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434 Views 3 Replies Latest reply: Aug 2, 2014 7:47 PM by lenzlaw
BonnieSmerk Rookie 1 posts since
Nov 22, 2013
Currently Being Moderated

Jul 31, 2014 4:04 AM

how to tell  the diffrent from achilles tendonits or planter fasciitis

I been training for akron full marathon than day after hills long run i got this pain back heel and front. that was 3 week ago .I my foot doctor last week did not really said what my injury was. just got x-ray done and was pain med. Kt has help lot. I wish did not have 4 week heard what dr has to said. after reading running injury online i have narrow down either achilles tendonis or planter fasciitts. do peolpe know diffrent? I like keep training for akron marathon and little less 2 mouth away. thanks

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,413 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008

    USUALLY -

     

    Plantar fasciitis hurts on the bottom of the foot, in the arch and toward the back of the arch.  The classic test was to press hard in the bottom middle of the heel bone.

     

    Achilles tendonosis hurts on the back of the ankle, possibly extending into the calf, depending on the extent and exact location of the injury.  If this is your injury, train cautiously.  You don't want to make it worse.  (http://www.nismat.org/patients/injury-evaluation-treatment/lower-body/eccentric-training-for-treatment-of-achilles-tendinosis)





    Len

  • justamaniac Legend 202 posts since
    May 30, 2007

    Having suffered with both of those ailments I can very accurately tell you the difference.  To confirm what lenzlaw noted, PF affected me on the bottom of my foot and seemed worse when I first got out of bed or was sitting for a period of time. AT affected my ability to walk most all of the time - it was a nagging ache between my heel and calf that I felt with every step. In my case I could definitely feel tenderness in my Achilles area.

     

    If you have AT, do not make any attempts to stretch it out - that just makes it worse.  The converse it true for PF. Stretching helped and I could run with PF. If you have AT, rest it as much as possible, ice (to control swelling), and massage (to encourage blood flow). If it hurts to run, DONT run. If you are lucky, you can get past your AT in about a week to 10 days... (I know... you are right at the height of your training...). As you ramp up your miles again ice immediately after every run. Just note that if you aggravate your Achilles tendon more than it is now you will really, really be in sorry shape and have a crummy marathon.  Rest it up, arrive at the starting line as healthy as possible and be prepared to walk some if necessary.  A friend of mine snapped his Achilles tendon and wound up in a lot of pain and off his feet for weeks...

     

    best of luck!

    -b

    runningthrutime.blogspot.com

     


  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,413 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008

    It's not always clear cut, which is why I said "usually".  I had a burning-type pain (both feet) right where the heel turns to go up into the achilles.  I couldn't figure it out.  It wasn't on the bottom of my foot and it wasn't up into the achilles.  I was able to run, slowly and carefully.  The podiatrist I saw insisted it was PF, but it didn't feel like the PF I had before.  He gave me a cortisone shot which helped some for about 2 days.  I never figured out what it was and it took several months to get rid of it.  I actually used a foam roller, which is hard to do in that location.





    Len

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