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2224 Views 2 Replies Latest reply: Apr 28, 2008 6:04 AM by bruncle RSS
RunningNurse75 Rookie 1 posts since
Dec 14, 2007
Currently Being Moderated

Apr 27, 2008 4:00 PM

2 questions.. How do I lengthen my stride and HOW DO I AMP MY RUNNING TO LOSE SOME WEIGHT

 

Been running pretty consistently for a little over a year now and still haven't figured out how to lengthen my stride.  It seems to be the same as this time last year.  Will lengthening my stride help improve my time or endurance? 

 

 

Second, I lost around 30 pounds when I first started running (that is why I stuck with it) but can not seem to lose the last 15 - 20 pounds that I orginally set out to lose.  I certainly don't eat as well as I should.  I run at least 3 times a week (usually 5k between 28 - 30 minutes, sometimes longer distances, sometimes shorter).  I have also started biking and doing weighted hula hoop.  Any great ideas on how to amp it up and get the rest of this weight off?

 

 

 

 

 

  • TimS032977 Rookie 8 posts since
    Mar 27, 2008

     

    Hate to be the bearer of bad news, but I think (and it's only an opinion) you aren't going to lose the last 15-20 simply by lengthening your stride...gotta change the diet.  When I started running I didn't change my diet and I plateaued just like you are, and then I started eating better and the weight dropped like nothing and I'm still losing weight.  But if you do go the diet route come up with something you can stick to.  Good luck!

     

     

  • bruncle Legend 725 posts since
    Sep 26, 2005

     

    1. No consciously lengthening your stride will increase your risk of injury because you will be overstriding. Your feet should land close to your body, not far out in front. Otherwise you will be increasing the amount of time you spend in the air, which reduces your efficiency and you will land on your heel, which acts like a giant brake and sends shockwaves up your legs. As you get fitter, your stride length will naturally increase in line with improvements in your racing pace.                 

     

     

    2. Concentrate on your diet. Unless you're running more than 50mpw, running doesn't provide much of a stimulus to lose weight. That being said, each extra mile you run is 100 calories burnt, so increasing your mileage could help. 

     

     

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