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4845 Views 22 Replies Latest reply: Aug 29, 2007 11:10 AM by dg12002 1 2 Previous Next
catwoman73 Rookie 105 posts since
Dec 14, 2007
Currently Being Moderated

Aug 26, 2007 10:25 PM

High mileage runners- finding the time

Hi all!

I've only been running for about a year now, and have just hit 30 miles per week. I find it incredible that some people are able to find the time to run 50 or more miles per week! I would love to continue slowly increasing my weekly mileage, but I can't figure out how on earth I'm going to find the time to do it.

I don't think I'm all that different from anyone else out there- I work full time (12 hour shifts, days and nights), and my job can be quite physically and emotionally demanding. I am so exhausted after my day shifts that I go home and go straight to bed most days. I have a home to look after, and have a DH and wonderful friends that I really enjoy spending time with (none of them run). I understand the importance of rest days, but between my job and normal daily life, I very rarely have a day where I feel I can actually really "rest". DH and I are planning on starting a family within the next year, so my free time will, of course, become even more restricted.

I would really love some advice from all you busy moms and dads out there who manage to effectively balance all of your responsibilities. How do you do it?

Thanks in advance,
Pam

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  • rengle Rookie 94 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Aug 26, 2007 11:41 PM (in response to catwoman73)
    Re: High mileage runners- finding the time

    I used to do 100-150 mpw regularly and still am generally around 80-90. I found that if you ask yourself whether or not you'll have time to run on many days your answer will be that you don't. But if you decide that ARE going to run for a given amount of time on a particular day and ask when and where you'll do that that you'll find a time.

  • tbrown1 Rookie 20 posts since
    Aug 19, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. Aug 27, 2007 1:01 AM (in response to catwoman73)
    Re: High mileage runners- finding the time

    80-90 miles a week is still very whats your pb for 5k?

  • mopak Rookie 57 posts since
    Jan 28, 2005
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Aug 27, 2007 7:16 AM (in response to catwoman73)
    Re: High mileage runners- finding the time

    Hi Catwoman, I work in medical transport and have extremely unpredictable work hours. Not unusual to do a 16-18hr day off less than an hours notice of my start time. Finish times are when the job is completed. I live 50kms from work in a rural setting with no access to public transport.
    These days my running is usually only in the 60-90kms (not Miles) range but I also put in anywhere from 70 -200kms per week of mountain biking. I also do weights and quite a bit of hiking. In summer I add some swimming and if our empty lakes and rivers fill after our 8 year drought I will be doing some kyaking.
    How, well as Rengle says you must decide you WILL do it then work out how/where and when.
    I'm lucky, first I'm a bloke and also live in a small community so running/riding in the dark is no issue for me apart from the odd confrontation with marsupials.
    One way I get running/riding done is to combine it with my commute. This isn't always practical because of the standby nature of my work but if I know my start time then I try to work it in.
    I always have my bike in the back of the ute and my running gear in my work bag.
    I try to get a run or ride in before I get home after work. Easy to get home and think of a million reasons not to do it. Getting out of the car on the way home is easier.
    I don't get a meal break as such but sometimes I have a period of wait time . This is often in some far away locale.
    If the opportunity is there I will squeeze in a run, even if only 15-20 mins. Great opportunity to do a quick tour of some place I'm not familiar with.
    When the family is going visiting I will often leave early on the bike and ride part of the journey. On the way home I often get dropped off and run the last 10-20kms.
    Sometimes I get home late from work and everybody is asleep so I go out and run.
    After an early start such as 2 or 3 am I am tired and head to bed early. I always wake after 5-6 hrs so if I went to bed at 10 I wake at 3 or 4. In summer this is a great time to run or ride.

    Of course these are MY ways of making the time, you will have to invent your own. But if you want to do it it can be done.

  • lolly75 Rookie 83 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. Aug 27, 2007 7:38 AM (in response to catwoman73)
    Re: High mileage runners- finding the time

    I used to only run if I could get it in during lunch.  Now that I have switched to training for long runs (HM and M) I have way too many miles to log to get in during lunch.

    Tough, yes... I work a full time job, kids, husband who works even more hours than I do, so I have to run the house too!

    Well... one day I said that my training was a priority and I made it so. My husband is supportive. That is key. For example this morning he got dressed out of laundry baskets, becuase I had to get in an 11 mile run yesterday and I didn't want to run near the house - it gets boring. then I had a baby shower to get to. OH and he doesn't fold laundry (I won't let him)...

    Somethings gotta give, and since I feel so much better running, what gave for me is perfection.  If the floors don't get washed and it means I ran - well so be it.  Laundry's not folded - so be it.  You won't find the cleaver's house here.

  • cfkid727 Rookie 42 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. Aug 27, 2007 8:32 AM (in response to catwoman73)
    Re: High mileage runners- finding the time

    quote:


    Originally posted by catwoman73:

    Hi all!

    I've only been running for about a year now, and have just hit 30 miles per week. I find it incredible that some people are able to find the time to run 50 or more miles per week! I would love to continue slowly increasing my weekly mileage, but I can't figure out how on earth I'm going to find the time to do it.


     



    I'm in the same situation as you are. I'm going to hit 35 miles this week, and hope to get to 50-55 by May for my first Full. I think that I will get faster (I already have to a degree) and that will allow me to get in more miles.

    I currently run at about 5:45 most mornings. That's early, but it's before the wife and kids are awake, so I don't cut into their time. And, I've been getting up at 4:45 for 15 years or so, for meds, etc. So, nothing has really changed, other than I may be 5 - 10 minutes late to work. I think if I push, I can get out the door at 5:30 and eliminate that also.




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    CfKid[/URL" target="_blank">

  • runawayjesse Rookie 538 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    8. Aug 27, 2007 3:39 PM (in response to catwoman73)
    Re: High mileage runners- finding the time

    The important thing to keep in mind is time not miles. You have to consider Elite's, that is full time runners run btw- 10-13 hours per week. True this does yeild 100+ miles per week but the time spent training is more imporant. If a full time runner can handle 12 hours of running why would a regualr Joe that has a full time job and a family expect more? Furthermore studies have been done that show more than 10 hours of time spent running increases your chance to injury significantly. Another way to look at it is this. Most runners average 180 footsteps per minute regardless of pace. Thats about 10,000 steps per hour of nearly 3x your body weight on impact. So a 6 min miler and a 10 min miler go for an hour run they will both endure the same amount of impact stress. The faster runner will go 10 miles while the slower runner will go 6 miles. Provided the energy level is the same the training effect is similar. So when trying to mimick the elite(as some of us do)consider taking into account the time spent training not miles. After all optimal training is how they got their right?

    This is why I like Arthur Lydiards suggestions in his book "running to the top". Although he clearly states in his eariler books that -time is the important factor, his latest book has the actuall guidline. 10 hours of running this year may yeild 50 miles. As you get more conditioned you do more miles in the same time frame(you get faster). I'm not suggesting stopping at 10(as he didn't either)but it's a reasonable goal to aim for for a family/working person.

    I think even most single moms can work in 10 hours of running per week(if not than 8 is still good). Most people can find that time by simply droping their time in front of the tube. Consider my situation- I work 70 hours per week, trade the kids off in the parking lot(a 7 yr old and a 6 month old)as my wife works the opposite 70 hours as me(how conveient). Evenings are spent doing house work taking care of kids etc... I simply go to bed when the kids do, wake up at 3:00 AM and run for 1-1.5 hours(weekdays, as my wife comes home), than get to work by 6:00 AM. True you will not find me in front of the tube or at happy hour with the guys but thats my choice. Like rengle said just put that certain time per day aside and you will learn to build it into your schedule. I personally know single moms logging 60 MPW on the treadmill as their kids sleep.

    I have met a few people logging 80+ MPW at paces 8 min mile and slower. The ones I have met either were in school(college)with little responsibilty or adults that live lives that revolve around running. Not exactly the balance your looking for.

    Good luck

  • Gregolowe Rookie 324 posts since
    Jul 6, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    9. Aug 27, 2007 3:49 PM (in response to catwoman73)
    Re: High mileage runners- finding the time

    10 hours a week. I like that. I just added up my time for this week, which is a peak week prior to my VT50 attempt in 5 weeks. Time? 10 hours. M-1,T-2,W-1,Th-2,Fri-rest, Sat-4, Sun-rest. Total? 10 hours. Sweet. I can manage this and as I get faster, then my miles will increase. As is, right now this works out to about 40-45 miles per week.

  • aharmer Rookie 452 posts since
    May 25, 2005
    Currently Being Moderated
    10. Aug 27, 2007 5:02 PM (in response to catwoman73)
    Re: High mileage runners- finding the time

    I also break it down by time.  My week usually consists of 3 one hour runs, 1 two hour run, and 1 three hour run.  My schedule is very busy and unpredictable as well so I take the runs as they're given to me.  If I'm scheduled for a one hour run and at the last minute time becomes available, it becomes a three hour run.  Allowing this flexibility will help you fit more into the week.

    I also finally realized that to do the training I wanted it had to be my primary hobby. I quit TV, golf, hired out the yardwork, etc. Not for everybody but most people have time if they really break it down. Starting a two hour run at 9:00pm when you're shot from the day sucks but if it's important to you it gets done. For many people it's not that important, which isn't a poor reflection on them, they just have different priorities. Best of luck, hope it all works out!

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    My Profile[/URL" target="_blank">

    "Pain is temporary. Regret hurts forever."
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  • runawayjesse Rookie 538 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    12. Aug 27, 2007 5:46 PM (in response to catwoman73)
    Re: High mileage runners- finding the time

    Hired out the yard work? Ha,ha,ha I've been looking for a way to "hire out the kids".

    Gregolowe, keep in mind it's how you spend those 10 hours that counts. When running that 10 hours becomes easy you need to apply an addtiional stimulas. Taking one day and pushing the effort is the first step than adding hills etc..Or just pick a few races to train for. The 10 easy hours comes first though! You will improve only so much on that alone. The point is you don't necessarly need MORE just because your mileage doesn't equal some generic sum. If your running 10 hours per week and it equals 45 miles consider adding intensity in those miles for awhile. In time focus on bringing down your average pace per mile for awhile than go back up to the 10 hours. Wala, you have a mileage increase. Training in cycles like this has lead to steady improvments for me and I never had and probably never will have time to run more than 10 hours per week.

  • rengle Rookie 94 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    13. Aug 27, 2007 11:26 PM (in response to catwoman73)
    Re: High mileage runners- finding the time

    quote:


    Originally posted by tbrown1:

    80-90 miles a week is still very whats your pb for 5k?


     



    Well, it's 15:33 from a long time ago. I don't race all that often anymore but did manage 18:18 in the spring.

  • tss1201 Rookie 79 posts since
    Aug 26, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    14. Aug 28, 2007 8:09 AM (in response to catwoman73)
    Re: High mileage runners- finding the time

    I work at least 50 hours per week, from 9am to pretty late in the evening.  I never know when I'll have to stay late (we're talking 9pm or later).  Therefore, I get up and run in the mornings.  Two days a week, I am out the door by 5:30 or 6am, and I get back by 7:30am.  This gives me a chance to do a 10-12 mile run followed by an hour to get ready for work.  Other days, I leave by 6:30am and do either a shorter run or go to the gym to lift weights.  I currently run about 45-50mpw.  My log says I spent 7 hours and 50 minutes running last week (total of 52 miles). 

    But then again, I don't have children.  I really don't have much of a life during the week 

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