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3265 Views 13 Replies Latest reply: May 13, 2011 10:58 AM by creekfreek RSS
BubbaRef Rookie 7 posts since
Jan 17, 2008
Currently Being Moderated

Jan 17, 2008 6:30 PM

Training to Run Distance after Open Heart Surgery

 

I had open heart surgery quadruple bypass on 11/26/2007 I am trying to start training. I use to run about 20 miles per week. I am now up to 2 to 3 miles walking per day at a 15 minute per mile pace plus stairmaster.

 

 

I am looking for some (on-line) help in finding a training program to build up my running as well as start weight training.

 

 

In addition, I am trying to locate other long distance runners in the Charlotte North Carolina area that have had CABG so I can gain from their experience.

 

 

Also, I am looking for some recommendations on heart monitors and the best basic functions I should look for.

 

 

  • JerryX Legend 851 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Jan 18, 2008 5:38 PM (in response to BubbaRef)
    Re: Training to Run Distance after Open Heart Surgery

    my kid just had his aorta replaced...i hope he feels like you.  I just got the garmin 305...really useful...don't have experience with any others...this one certainly works for me...they are coming out with a garmin 405 but it'll cost @400-450 dollars...i got the 305 for under 200...happy running.





    Happy Running!

  • JHARD Rookie 6 posts since
    Dec 15, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Jan 22, 2008 5:04 PM (in response to BubbaRef)
    Re: Training to Run Distance after Open Heart Surgery

     

    Have I got some good news for you. I had open heart surgery in April of 2005, and ran the Seattle Marathon seven months later. I'm not going to give you one of those "If I can do it . . ." pep talks, but I can offer you encouragement. If I've piqued your interest you're welcome to go to my website, www.jumpstartmyheart.org, and read more about it.

     

     

    I was cleared to run at the 8 week post surgery mark and never looked back. I can do any chest exercise-bench press, bar dips, push ups, etc. so go with confidence once you've been cleared to do so.

     

     

    Also, I've had great success with a Garmin 305 Forerunner HRM. It has a GPS built in and you can purchase a cadence monitor seperately for your bike. I did for triathlon training and it's a sweet addition.

     

     

    Good luck.

     

     

  • JHARD Rookie 6 posts since
    Dec 15, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. Jan 23, 2008 7:13 PM (in response to BubbaRef)
    Re: Training to Run Distance after Open Heart Surgery

     

    I can see where diabetes would be a concern with longer distances but it sounds like you're taking care of that. I'd been a runner off and on for years and did my first marathon in 1997. I had decided, in Sept. 2004, to do another marathon and started training for back-to-back marathons the next Oct/Nov. I'd been training for about 7 months when my symptoms began in very late March 2005. I kept trying to run through the "weird feeling" I kept having until I decided to see my doctor about it. That's when the blockage was discovered in late April and I had my surgery.

     

     

    As far as upper body exercise goes, I'm one for body weight types of exercises first and resistance exercises second. I do pull-ups and push-ups, bar dips, handstand push-ups, etc. as well as pump iron. But as long as you don't have discomfort you can do weight exercises for any muscle group if you don't like the push-ups. Here's a link to a runners website that can give you all kinds of tips on training: http://www.runningplanet.com/training/strength-training.html.

     

     

    I eat oatmeal everyday and have my own special recipe that includes egg whites, cinnamon, vanilla soy protein powder, bananas and blueberries. I top it off with plain yogurt. It might not sound good but I like it. I also eat alot of salmon and veggies and bought a Jack LaLaine juicer and drink a carrot, cerely, spinach and garlic clove juice every day. Check out the Mediterranian Diet pyramid for other suggestions.

     

     

    Keep those questions coming!

     

     

  • JHARD Rookie 6 posts since
    Dec 15, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. Jan 24, 2008 5:16 AM (in response to BubbaRef)
    Re: Training to Run Distance after Open Heart Surgery

     

    My answer to your question would be "yes." Most patients, after being discharged, go through a three month rehabilitation program. For the most part this consists of one day a week in rehab doing treadmill and/or exercycle workouts. Day one might be somethong like five minutes on a treadmill at 2mph. If the patient can do that relatively easy they would walk two times a day at home for five minutes at a stretch. The second week might be walking two times a day for ten minutes. If you carry it out to the end you might be walking twice a day for forty-five minutes each or maybe once a day for 90 minutes at around 4mph. Throw in some stretching and that's it.

     

     

    Usually the first visit to rehab is for evaluation to see what an individual patient is capable of and goes from there. In my case, I didn't have a heart attack prior to surgery and was able to start running again at the 8 week point. I wasn't allowed to do upper body work for the full twelve weeks but after that I was cleared to lift, etc. I know the feeling of seeing my upper body go soft, and hated it, but the sternum must fuse back together properly to retain structural integrity. It takes the full twelve weeks for this to occur. But after that a person should be able to go back to lifting.

     

     

    What is your current level of fitness? What do you daily as far as exercise? It looks like it's been around 8 weeks since your surgery, are you able to jog? It can help to have someone to walk/jog with for inspiration and to help take away the feeling that your going it alone.

     

     

    I hope this helps.

     

     

  • JHARD Rookie 6 posts since
    Dec 15, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    9. Jan 25, 2008 5:10 AM (in response to BubbaRef)
    Re: Training to Run Distance after Open Heart Surgery

     

    The Charlotte program sounds similar to the program here, with the EKG monitor and food counseling, etc.  I found it very helpful and still refer to it almost three years later. My rehab dept. has books and DVD's to loan out, maybe you can do that with the Charlotte location.

     

     

    It sounds like you already know how to get in shape and are willing to do the work and that's a good thing. I see people in rehab and all this is new to them and they don't really like having to exercise so you have that working for you.  Since you're cleared to run again maybe the best thing for you is to get a heart monitor and work back up to your prior level of training on your own. It's not always easy to workout at home but a few dumbells and a fitness ball could be all you need. A fitness ball is an inflatable ball about knee height or a little bigger that you can use to do core work. I have a number of exercises for that and recommend it highly. Let me know if you're interested in that.

     

     

     

     

     

  • Ty LB Rookie 3 posts since
    Oct 1, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    11. Jan 26, 2008 10:57 AM (in response to BubbaRef)
    Re: Training to Run Distance after Open Heart Surgery

    Just wanted to wish you luck in your return to running after surgery! I work as an exercise physiologist in a Cardiac Rehab gym and lately I am seeing more people who are running after surgery. So you are not alone! Sounds like you are on the right track. Ease into things; the heart rate monitor is key, I think using a walk/run approach is a great idea, and always make sure to give yourself a good warm up and cool down. Happy running!

  • JHARD Rookie 6 posts since
    Dec 15, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    12. Jan 26, 2008 11:33 AM (in response to BubbaRef)
    Re: Training to Run Distance after Open Heart Surgery

     

    These FB exercises are just to get you started. There are several but just doing a few for now is best I think.

     

     

    1) FB Crunch- You sit on the ball and roll forward until you're about to fall off. This is the starting point. Lay back on the ball with your arms crossed so that your hand is touching the opposite shoulder. You should be flat on top of the ball and simply begin the crunch motion stopping forward progress when you're sitting upright. I do 25 reps.

     

     

    2) FB V-ups- These are tough at first. Lay flat on a mat with the FB between your feet. Do a V-up lifting the ball with your feet. Transfer FB to your hands and lay flat again touching FB to the floor. Repeat and transfer back to your feet. This is one rep. I do 15.

     

     

    3) FB Leg Curl- Lay flat on your back with the FB beneath your achilles area. Lift your hips off the ground so that your body forms as straight a line as possible. This is the starting position. Curl your legs so that your feet rest on top of the ball then straighten back out to the starting position. This is one rep. I do 20.

     

     

    As I said, there are many more to do. I chose these as a good basic starting point that incorporates strength, flexibility, and balance. I suggest doing them in this order: 1,2,3,1. When you can do all the reps then do this: 1,2,3,1,2,3. When you can do this three times a week let me know and I'll be happy to give you more.

     

     

     

     

     

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  • creekfreek Rookie 3 posts since
    May 13, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    13. May 13, 2011 10:58 AM (in response to BubbaRef)
    Re: Training to Run Distance after Open Heart Surgery

    I am pretty excited to find both this forum as well as this particular thread. I had multiples heart attacks 12 weeks ago resulting in triple bypass surgery.  The doctor seem to think that I was lucky to have survived. While still in ICU I promised my daughter to get better and run a 5K marathon with her before the year was out. Since then, I have had numerous medical people offer the opinion that I was being too optimistic in my recovery goals. I'm currently on week 8 of my cardio rehab program. I had a lot of difficulty convincing the nurse monitors that I needed to get my heart rate up to my target of 125bpm to begin to improve ( I'm 54yrs). Their goal seemed mostly to prevent me from injuring myself, which they pursued vigorously. I am now doing a run/walk routine but my pace still hasn't gotten much below 19mm.  I have started some strength training to rebuild lost upperbody muscle, I'm kayaking, hiking, biking and doing everything that I can to increase my level of fitness.  For the first time I'm actually eating healthy and trying to develop and maintain a healthy lifestyle.  Knowing that this had successfully been done before makes it easier to stay on track. Thanks to all the "Bridge Builders"

     

    Marty

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