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6884 Views 11 Replies Latest reply: Jul 23, 2008 11:15 PM by bnadine RSS
bnadine Rookie 5 posts since
Jul 18, 2008
Currently Being Moderated

Jul 18, 2008 12:53 AM

New to Triathlon

I am a 57 year old female that has never entered anything like a race.  I have been swimming for an hour every day for the past year and would like to kick up my workouts.  A triathlon sounds interesting.  But I think I must be crazy to consider something like this.  I know how to ride a bike, but can't remember when I actually did.  I used to jog, but that was back before I had kids!  Any comments and advice would be very much appreciated.

  • Joe_h1 Community Moderator 1,833 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Jul 18, 2008 8:25 AM (in response to bnadine)
    give it a try you'll love it

    this sport doesn't have to be fancy. any bike w/ two wheels will work (except for those crazy recumbents) mtn and hybrid bikes are normally at the racks at tri's.  definitely get yourself some good running shoes (not tennis shoes) and start out slow even allow for small walking breaks if you need to. actually when starting out just keep your pace for the bike and run at conversation pace - if you can't talk you're working too hard! check around for a local running/cycling/tri club to keep you company and help you out in the start. hope that helps!





    goals for 2011:

    break 19minutes for 5k

    break 2:42 for olympic triathlon probably Anthracite olympic

    break 3:16 for marathon ( a long shot but it's fun putting yourself out there)

  • kwishum Rookie 2 posts since
    Jan 15, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Jul 21, 2008 3:12 AM (in response to bnadine)
    Re: give it a try you'll love it

     

    Crazy? Absolutely not! If you're swimming an hour a day,  you've already conquered the part of a tri that frightens most of us.

     

     

    Being active and pushing yourself to a new challenge is never crazy. I agree with the advice to start slow. Make it your goal to finish, not win. And, look for a sprint tri to start with so the distances aren't long. Allow plenty of lead time to prepare. If you've not done any running or biking, I'd suggest at least 6 months to build up to the necessary distances. Personally, I'd also recommend finding someone "crazy" enough to do this with you. Training alone isn't much fun and takes a lot more self-discipline. Having a partner holds you accountable and "forces" you to show up for training runs or rides.

     

     

    Mostly, have fun and be proud of yourself for staying active.

     

     

  • itisI Rookie 1 posts since
    Jul 21, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. Jul 21, 2008 6:35 AM (in response to bnadine)
    Re: New to Triathlon

    I just finished my first triathlon.  I did the Danskin race which also has a training component.  It is an all women event and is geared toward first timers.  It was a great experience!

  • Joe_h1 Community Moderator 1,833 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    6. Jul 21, 2008 6:35 AM (in response to bnadine)
    Re: give it a try you'll love it

    stationary bike will do for now till you get a new bike. have fun you can do this!





    goals for 2011:

    break 19minutes for 5k

    break 2:42 for olympic triathlon probably Anthracite olympic

    break 3:16 for marathon ( a long shot but it's fun putting yourself out there)

  • krzyski Rookie 1 posts since
    Oct 25, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. Jul 21, 2008 9:08 AM (in response to bnadine)
    Re: New to Triathlon

    Welcome to triathlons!  I was 54 when I first did a tri (offroad) - with my daughter.  She found some workouts online to gets us started - and we're still doing them together.  It's not crazy - just a new chapter in your life.  Once you've finished a tri, consider yourself a triathlete, and you'll be hooked.  Look for a sprint distance event.  The Danskin and Tri for the Cure are great events for newbies.  As a swimmer, you have an advantage over many - being comfortable in the water is hard for many triathletes.  As for the bike, for a beginner, a hybrid, mountain or road bike will work just fine.  Make sure you get good running shoes to train in, and race in (your knees will thank you).  Tell your friends about your new adventure - they'll come to support you; and it keeps your training incentive high.  My kids and I are doing an offroad tri in Vail this summer as a team (I get to do the mile swim in a mountain lake), and I'll do a sprint tri in Denver this fall.  My goals are simple - finish with a smile on my face!!

     

    Good luck with your new adventure!

  • Joseph Vias Rookie 2 posts since
    Oct 1, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    8. Jul 21, 2008 9:52 AM (in response to bnadine)
    Re: New to Triathlon

    One thing that all the above haven't taking into account is relays.  Many Triatheletes don't like swimming, running, and/or biking.  I myself have bad legs so I do the swim, and bike and have a friend do the run.  It is a great way to ease your way into triathlons and get the Transitions under control. Join a group, team, etc and have a great time.

  • SEGster Rookie 1 posts since
    Jul 23, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    10. Jul 23, 2008 10:14 AM (in response to bnadine)
    Re: New to Triathlon

    I completed my first sprint just over a month ago at Danskin in California.  Now I'm getting ready for my next one.  I'm 48, not exactly athletic, and have not been much of a runner, but I did join a Danskin training group and had the best 12 weeks of training and comradeship.  Those twelve weeks had a lot to do with my finishing 30 minutes faster than I had expected.  I highly recommend the training from the Danskin Women's Triathlon Series or the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society's Team In Training.  They are well prepared to get the first timer ready for her/his first event.  In the meantime, you may want to pick "Triathlons for Women" by Sally Edwards.  It not only give training techniques and regimens, but it will also provide answers to questions about what to eat and when while training and on race day and it will walk you  through and prepare you for the chaos of the transition area.  Sally Edwards will also inspire you!  Best of luck!

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