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15315 Views 247 Replies Latest reply: Apr 19, 2007 2:52 PM by dhuey040 Go to original post 1 ... 13 14 15 16 17 Previous Next
  • 2xssct Rookie 28 posts since
    Sep 27, 2005

    quote:


    Originally posted by paulmitch:

    I'm thinking of buying new sneakers right now before Boston? Has anyone ever ran a marathon before a marathon this close. Debating because I have a hint of shin splints, and mine are over 550 miles already. What do you guys and girls think?


     



    If they are the same model you have now, and you've never had a problem breaking them in, then you're really not trying anything new. So I would go for it.

    If you want to get a different model, then I'd recommend getting the same model. And if you can't/won't do that, you still have some miles to break and try out the new shoes (which might work, if you're one of those people who isn't fussy over footwear.)

    Also, your shin splints might go away on their own, as you'll be in heavy taper.

    Finally, not to condescend, but take this as a lesson and don't be caught with an old pair of shoes, ever.  Especially before an important race! 

  • runninlaw Amateur 983 posts since
    Mar 13, 2006

    paulmitch:  If you can find the same model, definitely trade them up!  I have had a hard time finding kayano XIIs, but did find them on e-bay.  Personally, I would much rather run a race on new shoes than one with 550 miles on it!  But then again, I have NEVER gotten 550 miles out of a pair of shoes.

    Get them ASAP and wear them all week so you can break them in a little. I personally can wear kayanos off the shelf for a 20 miler, but better safe than sorry.

    And do try to find the XIIs if that is what you are running in. The 13s fit way differently for me (longer and less width in the toebox - but that is for womens...).

    Good luck!!!!

  • cohenmd Rookie 24 posts since
    Jun 3, 2005

    lurker here - but one who is running Boston - albeit for charity.  will be my second Boston and third overall....

    Paulmitch - here is a link for finishline.com. I know they still have 12s.

    <a href="http://www.finishline.com/store/catalog/search.jsp?Ntt=gelkayano" target="_blank">http://www.finishline.com/store/catalog/search.jsp?Ntt=gelkayano[/URL" target="_blank">

    ....u can also google finish line.com coupon codes for $15 or 20% off. others vendors like kelly running warehouse and holabird sports should have them as well. If you order now, you may get them before you leave for Boston.

    In my experience, running shoes do not need to be broken in.  I would use new shoes rather than ones with 550 miles.

  • jparry Rookie 110 posts since
    Oct 27, 2005

    For anyone interested in running with an unofficial 3:20 pace group at Boston, there's a list of our names and race numbers under an "Unofficial 3:20 Boston pace group" post in this forum. We plan to meet briefly around 8:15 am at the Med tent next to the Middle School in the athletes' village so we can recognize each other during the race. So far we are all in different start corrals, so we aim to come through the half in about 1:37 / 1:38 and spot each other by about then.

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  • jparry Rookie 110 posts since
    Oct 27, 2005

    For anyone interested in running with an unofficial 3:20 pace group at Boston, there's a list of our names and race numbers under an "Unofficial 3:20 Boston pace group" post in this forum. We plan to meet briefly around 8:15 am at the Med tent next to the Middle School in the athletes' village so we can recognize each other during the race. So far we are all in different start corrals, so we aim to come through the half in about 1:37 / 1:38 and spot each other by about then.

    ----


     

  • paulmitch Amateur 307 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007

    Hey thanks guys runninglaw, cohenmd, and anyone else who helped. I got the asics 13 this morning, (had no more 12's) and it will be a game time decision on whether I'll where these or my old 12's. I wish I could wear these to bed to break them in. They feel really good though. Well good luck in your training this week.

  • runninlaw Amateur 983 posts since
    Mar 13, 2006

    We talked about this before, but I saw Tim posted this in Boomers.  It is long, but a great and informative read, especially for some us us first timers.  Enjoy:

    Below is the Boston Marathon Tips as posted from last years Boomers and Beyond Boston Marathon Tips Thread started by Spareribs.
    I edited the tips and they are on my website for you doenloading pleasure or you can email me and request a copy.

    If you have additional tips, post them here and I will add them.

    ENJOY

    Tim,
    Ardmore, OK...........

    Boston Marathon, Tips to get you to the Finish Line
    Courtesy of Coolrunning Boomers and Beyond, April 2006.

    Tip #1
    Tapering and the day before the race. You are almost there.
    1. Tapering applies to all marathons of course but especially Boston because of the hills. It's natural to get nervous during the taper. And many people who get nervous eat more. Whatever you do, please cut back on your eating because you are running fewer miles, and you don't want to risk putting on a couple of pounds during the taper and making the hills worse than they are. Ideally, you will hold your good training weight. Do not diet! But simply adjust your intake to match your lessened workload.
    2. It’s better to take an “off” day from running 2 days before the event (Saturday) rather then Sunday. An easy 2 to 3 miles on Sunday will help avoid feeling flat on race day. In fact, even Dr. Jack Daniels agrees with this and has a scheduled off day on Saturday.
    3. Rest, rest and more rest.
    You may be bringing your family, or a boyfriend/girlfriend, and they will certainly want to do something fun on Sunday, like walk the Freedom Trail. By all means, let them go do this and wish them a good time, but don't go yourself!
    On Sunday, other than the Freedom Run, a fairly short fun run, or your own ritual 2-3 miler, try to stay off your feet as much as possible. Go to the Expo, pick up your number, shop a bit, and then get off your feet! You should be well-rested for the race.
    "Rest - to Kenyans this is complete rest, doing nothing other than reading or watching TV, it is bed rest, not driving or anything else. Being a runner is a business and you cannot do two businesses at once. Rest is part of the complete lifestyle needed to be a runner."
    Tip #2
    Its EXPO time.
    1. Pick up the Boston Marathon poster at the Adidas exhibit. This poster has the names of every entrant, and yes you can find your own name. The poster is free. Don't forget it.
    2. Give yourself plenty of time at the Expo. It’s probably the biggest and best runners’ expo in America. Marathon merchandise is excellent, but very pricey. Just get the one or two items you really want (the jacket is cool). In addition to the poster, there are lots of freebies (you will be sick of power bars by the time the marathon is over).
    Tip #3
    The last warm up miles; The Freedom Run.
    The Freedom run starts where the Marathon finishes on Boylston Street. (Boylston is a one way street going toward the Boston Garden).
    Newbury Street (boutiques, the Ritz, Emmanuel Churchgreat place for a service and incredible music) is the next street over (but one way going toward Mass. Ave.). The Boston Garden is at one end of Boylston, and Mass Ave., a large thoroughfare, is at the other end.<br />In between, the cross streets are arranged in alphabetical order. <br />Starting from the Gardens, they are:<br />Arlington <br />Berkeley<br />Clarendon<br />Dartmouth<br />Exeter<br />Fairfield<br />Gloucester<br />Hereford<br />Mass. Ave.<br />Tip #4 <br />Twas' night before Boston.<br />1. If you are going to the Pasta Party, get there early. Don’t be discouraged by the quarter mile line – it moves rapidly. The pasta is actually fresh, hot and tasty. Be sure to thank the servers. Get your dessert early, as that tends to run out quickly. Find a seat away from the loudspeakers.<br />2. If you are making your own dinner arrangements, then make your reservations early so you may be able to go to your preferred dinner establishment.<br />Tip #5 <br />It's time to leave from the shuttles.<br />1. The Common is fairly well organized, but you need to arrive early in order to get on the bus for the ride to the Athlete's village. There are lines everywhere for the busses, but they move quickly. Get there on time.<br />2. Thank your bus driver. <br />3. Share stories with the person you sit next to (odds are they are a first timer – there were 14,000 first time Boston marathon runners in 2005).<br />3. Alternative to riding the Shuttle buses.<br />A. If hanging around the village for hours and hours is not your thing and you'd rather warm up at home or in your comfy hotel room with your own bathroom, get dropped off at the South Street industrial park in Milford. Shuttle busses run from there to the starting line every 5 minutes.<br />But beware. If coming down via Route 495, the exit can get backed up by 10:30. Take the back roads from Milford - clear sailing. <br />Don't hesitate to thank anyone who is working in Hopkinton on Monday morning. We tend to beat the crap out of that little town every Patriot's Day and it probably wouldn't hurt to say thanks if you get a chance. <br />B. Local Running clubs charter their own buses and usually have room for “outsiders”. They charge a small fee, but no more than the club members.<br />C. Or, you can just resist the temptation to lodge in noisy, crowded, expensive, Boston and get a cheap hotel room in Milford, three miles from Hopkington, then take the short bus ride to the start and arrive at a comfortable 10:45 AM at which time you'll locate your bag drop bus, which can be a long walk depending on your race number, (10,000 - 12,000 tend to be the farthest walk) then have just enough time to take a nice walk around the park checking out the sights, stretch and get into your corral without having to wait all morning.<br />Tip #6 <br />What are you packing?<br />REMEMBER: If you’re keeping it, then it has to fit in the bag you received with your packet. The bag is 17” x 24” with a drawstring top that also makes into a sort-of backpack. <br />1. The bag is not secure, if you are storing valuables, you may never see them again. Suggestion, bring a small backpack and then put the official gear check bag around it - a little more secure since it has zippers and compartments.<br />2. You need a bed at the village.<br />When you do you’re packing for Boston go out to the garage and get two great big plastic leaf bags, and bring them with you.<br />Then on Sunday at your hotel, pick up a couple of Boston Globes or other big thick newspapers. Bring the bags and the newspapers with you on the bus to Hopkinton.<br />When you get to the athletes village, find a spot where you can lie down, then begin rumpling into balls each sheet of each newspaper and fill the two leaf bags, until you have used up both newspapers. Tie the bags at the top and lay them on the ground end to end, and you will have the most comfortable, dry bed for relaxing that you ever saw. Many people also bring cheap, throwaway air mattresses. But whatever you do, bring something! You will be out there for many hours. It is an impossibly long wait, in a crowded place, and the ground is often damp and cold. Whatever you do, think through what you will do to recline on the ground for all that time. You don't want to be on your feet. If you are not the nervous type, you could even bring a book to read. Remember, it's a noon start, and you will be out there about 8 a.m. Many will tell you it's the worst part of the race.<br />2. Bring sunscreen. <br />Put it on even if it's cloudy. Don't put it on your forehead directly above your eyes - it can sting if sweat washes it down into your eyes. <br />There is a new sunscreen out, called Neutrogena Ultrasheer. It contains an ingredient called "Helioplex", which is basically a stabilized version of Parsol 1789, a great broad-spectrum sunscreen. The beauty of Helioplex is that it is photo-stabilized so that it remains effective for 5 hours, which allows most of us enough time to cross the finish line on Boylston Street.<br />3. Bring a poncho or a garbage bag cut out, it just could rain.<br />4. Bring a permanent, black magic marker. Have a new friend print your name on both of your biceps in large letters. You will be amazed how many people will personally cheer you on if they see your name. Or, try using an old bib, reverse it (number facing in) and mark it any way you want; pin it below you official bib<br />5. OK, guys only, sorry Gal’s, but it is just the way things are. Since there is a lot of waiting; carry an empty Gatorade bottle to the starting line and wear a black cut out trash bag (both for warmth and wind protection) and you'll have your own porta-potty. Some people have been doing this for years and its tons better than standing in line at the porta potty. For the pee bottle - the wide mouth 16oz Gatorade plastic bottle works pretty well. The standard bottled water container has too narrow an opening, even for those of us with the Irish Curse, and you really don't want to be peeing on your hand. Empty it first, and then fill'er back up; you're doing yourself and everyone else a favor by not clogging up a porta-potty line.<br />6. The following was copied this from McMillan's website where he has a bunch of tips about preparing for Boston:<br />Here are some of the essential items you’ll want to pack:<br />A. A disposable drop-cloth. Buy a plastic one at Wal-Mart or Home Depot for $2.00-$3.00.<br />B. A small, collapsible umbrella to keep the rain, wind and/or sun at bay. <br />C. A baseball-style cap to keep heat in if it’s freezing and heat off if it’s roasting. For reasons of self-preservation, don’t wear a Yankees cap. You might be related to Yogi Berra or Mickey Mantle or whoever; but, I’m telling you, people around Boston don’t have a sense of humor about that sort of thing. Besides, one of the Battle of Lexington and Concord re-enactors might be lurking around—he’ll be packing a musket. Yeah, it might take him five minutes to load the mini ball; but, who wants to take a chance? <br />D. A handful of garbage bags for your feet in case it is wet or muddy. You could also barf into one if you get nervous and want some demonstrative form of tension release. <br />E. Sunscreen. You want you should look like a lizard when you’re 30? <br />F. Lip balm. Since you will lick your lips more than once in anticipation of a marathon PR, you’ll want to avoid Sandpaper Lip Syndrome. And who knows? Someone may want to give you a big, fat smooch after that PR. <br />G. Bottled water. Bring 25% more than you think you’ll need, just in case. Heck, you could always sell it for $20 a bottle to the poor, ill-prepared schmuck not reading this article. <br />H. Pre-race food. Pack all the Pop-Tarts, bagels, bananas, juice, etc. in your bag. Use one of your garbage bags to pack your waste in and deposit it in a garbage can as you head to the start (not everyone is this courteous, and you’ll want to represent well, right?). <br />I. A novel, some magazines, the Boston Globe Sunday edition, etc. Though you might strike up a conversation with someone from Peoria, chances are, they’ll want to obsess about the race. Since you don’t want to do that, pick something that will divert your mind, if only for a while. <br />J. Ear plugs. You might want to catch a cat-nap; and, as noted before, there will be 30-40,000 folks all around you. They will not be whispering or humming softly to themselves. <br />K. A range of protective outerwear. During your trip to the Discount Superstore to stock-up on pre-race noshes, buy a cheap sweatshirt, cheap sweat pants, cheap gloves and cheap rain suit or poncho. Trust me; this will be the best $25-30 you ever spent. Plan to toss all of this prior to the race: race volunteers collect all the discarded clothing for distribution at homeless shelters and the like. You’ll feel good in more ways than one before the race start. <br />L. A roll of toilet paper. You might need to blow your nose. Or dab away a tear thinking about what it means to be running the Boston Marathon. But, really, what if you wait for 45:00 to get inside a portable toilet and it is out of tissue? You could buy an extra pair of cheap gloves, but, I really don’t want to go there. <br />Tip #7 <br />Athletes Village. Well, you gotta wait somewhere.<br />1. At the park – find a comfy spot with a good view (if you know what I mean). Remember you can only store items on the busses that fit within the goodie bag received at registration. It’s possible that you get a “by the rules” bag checker – so you may not want to bring a camping mattress (even if it fits in the bag, it might be the only thing that you can store). Thank the bag checker anyway. <br />2. It is quite chilly in the morning, about 48 degrees at 6:30am, and you can be deceived into thinking it will be a cool day. Cover up in the morning. Remember Boston can be very warm at race time, 75 degrees or better.<br />3. During the long wait, it is good to relax a bit. Close your eyes. Visualize the race. Have a drink and a snack. (Bring these with you!!). Try to be calm so as to reduce the tension which will waste precious energy. Talk to other runners; they have many interesting stories.<br />4. Soak up the atmosphere. Stop and look around and try to remember the many sights. It's a once in a lifetime event. Congratulations. You've earned a spot in Boston!!<br />Tip #8 <br />Fueling and Hydration. You are what you eat.<br />1. Remember when you ran the qualifying race, you got up at 5AM had a quick banana and sped out the door for a 7 or 8AM start. Well now your start is at lunch; this next week during your taper you may want to adjust your eating habits to give your body time to adjust to a later breakfast/different breakfast. For some runners, their early morning long run routine may include breaks. A sudden switch on Patriot's Day can wreak havoc to a long training program. It is real important now to think about when and what to eat. A banana at 8AM won't cut it for Boston, please plan accordingly.<br />2. Pre race food - Another Boston curve. Noon is really late. You need some real food after the pasta dinner. Have t a real breakfast 4 or 5 hours before noon. Skip the fruits and veggies, wrong time to think about colon health. <br /><br />3. Race time – Continue with the same training regime. On the course at one (maybe two?) places will be Powergel. You may want a power bar or something in your key pocket. <br />4. Being smart about fueling and hydration applies to any marathon, but Boston does throw a few more curves at you. <br />Pre-hydration – Hydrating ahead of time cannot be accomplished Monday morning. Increase liquids for a couple of days. Nibbling salty stuff may help. If you have a beer the night before, fine, don’t have 4. Everyone is walking around pre-race drinking and peeing, drinking and peeing. If your body is charged you really cannot stockpile fluids. Stop drinking 1 hr before. 30 min before the lines at the porta-potties are very manageable. If you have cup of coffee Monday morning, fine, don’t have 4. And don’t have it in the last hour. <br />Once you start running your body will go into running mode pretty quickly. Try taking a disposable squirt top water bottle (or Gatorade) to the start. Don’t drink it before you start running! Five minutes after you start running, begin drinking, a squirt here, and a squirt there. Yeah, you have to carry it but you’re running downhill, and going “amazingly” slow because you’re on pace. As you run past those first few water stops, you will appreciate having this, as well as not having to pay the maitre d’ to get to a table. Then chuck it. <br />Hydration rate – Consuming 24 to 32 oz of liquids per hour is a good number. It sounds like a lot but if you’re running 8:30’s it’s only one 4oz cup per mile. Everyone should know their dehydration rate. It varies widely by individual and is affected by hot weather. (And we know the weather can be anywhere from mid 20’s early to 90 by midday (ok not on the same day). Averages are actually nearly ideal running around 40 to around 55.) So back to the question at hand, simply weigh yourself before and after any longish run and figure the pounds lost per hour. A quart is about 2 pounds. Even if you are drinking enough expect to finish more than 2 lbs lighter than where you start.<br />Don’t worry too much about hypothermia. You have to overdo it to kill yourself with to much water. By using (some) Gatorade you greatly reduce the likelihood of diluting your bodies chemistry to the danger point. <br />Electrolytes – These are chemicals in your body like sodium and potassium that keep things working. Great news here. The BAA will be providing Gatorade Endurance formula throughout the course. Look for it in 24 oz bottles and try it now. It has 5 things in it, sodium, potassium, sugar, and some other stuff. <br />4. Consume carbs and more carbs to sustain your energy through the tough miles.<br />Tip #9 <br />Get your own Cheering section; you like to hear your name, don’t you?<br />1. At no other marathon in the U.S. will you encounter a crowd as knowledgeable or "into" it as the Boston crowd. Sorry NY'ers, but the Boston crowd is tops. They will call your name, or call out whatever is written on your shirt. You will hear it a minimum of 200 times throughout the race. So if you want them to help you, help them. Put something on your shirt that identifies you, and they will pick up on it like you won't believe. <br />In 1977, a guy ran the whole way with "Arthritis: the nation's number one crippling disease." labeled on his shirt. Everybody yelled "Hey, arthritis" and "Go arthritis." I imagine he got pretty tired of being called Arthritis by the end of that race.<br />In 2004, I had someone write "Yankees Suck" in big magic marker on my chest, and that's all I heard from the partisan crowd. They went wild! If you want the crowd involved, dis the Yankees or praise the Red Sox.<br />If you want the crowds help, give some serious thought to putting your name on your shirt. The crowd is so good at this that they will pick up on almost any country's flag, your alma mater, any clue you want to give them. My only advice would be to pass on any shirt like "Arthritis", as that can be a downer after a few miles.<br />Tip #10 <br />The tough miles and the endless hills; you trained for it, right?<br />1. Mile 8-15, relax and stay comfortable. <br />2. Mile 15-17.5, remain focused on the run. This area tends to be the first real mental test, with the steep downhill, crowded uphill over the Highway and everybody looking for the turn onto Comm Ave. <br />3. Mile 17.5 - 20.5, what more can we say? The hills aren't going away any time soon. Remember, there is a lot more flat and moderate downhill than uphill through this section. It’s just that this is where we get low on energy and start with the self-doubt. Keep moving! <br />4. Mile 20.5 - 22, enjoy the cheers. Use them to pick up steam after the hills. <br />5. Mile 22-26.2, sorry, you’re on your own here. Note: this is where the racing part comes in if you haven't been overdoing it on the first half. For some reason, this is even more true in Boston. Most likely it is a combination of the course, time of year and general expectations, but if you feel like flying when you turn onto Beacon St., Go for it!<br />6. The Hills; need I say more?<br />A. Heartbreak hill is actually a series of hills that the experienced call "the hills". The grade starts around mile 17 but the official start of the hills is the right hand turn onto Commonwealth Avenue (Comm. Ave.) at 17.5. First a short hill, then a break, then a double bump. The longer hills come after that. They end at 20.5 miles. A huge benefit is knowing where the hills end. When you are wondering exactly where the hills end (if ever), look ahead, on the left side there is a big tan Tudor Style house with dark brown accents and marks the top and end of the hill. Now get ready to enjoy some downhill (in fact a little too steep down for my taste). <br />As best as can made out on the topo map, the 72 ft line crosses Comm. Ave., right at the house, then you will follow a contour line until after BC (150 yards), then start crossing contours in the down direction before Cleveland Circle.<br />B. If you ask someone to describe the course to you, you will often hear: "net downhill course overall, slight downhill to 16, four miles uphill, then downhill again to the finish." The issue is that people over-emphasize the hills, so just one comment for those obsessing: you will not believe until you run them how many rest opportunities exist within the hills. There are either long flat areas, or short downhill’s to give you some respite from the few short pulls uphill that you will encounter. Anyone who is a competent marathoner to have qualified for Boston should not regard the four-mile hill portion as a killer part of the marathon and I would like to encourage you to think of the hills as just a different part of the course makeup, but most assuredly NOT as big a deal as they are often made out to be. Certainly they will take something out of you for the final four miles, as has been stated here, but while you are there, you will see that your work is fairly well broken up with some easy sections. I don't know if this is a "tip" or not, but many say, after a couple of Boston’s, "you know, this is just not a big deal; I think I let others convince me that it was."<br />C. The hills themselves are not that tough - they are honest hills, but by themselves not that big a deal. Even where they come up in the marathon isn't a big deal.<br />D. When first-timers have issues with the hills, it's because it's BOSTON and the combination of things that go with it: <br />1. The faster than normal field, because of qualifiers, plus the fact that many good runners target their training specifically around this race make the hills especially tough.<br />2. It is downhill during the first several miles.<br />3. The crowd is very supportive (particularly the Wellesley ladies - c'mon now, who hasn't sped up during that stretch?!)<br />E. Runners who wear Yankees stuff HAVE to run too fast for their own protection!<br />Net - the hills aren't bad if you run a smart race; the problem is that because of the above factors and more, it's tough to be disciplined and run a smart race in Boston (witness the carnage of 2004 when people should have slowed down given the temps and ended up spewing the last several miles)E. RUN SMART. Don’t go out too fast, control your pace otherwise the hills will claim a victory. But, it is so easy to not run a smart race at Boston, even if you think you are being extremely careful and plan every detail.<br />F. More details on the Newton Hills.<br />The first hill starts at mile 16: it's the I-95 overpass. The frustrating things about this hill are that (1) you don't really feel like you're in Newton yet, since you haven't yet turned onto Comm. Ave., yet you're being hit with a hill, and (2) it seems to keep going and going, even after you've cleared the highway. In fact it gets steeper towards the top.<br />After this you cruise down Washington St. for a mile, and then when you turn right on Comm. Ave. at the fire station, BAM, the second hill hits you, at about mile 17.6. The main part of the hill is fairly short, but there are a few "aftershocks". Then it's fairly comfortable down to Walnut St., just past mile 19. Incidentally, this intersection is where you will find the Johnny Kelley statue ("Young at Heart"). It is marked incorrectly on the BAA map, around mile 20. If you've looked and couldn't find it, that's why.<br />At Walnut the third hill begins. It tapers off after maybe a third of a mile, and then it's flat through Centre St. (mile 20).<br />Then, finally, Heartbreak Hill begins, about a third of the way into mile 21. As pointed out, there are actually two peaks to Heartbreak Hill; the Tudor house previously described is on the second peak (at Manet Rd., about mile 21). But I, at least, feel I've cleared Heartbreak when I reach the first peak, at Hammond St. And I think here is where the crowd will tell you that you have topped the hill. It's also where one of the more well-equipped med tents is (as I discovered the hard way last year).<br />G. Here are a couple of excerpts from the Runningtimes website on uphill and downhill running techniques.<br />Downhill Running<br />The key to optimal downhill running technique is to allow gravity to help you flow down the hill. This requires adjusting your body position forward so your body remains as close as possible to perpendicular to the hill, and increasing your leg turnover as you gain speed. Avoid the typical errors of leaning back or over-striding, which increase the braking component of downhill running, thereby increasing the jarring forces and slowing you down. To improve your balance and stay in control, keep your shoulders relaxed but allow your elbows to move out moderately from your sides.<br />Uphill Running<br />Correct uphill running technique is relatively simple. The most common error is leaning forward, which is counterproductive to maintaining speed. Looking ahead and not down will help you retain a more upright posture. Let your stride shorten and your knees lift naturally. You will tend to use your arms more as you lift your knees, but try to keep your shoulders and arms relaxed.<br />Tip #11 <br />Post Race, you're done, but it ain’t over yet.<br />1. Get in the massage line quickly if you want one – the tables fill rapidly. It is very difficult to move in the crowds at the end of the race, especially if you have several people trying to stay together. Prearrange your meeting place with your significant other(s). The easiest meeting place is back at your hotel room. If you want to meet in the designated areas, change your last name to Zippy (there was hardly anyone standing under the “W,X,Y,Z” sign compared to the first letters in the alphabet). <br />2. Finisher medal etiquette: You may (in fact, you are encouraged) to wear your finisher medal everywhere you go in the afternoon and evening on Monday. Wear it proudly, and you might even get a freebie for it. However, it is a BIG TIME rookie mistake to wear your finisher medal on Tuesday. Now you know. Good luck. <br />Tip #12 <br />OK, what now?<br />This applies to any marathon but especially to Boston, which is a huge goal race for many people. This tip is about what to do afterward. You have your medal, your logo apparel, your finishing time to turn over in your mind, experiences you will remember and talk about for years. Oh, and very sore legs. How do you move forward from here? <br />Let-downs are common after you have reached a major goal that you have been working toward for many months. In addition to the psychological aspects of this problem, there's the fact that marathons leave you very physically drained, and it can take a long time for your energy to return to its pre race level. It can be a difficult period, but you can avoid the worst of it by following some of these tips:<br />• Eat as soon as you can. Your body is extra-efficient at absorbing carbohydrates in the first hour or so after long exercise. If you can get some healthy calories into you as soon as you finish, you'll have a good head start on your recovery.<br />• Have a recovery plan. You followed a schedule diligently for months beforehand; apply the same thought to your recovery. Many people take a planned few weeks off after a marathon. This is a great time to do some light cross-training. Others don't like to stop running, but follow a "reverse taper" for 5 weeks or so. Use your experience to develop a plan that suits you. Chances are you are having some nagging aches and pains; now is the time to listen to them and recover thoroughly. Marathon recoveries can take a long time, so be patient.<br />• Set a new goal. Once you're recovered, all that training you did to get to Boston will still be there and working for you. Think about knocking off some fast 5 or 10k's this summer. Not satisfied with your time and want to do better at a fall marathon? Pick your race and start planning for it. <br /><br />Running is a cyclical process... this is the end of one big cycle but also the start of a new one. Take pride in your accomplishment, and then start looking ahead to your next challenge.<br />Tip #13 <br />BOSTON MARATHON TIPS, OR “TEN THINGS THE BAA WON’T TELL YOU”<br />Presented by the Colonial Road Runners Newsletter<br />The Boston Marathon information booklet, sent out to all runners, has much useful information, but here are some additional tips you won’t find in the booklet:<br />1. Avoid pre-race hoopla. All the pre-race activities can be physically and mentally taxing. To avoid crowded aisles and delays at the Expo, get there just after it opens at 9 AM on Saturday or Sunday. Skip the Sunday pasta dinner entirely (unless you are staying downtown and have no place else to eat), or at least beat the lines by arriving just as it opens, regardless of the time suggested on your ticket.<br />2. Dress disposal. You will need warm clothes for the several hours from arrival until race time, including the period after you drop off your clothing bag for transport back to Boston. The Athlete’s Village in Hopkinton is a fancy name for a tent, and won’t be much of a refuge. So bring lots of layers of old clothes that you won’t mind ditching before the race alongside the starting line (it’ll be collected for the Salvation Army after the race begins). Also, in case of rain or wind, bring plastic trash bags (lawn-size) to wear over your body. Of course, the best way to stay warm is to hang out on the Colonial club bus until race time.<br />3. Bring Food! Even if you eat breakfast before heading to Hopkinton, it’s still many hours until race time. It’s not a good feeling standing at the starting line and already feeling hungry, before you’ve even begun burning up your glycogen stores in the race itself. There isn’t much decent food to buy in Hopkinton, so bring more food and drinks than you think you could ever need. (Anything left over can go in your finish-line bag—see Tip #9, below.)<br />4. Use sun block. The sun in April is as intense as in August. You will be running with the sun in your face the whole way, at mid-day, most likely after months of winter training in the early morning or evening during the winter. This is a prescription for serious sunburn, if you don’t take precautions. <br />5. Know Where the Woods Are. After trying to stay hydrated all morning, the runners line up in the corrals—and stand there for 30-45 minutes before the race even begins. Many therefore have one thing on their minds once the race begins, and it’s not their first-mile splits. Fortunately, there are lots of woods in the first two miles, especially to the left of the course. (And yes, women use them too.) Afterwards, opportunities dry up, so to speak, through the urbanized sections of Ashland and Framingham, and the next best site is alongside Lake Cochituate just after the 9M mark (but beware of poison ivy). After that, you’re limited to the few Porta-johns and willing gas stations and fast-food joints. <br />6. Course Myth #1: “The first 16 miles are downhill.” Overall, yes—but there are LOTS of uphills (and downhill’s) long before you reach Newton. Pace yourself on the hills early in the race, in order to be in better shape for the better-known ones later. <br />7. Course Myth #2: “The Newton Hills begin at Commonwealth Avenue.” The famous hills begin shortly after 17M, at the turn from Route 16 onto Commonwealth Avenue, and end with Heartbreak Hill before the 21M mark at Boston College. But the hills really begin at the 16M mark in Newton Lower Falls, where the course starts a half-mile climb to the opposite side of Route 128, before descending to the turn onto Commonwealth Ave. The Route 128 hill is a shock to the system after the easy miles preceding it, but the shock will be less if you prepare mentally for five, not four, hilly miles.<br />8. Course Myth #3: “It’s all downhill after Heartbreak Hill.” Yes, the worst is over, but anyone who is struggling at that point is hardly home free. There is a noticeable uphill stretch after the Boston College trolley station, and a gradual climb for a mile from Cleveland Circle to Washington Square along Beacon Street. <br />9. Pack food for the finish line. The official Boston Marathon post-race refreshments have consisted, in the past, of a can of juice, a granola bar, and a bag of potato chips. That’s it, folks! So—be sure to stock your clothing pick-up bag with the fruit, bagels, energy bars, drinks, etc. that you would expect from your average local 5K. (Pack water, too, for the trip home or to your hotel room.) <br />10. On Marathon Day, your last name begins with “B.” When you leave the gated finish area, you come upon the Family Meeting Area, which has signs with letters on them. If your name is Zaworski, do you really want to walk all the way to “Z”? Sotell your friends and family to meet you at “B.” (I’d tell you “A” but too many people already figured this out, and that’s where THEY are going.)
    Bonus Tip: Avoid the Arlington Street Station. The nearest subway station to the exit from the finish area is at Arlington Street on the Green Line, but it’ll be mobbed and the stairs are painfully steep. If you must take the Green Line, walk a few minutes to Boylston Street. Better still, head for the less-crowded Orange Line at Back Bay Station on Clarendon Street. If you are heading to South Station from Back Bay Station, and your timing is right, you may be able to catch an inbound commuter train that’ll get you to South Station in five minutes.


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  • TommyL007 Rookie 93 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007

    Anyone else "hydrating" at Fenway Friday night?

    Serious question. How much damage can 4 or 5 or 6 beers on Friday do to Monday's performance? Is dehydration the main problem with alcohol before a race?

  • PacerChris Amateur 740 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007

    quote:


    Originally posted by TommyL:

    Anyone else "hydrating" at Fenway Friday night?

    Serious question. How much damage can 4 or 5 or 6 beers on Friday do to Monday's performance? Is dehydration the main problem with alcohol before a race?


     



    The main problem would be getting thrown in jail, or recovering from a botched tattoo on a sensitive body part, or waking up next to someone you shouldn't be waking up next to.

    We couldn't score tix again this year - too darn expensive for the whole family.  Enjoy the game!

  • TommyL007 Rookie 93 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007

    quote:


    Originally posted by PacerChris:

    getting thrown in jail, or recovering from a botched tattoo on a sensitive body part, or waking up next to someone you shouldn't be waking up next to.


     




    Sounds like every other Friday night. 

  • dianarunner Rookie 32 posts since
    Apr 21, 2006

    Good luck everyone tomorrow, despite the weather! I know you all have worked so hard for this, so go out and have as much fun as possible. 

  • anneliz36 Rookie 21 posts since
    Oct 16, 2007

    Good luck, Boston Marathoners!  I'll be cheering for you and sending you warm, dry, happy thoughts!  

  • Kettle Jim Rookie 19 posts since
    Feb 22, 2007

    I just read a news report that says 2,449 registered Boston runners failed to pick up their bibs...basically choosing not to run.

    I am not all that knowledgeable about such things, but that number seems very high to me. I realize the weather is bad...and injuries and other issues come up...but to work that hard to qualify and then opt out? Seems crazy to me.

    How many qualifiers drop out pre-race most years? Is 2,449 a historically accurate number?

    Kettle Jim

    ----



    "Running to him was real...it
    was all joy and woe, hard as a
    diamond, it made him weary
    beyond comprehension, but it
    also made him free."

  • Kettle Jim Rookie 19 posts since
    Feb 22, 2007

    I just read a news report that says 2,449 registered Boston runners failed to pick up their bibs...basically choosing not to run.

    I am not all that knowledgeable about such things, but that number seems very high to me. I realize the weather is bad...and injuries and other issues come up...but to work that hard to qualify and then opt out? Seems crazy to me.

    How many qualifiers drop out pre-race most years? Is 2,449 a historically accurate number?

    Kettle Jim

    ----



    "Running to him was real...it
    was all joy and woe, hard as a
    diamond, it made him weary
    beyond comprehension, but it
    also made him free."

  • dhuey040 Rookie 130 posts since
    Jun 30, 2005

    A really big congrats to you Boston runners.  Given the struggles of the professionals, I'd guess that your times are far below your original goals.

    BUT...you persevered through one of the toughest set of conditions in the 111-year history of the race.  Some day, you'll be an old man/woman, and while you watch the race on TV, you'll tell anyone nearby about how you ran the 2007 race.  If those nearby know about this historic race, they'll say, "you ran the 2007 race?! What was it like?"

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