or pilates, etc. With luck, you may find a shoe that cradles the arch in a way that delays blistering, but shoes change from time to time, even within the same make & model. Time to address the cause, not the symptom.

  • JamesJohnsonLMT Legend 1,167 posts since
    Aug 23, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. Jul 30, 2014 8:48 PM (in response to goatman69)
    Odd Blister

    If you weigh more than you did in academy, and are running to lose weight, it could explain why things are different now.

     

    An increase in weight tends to flatten the arch, possibly leading to arch blisters with shoes that may have fit well before.

     

    A flattened arch destabilizes the ankle, and triggers an increase in pronation in order to increase stability. This would focus more pressure on the inside (medial) aspect of the foot, particularly at the ball of the foot (1st metatarsal head), the strongest part of the forefoot.

     

    Weight increase is not the only explanation for a gradual change in running form, but probably the most common. Accumulated injuries and adaptation to pain are others.

     

    I hope the socks work out for decreasing friction, and you can find a shoe that does not interfere too much with your natural biomechanics. It's the same you, but different circumstances. As you have found, doing battle with nature can be fun, but the results are not always pleasant.

     

    If weight increase is the cause, the problem should go away with the weight, and your arch and academy biomechanics may return. You may need to move from "curved last" shoes to straights during this time, and back to curved later when things improve.

     

    In the meantime, study up on arch height, and remember that impact sports like running often triple the force applied to your arch and foot.

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