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6862 Views 52 Replies Latest reply: Nov 15, 2010 12:41 AM by jmswlsn77 RSS Go to original post 1 2 3 4 Previous Next
  • Tetsujin30 Legend 945 posts since
    Jan 1, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    15. Mar 22, 2007 6:56 PM (in response to Tamalina)
    Re: If you were an activist

    hey, wait just a minute madam tamadam,
    me too but maybe let’s hear the moderators’ decision first.

    In the meantime, I hope this isn’t too slow, . . . as usual for me with anything about running )

    (1) more reduced entry fees for seniors

    (2) no time penalties or fouls for barefooting[/URL" target="_blank"> in Ironmans,

    (3) mandatory race reports for PR’s and to glean helpful tidbits from the fasties.

    thanx.

  • Dark Horse Legend 1,684 posts since
    Oct 9, 2005
    Currently Being Moderated
    16. Mar 22, 2007 8:09 PM (in response to Tamalina)
    Re: If you were an activist

    I think this topic is fine. I think any topic is fine. I'm just a mellow relaxed guy when it comes to standards of online discourse.

    I don't know if my answer qualifies as a cause, but I've often thought I might enjoy working for one of those credit-counseling agencies that helps people organize their finances after they've run up too much credit-card debt, got over their heads with a mortgage, or got into some other financial hot water. It's low-paid work, but honorable, and the need for help is great. I think I'd be compassionate to my clients and good at the job, if I could avoid getting depressed.

    Dark Horse

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    I'm a dark horse, running on a dark race course

  • Flyin Hawaiian Legend 383 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    17. Mar 22, 2007 8:20 PM (in response to Tamalina)
    Re: If you were an activist

    Tammy, GREAT TOPIC!

    Animal rights for me. I was thinking of volunteering at the MSPCA.

    Laurie

    ----



    "Continuous effort - not strength or intelligence - is the key to unlocking our potential”  Winston Churchill

  • jebsmythe Legend 702 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    18. Mar 22, 2007 8:46 PM (in response to Tamalina)
    Re: If you were an activist

    Three things I never discuss in public:  politics, religion, and which running shoes are the best.  !http://www.coolrunning.com/forums/wink.gif|src=http://www.coolrunning.com/forums/wink.gif|border=0!

    That being said, what irks me most lately is the huge differential between the salaries of CEOs and the average salary of their workforce.

  • FlyingFinn080 Legend 613 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    19. Mar 22, 2007 9:08 PM (in response to Tamalina)
    Re: If you were an activist

    Save the moss...and polar bears and oceans and coral reefs...

  • RunstheBitterroot Legend 591 posts since
    Aug 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    20. Mar 22, 2007 9:30 PM (in response to Tamalina)
    Re: If you were an activist



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    My Photo's[/URL" target="_blank"> "If you see a man running up a mountain trail in Montana with a fly pole attached to his back, you are probably lost. LDD

  • Jim24315 Legend 1,987 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    21. Mar 22, 2007 10:18 PM (in response to Tamalina)
    Re: If you were an activist

    I tend to agree with nighthawk42 "the idea for Boomers and Beyond was to discuss running related issues for Masters Runner"...BUT....of all the chatter I've seen around these parts having nothing to do with runnng, it seems unfair to make this the one where we draw the line. This is an interesting and worthwhile topic even though it might be more appropriate for the clubhouse. I understand where Tammy is coming from, though. The people she knows are over here and not in the clubhouse.

    My pick would be heatlh care for everyone. It seems criminal that a country with all the wealth that ours has will let people suffer and die who could be helped if only they had enough money.

    The global warming issue ranks very high on my list too. Most people will have to get hit right between the eyes, and hit hard too, before they will wake up though.

  • runnerbythesea Amateur 15 posts since
    Aug 9, 2004
    Currently Being Moderated
    22. Mar 22, 2007 11:32 PM (in response to Tamalina)
    Re: If you were an activist

    Actually, I see this thread as okay.  We are runners, but we are also intriguing people as well.  When we run, we think about things.  Runners are a unique group and the research supports that we can grow brain cells through vigorous aerobic exercise, so why not introduce those newbie cells to new and interesting thoughts.

    Anyway, my issue is that Americans watch too much television and allow themselves to become persuaded and "sheep-like" in their behaviors as a result. T.V. seems to program the mind to think a certain way and act accordingly. I have seen children who are scarily bizarre and THAT worries me. Research claims that children watch about 30 hours of TV a week.

    I have not watched a single T.V show in 3 years (I don't own a TV) and I find that I haven't missed anything. Someone tested me the other day and mentioned a famous T.V. person's name and I said, "Who?" They were amazed and said, "Yep, you don't watch T.V." I'm waiting for the day when some famous TV personality sits next to me and I ignore them innocently.

    Also, global warming is a strong possibility and it should not be ignored.  Are there too many people in the world or is it that there are too many people in the world who are clueless and don't care about the environment.

  • SMP Legend 1,297 posts since
    Sep 29, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    23. Mar 23, 2007 7:34 AM (in response to Tamalina)
    Re: If you were an activist

    Education is a sore point with me. Granted parents need to have an active role in development. We get too busy or some other nonsense. We look at our shcool's agenda for our kids and use that as a guide. I'm very guilty of that. now, two kids are out of high school, DD1 & DD2. DD1 has finished a two year training course and has a job in her field. DD#2  graduated in the top 10 of her class and is doing well in GVSU. DD#3 is graduating this spring. DS has 2 years left. No where down the line has any one taught these kids how to balance their checking accounts. Pay their bills each month. Reconcile anything. Their math ain't got no numbers in it any more and applied basics is over their heads. I've made a habbit of getting the bills out in front of them and doing my home work. Many graduates have no idea what a budget is. Our fault people. Where do the kids learn personal accountability? Responsibility? Morality? Respect? Teens are rebelious. Sweet. Shake up the satus quo a bit. When they're clueless too, we're in trouble folks.
    Now when looking at the school's student agenda, I try to find what's missing and fill in the blanks. Today, I look at what kind of man I'd like DS to become and work at modeling that behavior.

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    Today is the day, SteveP

    My User Profile[/URL" target="_blank">

  • pmcneb Community Moderator 582 posts since
    Jan 10, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    24. Mar 23, 2007 7:35 AM (in response to Tamalina)
    Re: If you were an activist

    Why would anyone step foot in the clubhouse? Those folks are brutal and very often rude over there. If the B&B formu were similar to them,I owuld be out of here in a flash.

    That said, my concern is obesity and the ensuing health issues which end up costing all of us more money.. It ties quite nicely to lack of exercise and that then ties to running.

  • Karl Rysted Legend 512 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    25. Mar 23, 2007 8:43 AM (in response to Tamalina)
    Re: If you were an activist

    You say "if" like it's a hypothetical.  Some people would say I've been an activist since I was 18.  I could write a book on this topic, and in fact I probably will about my yellow ribbon project, if and when it's completed.

  • roy c Legend 452 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    26. Mar 23, 2007 9:02 AM (in response to Tamalina)
    Re: If you were an activist

    Great thread.
    I would like to see 'Hydrogenated Fats' made illegal.
    I would like to see the USA get a National Health Service
    I would like the opportunity to vote for Hilary. ( I suppose I was doing well till then)    !http://www.coolrunning.com/forums/biggrin.gif|src=http://www.coolrunning.com/forums/biggrin.gif|border=0!
    Roy

  • Tramps031 Legend 735 posts since
    Oct 31, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    27. Dec 22, 2007 8:08 PM (in response to Tamalina)
    Re: If you were an activist

    Some varied thoughts on an interesting topic.  Thanks for starting it Tammy.  Please forgive the ridiculous length; it’s something I’ve thought a lot about.

    1. As others have noted, it’s interesting how the idea that non-running topics shouldn’t be allowed only comes up with politics, never with gardening, pets, or other off-topic subjects. I think as a separate thread that people can choose to read or not, it’s fine.

    2. I once had a graduate assistant who was from Sweden. She had only been in the US for a semester when she was assigned to one of my classes. Just before the semester started, I took her out for coffee to get acquainted and asked about her initial impressions of life in America, etc. After pausing a moment, she said something like, “I was very surprised that, in the US, people talk about religion and say they’re ‘praying’ for things all the time, but they treat politics as a private personal matter that shouldn’t be discussed. In Sweden, religion is a private personal matter that is not discussed and politics is what you talk about with everyone you meet.” That may be oversimplifying, but it is consistent with much research about some of the distinctive features of American culture.

    3. For a country intent on promoting democracy (which is “politics,” after all!) abroad, we have a pretty tenuous relationship to it at home. Our society greatly values liberty—freedom to individually do as we please, freedom from government interference, low taxes, freedom of speech, civil rights, property rights, etc. But we often forget that a functioning democracy (politics again!) sets the conditions for liberty (protecting against foreign intruders, maintaining law and order, limiting the power of government, regulating corporate behavior, ameliorating the extremes of capitalism, etc.) Liberty is ultimately about private happiness; it’s about individual rights and freedoms. Democracy is about engaging with our fellow citizens to work for some collective good; it’s about civic engagement, political action, public life. The irony is that you can’t have liberty without democracy. The minute people retreat from politics and give up on democracy is the moment we lose our liberty.

    4.We live in a deeply divided country. Our culture is not very good about fostering civil dialogue regarding political issues. I think part of our current divisiveness and lack of civility comes precisely because we don’t talk enough about politics—especially with people whose views are different from our own. Too often, we use clichés and bumper-sticker philosophy to oversimplify issues and create unnecessary divides. All those shout-fest TV and radio programs that purport to be discussing the issues of the day are certainly a poor model. We need more forums (like this?) to have civil, respectful dialogue.

    5. The first thing I thought when I saw “

    If

    you were an activist” was, “What makes you assume we’re not?”  I suspect a number of people here are involved in a variety of ways that could be considered activism.  By “activism” I mean efforts to promote social change, as distinct from charity.  Charity is fine and necessary but it doesn’t address the underlying conditions that produce social illswhich is a much more controversial effort.  Brazilian Catholic Archbishop Don Helder Camera captured that distinction well when he said, “When I feed the poor, they call me a saint.  When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist.”  <br /><br />6.The choice of which issues we attend to is greatly influenced by our relative privilege.  Poor people, victims of violence and oppression, etc, don’t get to choose which issues they need to address.  It is only the relatively privileged who have that luxury.  As our basic needs are met—food, housing, security—we can expand our horizons to think of broader and less immediate issues.  <br /><br />7. Most of us are quite privileged—easily amongst the top 10% of the world’s population.  I’m constantly reminded of that fact reading this forum.  Running in the US, is a very middle/upper middle class activity.  It is not cheap to pay for just the basics of shoes and race fees.  The idea of flying around the country, staying in hotels, and eating in restaurants simply for the luxury of running a race is literally beyond the means of most Americans—and, of course, the vast majority of the earth’s population.  (See, this is related to running!    )<br /><br />8. Having said all that, I can’t directly answer your question.  I am very active and have been all my adult life in a variety of issues.  Figuring out how to use my own privilege to promote change is an ongoing concern of mine.  But I do think that picking one issue misses the interconnected nature of many social ills.  As a practical matter, we individually can’t do it all and we need to focus on where we think we can make the best contribution at any given time.  But collectively, I don’t think it’s useful to “just pick one.”  That places the emphasis on the competition between issues rather than the commonalities they share.  Of course, just talking about one—or many—issues without the intention of doing anything about them is pointless—and part of the problem.<br /><br />9. I think many issues are connected because they all relate to the unequal distribution of power in society.  (Or as one commentator put it, the political divide in the US is not between the Left and the Right; it’s between the top and the bottom.)  Those with power can exert influence over how the rules are made and how the game is played.  They write those rules and tilt the playing field in their favor.  As a result, they accumulate greater power, exacerbating inequality (economic, political, etc).  This is a never-ending process, creating greater inequality, until those being mistreated (and/or their allies and sympathizers) get unruly and resist by mucking up the system, which is often dependent upon their contributions and cooperation.  In the face of daunting odds and opponents willing to use their power to maintain their privilege, the vast majority of change efforts fail.  But periodically, certain eruptions can be successful—and a continuing source of hope. Sometimes, as with the US War of Independence, the oppressive system is intractable and is cast off entirely.  More oftenas with the labor movement, civil rights movement, women’s movement, environmental movement, gay rights movement, etc—systems are partially reformed.  A compromise is reached that provides some measure of redress while maintaining the overall system (and many of its problems).  Either way, change is never finished; the struggle for a better world is never-ending. Hopefully, over time, the reality of democracy is slowly transformed to more closely resemble the rhetoric of democracy.  “All men are created equal” was a noble sentiment with obviously little basis in reality when it was written, since the vast majority of society—women, slaves, white men without property—were never intended to be included in that lofty rhetoric.  Two and a quarter centuries of activism have helped create a society where reality comes closer to (but still falls short of) the spirit of those words.  But there is nothing inevitable about this progress and no guarantee that it will continue; it requires vigilance and action.

    10. Fundamental social change always begins “outside the system” and gradually works its way into the mainstream. Just about all the rights, privileges, and freedoms we enjoy today (and often take for granted) were once considered silly, unthinkable, unrealistic, radical, irresponsible, and dangerous.  Democracy is a radical idea.  Activism is dangerous.  They potentially threaten the status quo and those who benefit from it.  Maybe that’s another reason why we’re so uncomfortable talking about it.

    [http://This message has been edited by Tramps (edited Mar-23-2007).|http://This message has been edited by Tramps (edited Mar-23-2007).]

  • RunstheBitterroot Legend 591 posts since
    Aug 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    28. Mar 23, 2007 10:36 AM (in response to Tamalina)
    Re: If you were an activist

    Some thoughts on activism discussion.  I thought this might be a fun thread that Tammy started and it is.  I think the political correctness issue distorts open discussion or feeling free to express our views.  The one side may feel that thier issue is a moral issue and therefore not open for discussion.  My little joke photo of "Montanans for Global Warming", was just that and I hope that I didn't offend Tammy with my joke.  What if I decided that global warming was bunk and wanted to join some group that informed the public that we are being missled?  I would be wrong and argumentative in this climate of political correctness, even if I had evidence that proved me right.  I think that might have something to do with the difficulty in sharing about things that I support. 

    Some of the things that I believe in are not politically correct, so I don't discuss those things where someone might feel offended abd because someone who is politically correct may feel a moral obligation to change the way I think or censor me. When I made a decision to post something that I believed in, I didn't decide on the things that were most important, instead I chose something important but seemed politicly nuetral. Thinking about my post later, it really isn't neutral and could seem argumentative to some.

    There really isn't a climate for discussion about things that we believe in now days, everything is political or moral. One of my friends idea of activism is not to burn plastic in the fire pit Her contribution is telliing everyone why we shouldn't do this. I really don't care one way or the other, but out of respect for my friend I don't burn plastic in the fire pit. What I enjoy is the enthusiasm for the belief. Whether I disagree or not seems unimportant if my friend reciprocates in the same way.

    Should we have a thread on activism? It's Tammy's thread and in the Boomer world it is alot safer to talk a bit more freely without getting flamed to bad. Certainly I have a choice on whether or not I want to read it. Though I disagree with the some of the posts, I do enjoy seeing a little bit about what folks are about and get to enjoy some of the more enthusiastic post.

    Larry



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    My Photo's[/URL" target="_blank"> "If you see a man running up a mountain trail in Montana with a fly pole attached to his back, you are probably lost. LDD

  • Dark Horse Legend 1,684 posts since
    Oct 9, 2005
    Currently Being Moderated
    29. Mar 23, 2007 3:51 PM (in response to Tamalina)
    Re: If you were an activist

    Tramps, you communist.

    Dark Horse

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    I'm a dark horse, running on a dark race course

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