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3420 Views 37 Replies Latest reply: May 22, 2007 9:31 PM by longdis Go to original post 1 2 3 Previous Next
  • MaineRunner2001 Rookie 265 posts since
    Mar 15, 2002
    Currently Being Moderated
    16. Dec 25, 2007 7:48 AM (in response to RRainey)
    Re: Do you finish "no matter what?

    I am still challenged by 5K to half marathon distances. Comparing my 5K times to longer distance using calculators, I have room to improve.

    Good discussion

    quote:


    Originally posted by RRainey:

    Maine, I've run one 100k on that amount of training, 8 50 milers and 18 other odd distance ultras down to 50K. As well as 24 marathons. that was running wednesday and sat/sun.

    I have a new plan increasing to tues/wed/thurs/and sat/sun

    I guess my way of thinking is "how do you know you are challenging yourself when its always possible to complete the task? Even Tiger Woods dosn't win every tournament

    [http://This message has been edited by RRainey (edited Apr-10-2007).|http://This message has been edited by RRainey (edited Apr-10-2007).]


     

     

  • ljwoodw Rookie 485 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    17. Dec 25, 2007 7:48 AM (in response to RRainey)
    Re: Do you finish "no matter what?

    quote:


    Originally posted by RRainey:


    I guess my way of thinking is "how do you know you are challenging yourself when its always possible to complete the task? Even Tiger Woods dosn't win every tournament

    [http://This message has been edited by RRainey (edited Apr-10-2007).|http://This message has been edited by RRainey (edited Apr-10-2007).]


     



    Right, but it doesn't take Tiger Woods any longer to recover from a tournament than it does from 14 holes or so. And he's not in danger of jeopardizing his future golfing by continuing.

    It's not..."I'm running badly so I quit".  It's "I'm running badly and potentially destroying the entire remaining season, so I'll prudently stop."  Besides, by giving yourself more chances to race, you're giving yourself more opportunities to challenge yourself later.

  • crunningman Rookie 918 posts since
    Jun 7, 2002
    Currently Being Moderated
    18. Apr 10, 2007 8:25 PM (in response to RRainey)
    Re: Do you finish "no matter what?

    I've pulled a DNF in two races (50K and 100M(miles that is).
    The 50K because I was racing it and ended up turning the same ankle three times over 20miles. The 100M because of dehydration issues at 50 miles.

    And you know what! I'm glad that I did. Sure I felt an immediate rush of failure, but learning from your mistakes and correcting them is more important to me.

    Why risk injury?

  • merigayle Amateur 1,569 posts since
    Aug 15, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    19. Dec 25, 2007 7:48 AM (in response to RRainey)
    Re: Do you finish "no matter what?

    quote:


    Originally posted by RRainey:



    I guess my way of thinking is "how do you know you are challenging yourself when its always possible to complete the task? Even Tiger Woods dosn't win every tournament

    [http://This message has been edited by RRainey (edited Apr-10-2007).|http://This message has been edited by RRainey (edited Apr-10-2007).]


     



    Everyone has different goals. Yours may be distance others may be improved speed and age group competition. You know you can finish a 5K, but in what time? Can you beat your best PR? It is all about what each person's goals are.

  • crunningman Rookie 918 posts since
    Jun 7, 2002
    Currently Being Moderated
    20. Apr 11, 2007 9:05 AM (in response to RRainey)
    Re: Do you finish "no matter what?

    quote:


    Originally posted by RRainey:

    I guess my way of thinking is "how do you know you are challenging yourself when its always possible to complete the task? Even Tiger Woods dosn't win every tournament


     



    Completing or finishing a race/event is totally unrelated to actually winning.  Just like Tiger can close with an 80 and still finish the tournament out of first place.

  • Sarah108 Rookie 133 posts since
    May 10, 2004
    Currently Being Moderated
    21. Apr 11, 2007 12:30 PM (in response to RRainey)
    Re: Do you finish "no matter what?

    The only race I have ever not finished was my first attempt at 100 miles last year.  I dropped shortly after 76 miles.  I have thought a lot about why I dropped.  I wasn't injured, I had a few blisters but was experiencing relatively little physical discomfort.  The main reason I can come up with was that I was bored and sick of being on the course, and couldn't stand the thought of being out there for another 7 hours which is what I had in front of me.  So I quit, and to this day I have no regrets.  I'm going to try again this year.  I learned a lot about what it means to run 100 miles, and I know a lot better now what I need to do to get through the entire race.  And I'm still a hero to most of my friends and family who can't fathom the idea of running 10 miles, let alone 76!

    I agree with the people who say it comes down to what your goals are.  My goal was to enjoy the experience of running my first 100, and I accomplished that completely.  For me, a big part of doing a race, especially an ultra, is enjoying the course and being outside, and the social element of being around friends and meeting new people.  I didn't have to finish to enjoy those elements.

  • Coastwalker Legend 384 posts since
    Aug 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    22. Apr 11, 2007 12:59 PM (in response to RRainey)
    Re: Do you finish "no matter what?

    The only race I ever DNF'd was a 5K. It was on July 4th, and was way too hot and humid for me, and even after just a mile I knew that my time was far slower than it should have been, that I was overheating quickly, that I was having a tough time breathing with it being so humid out, and that I just wasn't having any fun at all. In retrospect, I never should have started the race. I've raced in pouring rain and wind, and with snow and ice on the ground, and never considered quitting those races. But this body just can't deal with heat and humidity. That July 4th race confirmed it, and now I just stay away from hot-weather races.

    Jay

  • clanrunner Rookie 32 posts since
    Oct 15, 2002
    Currently Being Moderated
    23. Apr 11, 2007 1:38 PM (in response to RRainey)
    Re: Do you finish "no matter what?

    I've never DNF'd, and intend to never DNF for as long as I'm running. That will mean being sensible in the races I choose to do. I'll only enter if I consider myself fit enough.

    RRainey- I can relate to your way of thinking, where's the challenge if you know you will complete the task- but for me and many other runners a race is not just about finishing. It's about how fast I can do it in, and how I'm feeling as I'm doing it. Merely finishing a race doesn't complete my task. Hence a DNF to me would be a big blow to me, as even a slow time is better than a DNF. But if your goal is simply to finish, as it is for yourself and other runners, and you like to challenge yourself, then logic says than DNFs will be more common for you. A DNF for someone who aims to merely finish is the equivalent of me finishing in a time slower than my target time.

    I reckon I would walk/hobble the last 10 miles of a marathon if I had to in order to finish. I never want to DNF. Psychologically I just can't do it.

  • MaineRunner2001 Rookie 265 posts since
    Mar 15, 2002
    Currently Being Moderated
    24. Apr 11, 2007 2:00 PM (in response to RRainey)
    Re: Do you finish "no matter what?

    I have yet to DNF a race, but have stopped a couple training runs that have gone bad. It is hard for me to grasp the concept of stopping a particular run/race as quitting or dishonorable. There is nothing wrong with accepting that today is not your day, learn from what went wrong, and then race another day.

  • anneliz36 Rookie 21 posts since
    Oct 16, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    25. Apr 29, 2007 1:43 PM (in response to RRainey)
    Re: Do you finish "no matter what?

    RRainy,

    This is a really interesting thread! I've enjoyed reading the responses.

    So far, I've completed every race I've started. It would be hard for me to get a DNF, but a lot harder to live knowing I put myself in medical danger for a race that is supposed to be fun, so I would definitely drop out if it came to that. I can understand why people push themselves that hard but for me personally, it's just not worth it.

    Happy running, everyone!

  • tonya921 Rookie 376 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    26. May 1, 2007 12:24 PM (in response to RRainey)
    Re: Do you finish "no matter what?

    Well, let me just tell you what happens when I DON'T finish a race.

    I was supposed to run in the Big D Texas Marathon on April 1st,
    2007. I fully prepared for this as it was going to be my first
    marathon. Though I've been running for 10 years, this is the
    first time I was actually able to take the time to train like I needed
    to. I was trying to finish in 3 hours 30 minutes, which left me 10
    extra minutes to finish for my age qualification and get to go to Boston
    on my second marathon. I found a training program (and it works, I
    suggest others use it. it's Hal Higdon's marathon guide), changed my
    usual night-owl routine the last two nights before the race in order to
    be prepared to wake up at 5:00 the morning of the race (the race started
    at 7:30), and I stayed in a hotel 5 minutes from the starting line, which,
    if anyone knows the Dallas area, I stayed downtown right on the cross
    where I-35 meets I-30, because the race started at the Cotton Bowl
    5 minutes away. I even went and found where the starting line was
    going to be, just to be sure I knew. I made sure my husband, who had
    gone with me, and my parents, who had traveled 6 hours to watch me, and my 3 friends that were planning on being at the race knew
    where the finish line was and what time I would be there. They also
    had spectator points where they were going to try to see me during
    the actual race. I pinned my bib on my shirt the
    night before, put my chip on my shoe on the night before, laid out
    my clothes, and went to bed at 10 pm. I didn't fall asleep until
    around 11, but then I slept straight through until my alarm went off.

    I was fully prepared when I woke up. I never felt stronger or more
    awake and ready to go. I left the hotel at 6:30 in order to get to the race
    at least 45 minutes early (Remember, the starting line was only 5
    minutes away). Well, when I left the hotel, and began driving
    down I-30 to the race, there was a wreck on the highway that had
    happened earlier that morning. That was at 6:30 am, and to make a
    long story short, I was still sitting in the same spot at 8:00 am. It took
    that long for the wreck to be cleared and the traffic to continue.

    I missed the race and the clock.

    I was so devastated that I didn't sleep for 2 weeks afterwards. I even
    went to my therapist and she said that it could be compared to a
    mother who had given birth to a stillborn on her first pregnancy.
    I had all this support from friends and family, it was the first
    marathon for me, and I felt like I had let EVERYONE down.
    Finally, after two weeks of sleeping no more than 3 hours a night,
    I was exhausted. I don't know what changed, but I started sleeping
    again. I think it just took that long for me to get over the grief.

    Needless to say, I plan to run a marathon this year if I die doing it!
    I'm not going to let myself get discouraged over what happened.

    ----



    Tonya[/URL" target="_blank">
    My Log[/URL" target="_blank">

  • GreenEggsAndHam Expert 312 posts since
    Jun 4, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    28. May 1, 2007 1:56 PM (in response to RRainey)
    Re: Do you finish "no matter what?

    I've DNFed two races. Well, actually the same race two separate years.
    One I was taken off in the ambulance for dehydration (no hospital though, thankfully)

    The other I was just too discouraged, race course was closing down (marathon had 5 hour finish limit), and had blood down my legs really bad from the chafing on my thighs

    I won't drop out of a race just because it's not going well, but I'd rather run tomorrow than finish today...

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