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22302 Views 109 Replies Latest reply: Jul 3, 2008 4:30 PM by JR007 Go to original post 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 Previous Next
  • Lady Vader Rookie 27 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    75. Mar 31, 2008 7:54 AM (in response to Stellaaaaa)
    Re: Why don't people train properly for marathons?

     

    Thank you!

     

     

    In shorter races I'm even faster.

     

     

    Yes, I don't know that many people (any, actually) who can actually walk 10 minutes per mile for any sustained amount of time.

     

     

    Either way, I'm not worried about what people think.  If they want to waste the energy being angry, they're more than welcome to.

     

     

  • Jim Sullivan032 Rookie 504 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    76. Mar 31, 2008 8:40 AM (in response to Lady Vader)
    Re: Why don't people train properly for marathons?
    Lady Vader wrote:

     

    ...Either way, I'm not worried about what people think...

     

     

     

    For some reason, I had gotten a different impression.

  • Lady Vader Rookie 27 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007

     

    You're allowed to have any impression you'd like.  I'm not concerned with people's opinions.  I'm very happy with my progress and ability.  However, that doesn't mean I shouldn't feel free to reply to a discussion.

     

     

  • bronco59us Rookie 2 posts since
    Oct 4, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    78. Apr 1, 2008 12:47 PM (in response to Lady Vader)
    Re: Why don't people train properly for marathons?

    The thing is, who cares?  Everybody has different motivations, different abilities and different goals.  Even if someone "only" walks 26.2 miles, that's certainly a better goal than sitting around on the couch and doing nothing.  Sure, some people may have more potential than they are realizing, but again....so what?  About 15 months ago, just a few weeks past my 47th birthday, I decided to start training for my first marathon.  Six months later, I did it, finishing in 3:45.  Six months after that, I qualified for Boston with a time of 3:29.  What does that mean?  Nothing.  There are plenty of people who run sub 3:00 marathons that are saying, wow, that's slow.  Do I care?  Absolutely not.  I am out there to compete against myself....to be the best that I can be, not the best that somebody else thinks I should be.  For those who are "really serious", the reward is as simple as how well you finish overall,  or within your age group.   The absolute ONLY thing that annoys me is walkers or slower runners that line up to far forward making it near impossible for the runners who line up properly to get into a steady pace.  Beyond that, kudo's to anyone who takes the initiative to do something to improve their health....even if it's "only" walking.

  • Kimberly Pfannebecker Rookie 2 posts since
    Apr 3, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    79. Apr 3, 2008 6:54 PM (in response to bronco59us)
    Re: Why don't people train properly for marathons?

    Thank you Bronco, I just joined today and I was amazed by the few posts I read.  Who cares what motivates a person to run?  The fact that he or she is taking the time to set a goal and do their best to achieve that goal is more than enough, whether or not they train.  I finished a half-marathon in October and am about to run another in a couple of days.  I'm pretty good about my training, missing only a one day and improving my times each and every week, and I'm still not expecting to blow anyone's mind with my time.  My goal is to improve upon my time and see where it takes me.  If I run another half, great.  If I run a marathon, or complete a triathalon or NEVER RUN AGAIN, no one will suffer but me.  So if someone doesn't train properly, you're going to pass them anyway and never have to deal with them again.  Let them achieve their goals.  I'm certain that the person you pass in a marathon has a skill or ability in which they succeed far more often than you do.

  • bronco59us Rookie 2 posts since
    Oct 4, 2007

    Hey Kim, congrats on the half marathon.   Don't let some of the posts discourage you.....whatever it is that motivates you, good for you.  The one thing I've learned about goals in the year and half that I've been running is, it's good to have them, but even if you don't reach them it doesn't mean failure.  No matter how well you train and plan, sometimes things are just out of your control.....like the weather, or an untimely injury or any number of things.  Failure would be not learning from something from every experience and using that knowledge in pursuing your next goal.  Good luck with your next race....it'll be great!

  • Kimberly Pfannebecker Rookie 2 posts since
    Apr 3, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    81. Apr 6, 2008 7:50 PM (in response to bronco59us)
    Re: Why don't people train properly for marathons?

    Thanks, the run went very well today!  I ran it in the time I wanted, despite a sore knee.  I'm doing another in a few weeks, then it's time for a break.  Also, thanks for the encouragement.  I'm sure not every race will go well, so I appreciate the advice about learning from all of my running experiences.  Good luck to you in all of your future runs!

  • Markedoc Rookie 4 posts since
    Jan 15, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    82. Apr 14, 2008 12:19 PM (in response to ioffirst)
    Re: Why don't people train properly for marathons?

    I agree - many people don't take the time to accumulate the miles and get their bodies ready to run the marathon.  To each his own, but the various running boards are full of posts from people who are training for a 10k in April and expecting to run a marathon this summer, and injury board full of people injured half way through their training "schedule".  Personally, I am honing my half marathon skills (if you can call them that) this year, and would consider a full M next year if I feel i can devote the proper time to training AND get my weight down another 10-15 lbs so i can run that distance more effectively.  This year's goal (for me) is to get from 1:52 time now to somewhere below 1:45.

     

    A lot of people run one marathon and it's one and done, and they can forever tell the world they ran a marathon.

  • SportiGrl Pro 470 posts since
    Jul 22, 2004
    Currently Being Moderated
    83. Apr 15, 2008 2:43 PM (in response to Markedoc)
    Re: Why don't people train properly for marathons?

     

    Every person is different.  The amount of training they can handle and the quickness they can go from couch to marathon.  I went from a broken foot to 15 MPW for 6 months over the fall and winter and then jumped into a racing series that spring and summer and ended with a marathon that fall.  I wasn't plagued with injuries and I beat my Boston qualifying time by 19 minutes and felt great at the end of my first marathon. 

     

     

    I ran in high school, 20 years earlier, and just decided if I was going to run races I was going to train and I read a few books and visited the boards here and mostly followed the marathon outline in the Pfitzinger/Douglas book 'Road Racing for Serious Runners'.    I ran about 12 races that summer and ended up snagging 2nd in a race series for my age group that year.  If I'd listened to most of the posts on this thread (and the discussions that were around that year;-)  ,  I would have just kept running easy miles and base building all that time rather than having fun and seeing what I was really capable of that year.

     

     

    I will say that my first marathon, that fall, was a bit frustrating to pace since there weren't any corrals and there was also a 1/2 marathon that merged back in with the faster marathoners at a little past the 5 mile mark; it was just harder to weave and bob and get a steady pace.  I really liked Boston and the fact it was in time-based corrals.

     

     

    Anyways, my view is that it's awesome that so many folks are running for fun, fitness, and competition ... but I do really wish more of the races bothered to do corrals and make sure the runners line up generally where they should so things aren't so bogged down and frustrating.

     

     

  • haroldson5 Rookie 1 posts since
    Nov 8, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    84. Apr 20, 2008 10:56 AM (in response to ioffirst)
    Re: Why don't people train properly for marathons?

    "Oh it's not really a big deal. I suppose that as someone who really busts his butt to race a marathon I take mild offense when someone who barely trains, then walks part of the way, thinks they've done something monumental. They haven't."

     

     

     

     

     

    Did you win? Then you didn't train hard enough. They trained to FINISH, you trained to RACE. Who reached their goal?

  • IndyTurbulence Rookie 4 posts since
    Nov 2, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    85. Apr 21, 2008 11:56 AM (in response to ioffirst)
    Re: Why don't people train properly for marathons?

     

    I sort of see both sides of this arguement (forgive me for being new - I used to be active at the old coolrunners but just got my new ID figured out)

     

     

    I am fine with the 5-6hour runner when it is a first timer, or doing it for a cause, or doing it on a bet, etc.  I struggle to see why so many people do 1-2+ marathons a year at 5 and 6 hours.  I am NOT saying that they should not be there, just that I do not get it.

     

     

    I have not run a full marry as of yet.  Not sure if I will.  I will only do it when I am sure I can do it a good bit under 4 hours.  I have run many sub 2 halves with a best of 1:48.  I want to get to under 1:40 in a half before I start thinking about a full.

     

     

    I think part of the issue is the American way of more is better.  Someone does a half on a dare . . . they do it in like 2:45.  Well, if 13.1 is good, 26.2 has to be better.  You see it on the Tri side as well (of which I was active until I gave up swimming this spring).  More is always better.  I think the real issue is how people feel about it and how it relates to others.  I know someone who has run a bunch of full marrys (all well over 5 hours) and they just think any runner who has not done one is not a runner.  They see the marry as some unreal accommplishment, but I see what they are doing as essentially walking 26.2 miles.  Yeah.

     

     

    A lot of people that do long events over and over at a slower pace are overweight.  Yes, it is good that they are doing something, but I think for many it is nearly counter-productive.  I think they see it as a 'free pass' to be fat.  They can just make sure everyone knows they do marathons and they believe others will think they are fit.  I

     

     

     

     

     

    As others said, if the race is good about corrals, I could really care less.  I grab my bottle of water and head home as soon as I finish anyway, so if people are slower than I have less traffic. 

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • littlewaywelt Rookie 182 posts since
    Apr 1, 2005
    Currently Being Moderated
    86. Apr 25, 2008 7:15 AM (in response to ioffirst)
    Re: Why don't people train properly for marathons?

    First, "proper training" is a silly term.  What's proper for one isn't for another and who sets the bar?  The fact that you think the avg pace is sad is incredibly elitist of you.

     

     

     

     

     

    Some ppl are just interested in completing the race and enjoying it for

    what it is, a long run, a personal goal to complete one, etc.  They

    aren't interested in running as fast as they are capable of running or

    in a pain free race.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    I can think of two reasons that people don't train to a level that would allow them to be as fast as they are capable of running. First completing a marathon (imho) is vastly overrated in terms of difficulty, so some ppl don't need to "train properly." Second, for some it's purely a casual affair, and life, kids, family, work and fun take priority.  Race day shows up and those ppl just run and have fun at race day for what it is.

     

     

    Personally, I take my training seriously...as seriously as I can with 2 young kids and a life outside running to deal with.

  • SportiGrl Pro 470 posts since
    Jul 22, 2004
    Currently Being Moderated
    87. Apr 25, 2008 10:29 AM (in response to haroldson5)
    Re: Why don't people train properly for marathons?

     

    Just a small point here ... winning and racing aren't the same thing. 

     

     

    Racing is 1)a contest of speed in reaching a certain point or in doing or achieving something - an effort to get something done before a certain time.

     

     

    *this was from my dictionary ... setting a goal and entering a contest seem to be what a race is, not how fast you decide your goal should be.

     

     

    I teach/lead some aerobics classes and also see people on a regular basis training for running or other race events ... I'm glad they are doing this ... I do know that

     

     

    quite a few of them have very low expectations for themselves and wish they had more confidence to try and push the envelope and see what they really are capable of

     

     

    But they are trying ... they are more fit than they would otherwise be ... and they are actually doing the best they currently believe they are capable of (even though I, in my infinite haha wisdom, know they could do even better).  <<notice the tongue-in-cheek, okay!?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Lady Vader Rookie 27 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    88. Apr 25, 2008 10:37 AM (in response to ioffirst)
    Re: Why don't people train properly for marathons?

     

    What if I follow a recommended training plan, push myself as hard as I can without injuring myself or hating running, and just because of genetics (being short and not built to run) don't happen to run very fast?  I'm still out there pushing myself.  I've gotten faster and extended the distances I am able to run, so it'd hardly be fair to say that I'm just lollygagging (I think that's the first time I've ever used that work) about out there.

     

     

    One time I came in fourth place in my age group out of 28 women.  Other times I've been near the back of the pack.  But I always get out there and try, and always have fun.

     

     

    If anyone out there feels bad because of what some of the posters here have said, please don't.  You have to do what makes you happy, not what makes others happy.

     

     

  • MarathonDream Pro 288 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    89. Apr 25, 2008 11:10 AM (in response to ioffirst)
    Re: Why don't people train properly for marathons?

     

    Reading over this thread, I have to say that both sides have some very good points.

     

     

    Yes, I do agree that it is better to have run a marathon than sitting on the couch. The simple fact that people are beginning to get active makes me think we may have taken a turn in our society. It's amazing what changes the mind goes through once you put in miles and hours of work. You begin to become conscious of your intake and tend to turn down the high calories and stick with something that will help your performance. Your day to day routine involves taking care of your body and focusing on how you can better yourself.

     

     

    I do believe there is a big difference in training regiment for a 6 hr runner and a 3 - 4 hour runner. No matter how slow you begin your base building I have to think your body must speed up by the time you are able to reach 45 - 60 miles per week. The major factors in slower running are cardio and body weight. You cannot convince me that if you are capable of running the proper weekly totals that you can't pick up the pace. I have run many long runs of 20 miles or more and there is no way I would continue to do so if it took me 5 hours of my time to complete.

     

     

    With this being said, I don't have any idea how head strong a 5 to 6 hour runner is. What drives a person to continue to put one foot in front of the other even when they know it's going to take a long time? The marathon to most isn't about coming in at above the averages but rather pushing yourself to the max and finding out how far you can go. It has a lot to do with trying to capture a little of that competitive spirit we had when we were young.

     

     

    So no matter if you finish in 3, 4, 5 or 6 hours you should be proud you did it. BUT - don't run a marathon because others around you are doing it. Do it with the intention to do better the next time. One of the worst memories I have is coming across the finish line 1 minute above my goal last October. The clock read 4:01 but I really thought I had failed. So what do you do? Quit, give up or try again?

     

     

    I know what I'm doing. I hope to see all next week @ The Flying Pig Marathon. Bring your watches and cool outfits. I'll drink a beer with any finishers no matter what your time and welcome you to our unbelievable life changing group called -"Marathoners".

     

     

    Stay Healthy!

     

     

     

     

     





    Training For: 50k Ultra Marathon (2nd)

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