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3509 Views 4 Replies Latest reply: Apr 15, 2008 6:45 PM by paprouty RSS
morrison1002 Amateur 12 posts since
Jul 9, 2007
Currently Being Moderated

Feb 11, 2008 1:23 AM

pain in upper arms on long rides

When I go on long bike rides. Either one arm or both arms start to hurt. most up in the top of the arm.  Do I need to lift more weights to get my arms stronger to be able to deal with extend period of time I do that to my arms. Or just do more long bikes rides to get my arms used to it.  and the only thing that helps it when I ride is not tensing up the arm at all and just letting it hang while i coast.

  • omabikeryder Legend 289 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Feb 13, 2008 3:12 PM (in response to morrison1002)
    Re: pain in upper arms on long rides

     

    Define the tops of your arms.  Forearms, deltoids, hands?  What kind of bike?

     

     

    First solution is to have your bike fitted.  You might be reaching to far or putting to much weight on your hands.  Second, get a good pair of bike gloves.  Third, don't tense your arms and shoulders when you ride.  Fourth, relax your grip on the handlebars, and move your hands to different positions. 

     

     

    If you ride for long distances, somethings going to hurt. 

     

     

  • omabikeryder Legend 289 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Feb 19, 2008 1:37 PM (in response to morrison1002)
    Re: pain in upper arms on long rides

    That's a little unusual.  Have your bike checked for fit, make sure you are not reaching too far and handlebars are at correct width.  Also check your posture while riding, grip should be relaxed, shoulders relaxed.  If you are lifting during the off season, try adding some exercises to strengthen your arms, and delts.

  • paprouty Amateur 8 posts since
    Jan 4, 2008

     

    How is the pain now?  Some things just take time for the body to adjust to.  My first inclination to your post is that you are putting to much weight on your upper body.  Proper fit is definetly the first place to start.  Go to your local bike shop and get fitted.  If you bought your bike there it should be free.  As with all endurance sports you must learn to relax while working or in your case pedaling.  Adjust your hand position from time to time from hoods, to drops, to tops. etc...  Get out of the saddle for a few pedal strokes. 

     

     

    Just a few comments about a proper fit.  Wear your bike gear or atleast your shorts and obviously shoes.  Treat a fit like a work out.  You should work up a sweat.  A good technician is going to put you and your bike on a trainer and let you spin, make some adjustment on any glaring problems then he or she will let you spin for at least 10 to 15 minutes and let you settle into your position, watching you the whole time to see how you adjust yourself to your bike and your position, from there the technician will have clues to how to fine tune your fit.  Get a professional fit on any new bike you get in the future too.

     

     

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