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3873 Views 37 Replies Latest reply: May 7, 2008 11:48 AM by urano RSS Go to original post 1 2 3 Previous Next
  • figbash Amateur 600 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    15. Dec 22, 2007 9:46 AM (in response to urano)
    Re: Increasing distance till ...?

    quote:


    Originally posted by xCarsonx:

    I know I am relatively new to running and this forum, but why would you try to convince someone to not run a marathon based on the fact that it might cause heart damage then turn around and state that you don't even believe it?


    I heard there is even evidence that you should not attempt to post on this forum unless you have 6 years of base training behind you.

    [http://This message has been edited by xCarsonx (edited May-17-2007).|http://This message has been edited by xCarsonx (edited May-17-2007).]


     



    Wow.

    First of all, I mentioned the study to re-enforce my position that a solid base is important before training for a marathon. Secondly, I never said that I don't believe the article I merely stated that I plan on running more MPW when training for my next marathon.

    Now, do you have something constructive to contribute to this thread or are you content to just pick away at what others have provided?

    Tom

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    My Profile[/URL" target="_blank">
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  • Tracy Lightfoot Rookie 94 posts since
    Oct 27, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    17. May 17, 2007 6:25 PM (in response to urano)
    Re: Increasing distance till ...?

    urano -- I agree that's probably your best bet. A half is a nice distance, and requires a decent amount of training. For me, the marathon condundrum lies less on if I can physically accomplish it, but more on if I have the time and committment for a training program. Training for my first half introduced me to the level of work I'd need to put in every week for weeks on end, and I was able to remind myself a marathon would require me to almost double what I was doing. (I was averaging 28-35 mpw.)

    So I won't even full with the physical side of things, because I think the mental aspect is just as important.

    As far as speedwork/fartleks/tempos ... A lot of HM plans will include them, but they're not necessary. If you want to work in a session with some sort of speed emphasis one night a week or once every two weeks, it would help improve your time. But, it's not necessary at all. If you're not worried about it that much, or you just don't feel like doing it, don't bother.

    Good luck!

  • rnrrob Rookie 20 posts since
    May 5, 2005
    Currently Being Moderated
    18. May 18, 2007 9:50 AM (in response to urano)
    Re: Increasing distance till ...?

    I am confused.  How much more of a base do you need?  Right now urano is running about 25 miles a week and has been running for 6 months.  That is a pretty good base as far as I am concerned and could easily get you to a 40 miles per week in 5 months, which is approximately what most beginner marathon training plans call for at their peak, right?   Thus, I think you are fine and you should go for it.

    Clearly, you have been training smart if you are only uping your milage by 10% a week.  However, weekly milage is not all that is important because one must also do a long run.  Are you doing a long run?  To check your progress try shortening a couple of you midweek runs and do a longer one over the weekend.  This can be done without increasing your milage.

  • RunForFun001 Pro 626 posts since
    Jan 25, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    20. May 18, 2007 2:58 PM (in response to urano)
    Re: Increasing distance till ...?

    Sure you can keep increasing your mileage in small manageable chucks and you should be fine.

    I would suggest getting to 5 days a week - If it is manageable

    I would suggest doing a variety of runs -
    M - Easy 45 minutes or add a little speed or hills
    T - Easy 30 minutes
    W - Fartlek - Total 45 minutes (Or a simple tempo run)
    TH - Off
    FR - Easy 30 minutes
    SA - Easy 90 minutes
    Sunday - Off

    Keep TU and FR easy and short (Maybe up to 40 minutes)- add time to M-W-SA. Saturday could be build to 2 hours, but I would rather see it become 30% of you total mileage 1st.

    Just an idea.

    SA could build to 2 hours, but I would try to get

  • littlewaywelt Rookie 182 posts since
    Apr 1, 2005
    Currently Being Moderated
    21. May 21, 2007 9:21 AM (in response to urano)
    Re: Increasing distance till ...?

    If you train smartly and listen to your body, you can easilly complete a fall marathon.  It might hurt a little, it might hurt a lot, it might not hurt at all.  ...but it's totally doable.  I'm of the camp that thinks marathon difficulty is vastly over-estimated and over-reported when it comes to simply completing a marathon without walking.

  • mrinertia Pro 1,310 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    22. May 22, 2007 10:56 AM (in response to urano)
    Re: Increasing distance till ...?

    Your body, your training, your goals, your call. I'll share my experience. I started running March of last year and made decent progress quickly and REALLY wated to run a marathon within a year. When the time came, I was only doing 25-30 MPW and didn't feel up to the task. I postponed a fall marathon last year, figuring I'd do a spring marathon this year and postponed that one as well. I've twice overextended myself on a long run and it felt like I had been hit by a car both times. I am unwilling to put myself through that over such an extended distance. I have no regrets about my postponements as now I have a really good base, averaging 40 MPW now and am going to be really well prepared for a fall marathon this year. That's my experience, nothing more nothing less.

    Part of your decision will stem from your motivation. I think if this is something you want to do to cross it off your life's "to do" list, you'll probably go for it. If you are looking to make running a lifetime activity with many miles and many marathons ahead of you, you'll probably wait until you're a bit better prepared. That's my opinion which means absolutely nothing in the cosmic scheme of things.

    If you really want to do it, do it. Respect the distance, train as well as you can and let us know how it goes. Best of luck, either way.

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    42

  • mrinertia Pro 1,310 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    24. May 24, 2007 9:15 PM (in response to urano)
    Re: Increasing distance till ...?

    quote:


    Originally posted by urano:

    Thanks again for your feedback
    @mrinertia, more than to do a marathon "to cross it off my life's to do list," as you put it, I see it more like a kind of "natural goal". Somehow in just a few months I've learned to love running, and I want to keep enjoying this experience as much and as long as possible. I'm with you in running the marathon once I consider I'm ready. Right now with 30 MPW and a long run just below 2 hours, I know I'm not there yet. So, as I posted earlier, will keep with my +10% weekly, doing a few short races this summer 10K-10M, and then we'll see whether I feel ready for a marathon in autumn or, most likely, for a HM, and leave the big thing for next spring ....either way I'll keep you posted !http://www.coolrunning.com/forums/smile.gif|src=http://www.coolrunning.com/forums/smile.gif|border=0!


     



    Good philosophy. You and I come from a similar place. I wanted to do one within a year for two reasons. Firstly, it was the natural extension of things. 3 miles, then 5 then 8 etc. will eventually end up in a 26.2. The second reason was simple braggin rights. Personally I hit a point when progress became harder on an exponential level as opposed to the linear progress I had been making. I've postponed twice, originally intending a fall last year then a spring this year. In all honesty, I'm glad. When I do my fall marathon, I'll be able to turn in what I consider a respectable time for a first marathon as opposed to "just finishing".

    Again, good luck, whatever your decision. Train well and respect the distance. Keep us posted; we'd like to hear how things turn out for you.

  • dg12002 Expert 614 posts since
    Aug 26, 2003
    Currently Being Moderated
    25. May 28, 2007 7:28 AM (in response to urano)
    Re: Increasing distance till ...?

    There's lots of people who have done marathons within their first year, I did 4 myself. The following years have been different as far as injuries inclluding the 5 month besetting shin splints.

    Why hurry, I recommend minimum 1 yrs of mid distance. When marathon training build up very slowly over a longer schedule with PLATEAUING.

  • runawayjesse Rookie 538 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    27. May 28, 2007 2:27 PM (in response to urano)
    Re: Increasing distance till ...?

    If I were you I would spend the rest of this year just increasing mileage. Keep at it consistantly. Next fall get a feel for the race scene and jump into a few more 5-10k's. Stop increasing mileage for a few months and add a day of tempo and perhaps a day of interval's or hills. Mess around and see what workouts "work" for you. Aim to set new PR's in distances from 5-10k. This way you get a feel for what kind of a runner you are. You can work on your weakneses and honor your strengths. Next winter go back to increasing mileage but this time perhaps you can keep a few workouts in your routine....you know the ones that just seem to "make you".  This is the kind of preperation that I did for 3 years and now I'm finally training for my first marathon. I learned many things about myself as a runner that now allow me to train saftely and comfortably for the marathon. 2.5 years ago marathon training probebly would have killed me and I don't  think I would have enjoyed the race much. Today I have enough knowledge to put together my own training to suit my own needs.

    I guess my advice is to be patient. Race shorter distances. Constantly keep this idea in your head "build up, build up". Everything you do today weather it be racing, workouts, or even jogging will play a key roll in the grand scheme of things. Mileage gives you endurance, 5-10k's give you power. Run hills, lift weights, do yoga whatever contributes to building fitness FOR YOU.

    I think too many people believe that marathon training is the ultimate guide to fitness. The cram da la cram of race distances. I have meet more out of shape newbie marathoners than I have couch potatoes.

    Take your time and join me for the long haul...

  • maryt091 Pro 781 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    28. May 28, 2007 7:00 PM (in response to urano)
    Re: Increasing distance till ...?

    quote:


    Originally posted by urano:

    Sorry, but PLATEAUING means ....?
    Thx


     


    Plateauing means staying at the same level for a while without increasing.

    Basically, it's a good idea to stop increasing your distance and/or speed for a while and even to take a step back, to allow your body to catch up with your training. Lots of things happen when you first start to run - not only do you build more muscle, you also build more capillaries, your heart gets stronger, lots going on. It helps to let your body get accustomed to the new workload and even take a step back now and them to allow your body to spend some time rebulding and making more capillaries, more muscle, etc. All the new building takes place during rest periods, and your body can't do that as efficiently if you are continuallly trying to run more every week.

    My advice on the marathon would be to hold off until you have at least run a half marathon, and probably not try for a marathon this fall.  One problem with marathons today is that you often have to sign up months in advance and once you have paid your entry fee, it's very hard psychologically to back out even if you know in your heart you aren't ready yet.  You may be one of those people who has no problem running a marathon first year running, sounds like you went pretty easily for 5K to 15K, but it's still too soon to tell if you'll be ready for a marathon in the fall.  Get comfortable first with running half marathons and 25k to 30K if you can find them, and then try for the marathon.

  • kuan Rookie 34 posts since
    Apr 3, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    29. May 28, 2007 10:47 PM (in response to urano)
    Re: Increasing distance till ...?

    So if you have a good strong heart already from cycling centuries and skiing marathons you can increase distance more quickly as long as the rest of your body holds up?  Can I assume that?

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