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16900 Views 67 Replies Latest reply: Jul 31, 2008 3:31 PM by staving off decrepitude RSS 1 2 3 ... 5 Previous Next
staving off decrepitude Legend 1,193 posts since
Dec 14, 2007
Currently Being Moderated

Jul 7, 2008 6:38 AM

recovering from long runs

 

Jimmy, you don't get to answer this, because you don't need to recover from 15 mile runs. They are a mere skip in the park for you!  But the rest of you mortals for whom 15 miles seems pretty durn long, how quickly do you recover from your long runs?  After yesterday's 15 miles I felt fine, took a couple of tylenols & cookies, iced my knees & ankles, and just relaxed and napped most of the day.  Got up to milk the goats and unload a small truck full of mulch into the garden.  I developed a very very slight headache a couple hours after the run was over which stuck with me until the early evening.  Today I feel fine, not sore at all.

 

 

After my last few long runs I've developed a moderate dull headache a couple hours after the run which stuck with me all day. (That's why I took tylenol yesterday, to head it off).  I wasn't able to really rest after those runs as I had visiting, working, and other stuff scheduled.  I felt like I really needed a nap.  I hadn't gotten to bed as early as I wanted to the night before those runs either, although not terribly late. Ended up with about 7 hours of sleep. ( I prefer 9 hours)  

 

 

Is anyone else getting these headaches? Do you think I just need more sleep?  I'm pretty sure I'm not under or over hydrating on my runs.  I run early to avoid the heat, although it's still humid and fairly warm by the end of the run (since I'm slow).  I used to get headaches as a child from being in the heat or sun too much.

 

 





Chocolate is very nice.
  • HALOjen Legend 1,305 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    Re: recovering from long runs

    I'm really interested in the responses to this post.  I don't get headaches, but I do get muscle soreness.  Some long runs seem to take it out of me more than others.  If I have had a long run that seems to kick my tail, I take advil, drink lots of fluids, and try to rest as much as possible.  Is there something else I should be doing that I am not?  In terms of working out, I am not sure how much to push it the next day.  I am still sore, but is it okay to do my recovery run?  I guess the answer to that will come with experience!





    I will run for cupcakes!!

  • DCtoPgh Community Moderator 3,033 posts since
    Aug 15, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. Jul 7, 2008 7:15 AM (in response to HALOjen)
    Re: recovering from long runs

     

    Lee, it's funny you mention this because I got the worst headache yesterday; I was worried it was migraine-bound. As far as the headaches I've had them before but haven't put enough into investigating what might be the common denominator. I think yesterday it might have been one of two things: 1) I tried Succeed caps for maybe the third time and I was thinking I might not have had enough water to compensate for the excess salt; 2) I made the mistake of lifting upper body Saturday and I was sore. I think this may have led to a tension headache from doing something funny with my upper body to compensate for the weakness from lifting. 

     

     

     

     

     

    In terms of muscles and body aches I'm not sure what the key ingredient is, but for long runs hydration, ice baths and a protein shake when I get home have always done their job in the past. I don't think I've ever been sore past the long run day itself (for me, Sunday). Even after the marathon I carried my duffle bag up and down three flights of stairs (walking forwards ) and only had problems the day after trying to get out of a booth at a restaurant. I remember feeling like I might not have pushed hard enough because I wasn't as sore as everyone else had made me expect I would be.

     

     





    I do today what you won't, so tomorrow I do what you can't.


    My Blog | i2P

  • Andrew... Legend 273 posts since
    Jan 24, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    Re: recovering from long runs

     

    Staving - Might want to give some thought to your electrolyte balance. Do you feel an urge to eat a bag of salty potato chips or inhale several bananas?

     

     

     

     

     

    Curly J - Might want to make sure you ingest some protein in your post-recovery noshing. As for receovery runs the next day, just make sure they are slow and easy.  If it works for you, great. If not, no need to worry.

     

     

     

     

     

    Happy Running,

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,267 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    Re: recovering from long runs

     

    I find there are two recovery periods.  The immediate effects, soreness, takes one to two days.  Being active later the same day reduces the time.  I also have more lingering effects that I can feel in my workouts for as much as a week - a little "background soreness' - so I know I'm not quite back from the long run.  And I get headaches sometimes as well.  All of this varies in direct proportion to the long run itself.  Not necessarily how long or hard it was, but how hard I worked while I was out there.  Sometimes I run with more tension than other times.  I'm tight and almost battling myself the whole time.  These days have more after-effects.  The days when I run relaxed are much better and I recover faster.  The headaches I think are due to two things.  Part of it is dehydration.  Re-hydrating quickly when I get home seems to make them milder or prevent them altogether.  The other part is running tense vs. relaxed.  I usually get a headache on days when I feel like I've been flogging myself on the run.

     

     





    Len

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,267 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    Re: recovering from long runs

    From what I've been reading lately, a small amount of swelling in the extremities is normal/expected.  Excessive swelling can be a sign of water retention/hypnoatremia/not enough electrolytes.





    Len

  • Nursesus Rookie 1 posts since
    May 21, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    Re: recovering from long runs

    To bounce off of the question of the headaches.... I too am a headache suffer.  I have a history of migraines.  Had them since the first grade.  Cannot work out on the treadmill because I ALWAYS get a migraine.  Started running outdoors in January.  Everytime I start a new/ longer workout, I get a migraine.  Even ran a race and started getting a migraine.  Does anyone experience this?.  Have talked with my MD about exercise migraines and he just shrugged his shoulders.  I try to head them off (no pun intended) by taking Ibuprofen before I run- sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't.  Just curious.  I too make sure I am well hydrated and stretched before running.  BTW- I am not a marathoner- yet!  I just completed my first 10K- working toward my first 1/2 marathon in Nov.  Migraine or not!

  • Steelers21 Legend 592 posts since
    Apr 8, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    9. Jul 7, 2008 8:03 AM (in response to Nursesus)
    Re: recovering from long runs
    Nursesus wrote:

    To bounce off of the question of the headaches.... I too am a headache suffer. I have a history of migraines. Had them since the first grade. Cannot work out on the treadmill because I ALWAYS get a migraine. Does anyone experience this?. BTW- I am not a marathoner- yet! I just completed my first 10K- working toward my first 1/2 marathon in Nov. Migraine or not!

     

     

    Kudos to running despite the migraines. It is tough to overcome the inertia of inactivity when we have no other barriers or physical limitations in our path, but doing so when we have to face something like migraines is quite impressive.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    I do not suffer migraines or headaches from running. I cannot help answer your question, but I suspect that some other posters will have valuable insight. I just wanted to say "good job" for running despite the migraines, and keep up the good work.

  • Steelers21 Legend 592 posts since
    Apr 8, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    Re: recovering from long runs

     

    To answer the question posed by Lee (I think that Staving is Lee . . . I need a scorecard) - ice baths.  After every long run, 10 minutes in the tub with 14 lbs. of ice.  Really helps the feet, legs, ankles, knees and even the low back.

     

     

     

     

     

    I have gone 8 miles and felt worse the day after than when I did 12 or 13, because I did not do an ice bath after the 8 miles.  I have come to learn that basically any run farther than 10k, an ice bath helps recovery very much.

     

     

     

     

     

    The ice baths were tough in February and March of this year (cold conditions), but now that I am hot as heck, the ice bath is a welcome end to the run.  I look forward to my Carnation Instant Breakfast and ice bath at the end of the run - they keep me going.

     

     

  • MCM Ron Legend 1,916 posts since
    Jan 19, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    Re: recovering from long runs

     

    Lee,

     

     

    I used to get headaches fairly frequently after lengthy runs, even when I had thought I had hydrated well enough.  In the last year and a half I've made the point to REALLY hydrate, and I very rarely get those headaches now.  I wouldn't assume that just because you can pee means that you've hydrated enough.  Those childhood headaches were probably dehydration headaches.

     

     





    To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world.  (from my ice tea lid)

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,267 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    Re: recovering from long runs

     

    Lee, there are two things to check after your run.

     

     

    - The color of your urine - it should be a pale yellow, like lemonade.  If it's darker, you are still somewhat dehydrated.

     

     

    - This one is a before-and-after.  Weigh yourself before you go (no clothes) and after you get back (again, no clothes).  The decrease in weight when you get back is your water deficit.  You need a quart of fluid for every two pounds you lost to get back to your hydration state before you left.  (I guess it's possible but unlikely for you to weigh more when you finish.)

     

     

    If you're not sore then I think you're doing it right.  I know those are the times I feel like I hit it on the nose.  On your long runs you should stay at your target pace (marathon goal plus 1 to 2 minutes per mile) and you probably should feel like you could have gone faster.  Save it for the race.

     

     





    Len

  • KarlD_Navy84 Legend 879 posts since
    Jan 19, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    14. Jul 7, 2008 9:00 AM (in response to lenzlaw)
    Re: recovering from long runs

     

    These are all very interesting comments.  Up to now, I haven't had any issues with headaches (knock on wood).  After I finish a long run, I have my recovery drink (Endurox) and take a nice cool bath.  I'm like Lee - not a big fan of dumping the ice in there.  Anyway, between the recovery drink and the stretching throughout the day, I am usually good to go for the next day's cross training workout (45 minutes on the stationary bike).  That no impact day helps me be ready for either my interval or tempo run the day after that.  I concur with Len that the headaches could be due to a hydration/electolyte issue.  Two years ago, I had a slight headache after a 20 mile run,  and that was part of the problem. I was fine about 2 hours later after I had gotten something to eat and drink.  Talk to you soon.

     

     

     

    Karl

     

     





    Karl

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