Skip navigation
Community: Exchange advice in the forums and read running commentary Resources: Personal running log, calculators, links and other tools for runners News: Running news from around the world Training: Articles and advice about fitness, race training and injury prevention Races/Results: Find upcoming races and past results Home: The Cool Running homepage
Cool Running homepage  Search Cool Running Community

4199 Views 5 Replies Latest reply: Oct 31, 2008 1:59 PM by JoAnn Last Chance
triandtriagain Rookie 6 posts since
Jul 30, 2007
Currently Being Moderated

Jan 8, 2008 8:59 PM

Taking the training indoors

Hi, I've recently transitioned to the treadmill for the winter months and I'm concerned about getting the same quality of workout. The treadmill is fun and a nice change, but I've noticed my stride, speed, breathing and pretty much everything else has changed since moving indoors. Does anyone have any advice, or better yet, any cold, hard math for getting the same workout on the treadmill that I would from the roads?

  • runlowryrun Rookie 1 posts since
    Jan 8, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Jan 8, 2008 9:04 PM (in response to triandtriagain)
    Re: Taking the training indoors

    Keep in mind as you run on the treadmill that the incline needs to be set at least 1 because 0 setting is almost like running down hill. Your speed on a treadmill is also different from running outside. 9 minute pace on a treadmill would be about the same as a 9.45 pace outside.

  • astickinmud Rookie 1 posts since
    Jan 8, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. Jan 8, 2008 9:07 PM (in response to triandtriagain)
    Re: Taking the training indoors

    I prefer running outside to a treadmill. But, what I DO like about the treadmill is you can set a pace and keep it. And for races, you're less likely to slow down the second half. I like to slowly creep up mph through my workout which is great for that. Even 1 mph faster than your starting speed over a course of your workout makes a differance.

  • JoAnn Last Chance Rookie 4 posts since
    Oct 30, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Oct 30, 2008 11:25 PM (in response to runlowryrun)
    Re: Taking the training indoors

     

    Hi, how do I know what % my TM is set at?  I have an old model with manual feet in the back, so if I want to change the incline it's a matter of selecting a different hole, but I have no clue what % the incline is.  I set it once to almost perfectly level (I used my hubby's carpenter level) and although running on it was easier & faster, after the 1st mile I started to feel pain in my knee and tops of my chins....almost like I was running downhill, but it was definately NOT a decline.  I changed it back to where it was before.  I put a level on it and the rear end was about 2" lower than the front.

     

     

    Also in the past I have run 5K's on the road mostly flat with some hills, and finished within 33-34 minutes (I'm a  return newbie with an old knee injury) and no matter how long I train I can't get myself under 42 minutes in 3 miles on my TM.  Is it just easier to run on the road with longer strides than on a TM?  Or do you think my ancient TM digital calculations is off? 

     

     

    I'll be running a 5K this Sunday, so only a few more days & I will see if it's me or the treadmill.  I am pushing 50 but I feel younger and in better shape than I was at 45 so what gives?  Help!

     

     

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,422 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. Oct 31, 2008 6:42 AM (in response to JoAnn Last Chance)
    Re: Taking the training indoors

    Trinewbies.com has a discussion of treadmill running here: http://www.trinewbies.com/tno_running/tno_runarticle_06.asp

     

     

     

     

     

    JoAnn, figuring your treadmill belt is about 50" long, and the back is 2" lower than the front works out to a 4% incline, which is fairly steep. So 42 minutes for 3 miles might be expected, because you're running uphill. 1% is considered equivalent to a flat road outdoors. The link above has another link which is supposed to take you to an "effort-based" chart for treadmill running. But the link didn't work when I was there. Here's another link to the same chart: http://www.teambeast.org/training/treadmilleffort.doc

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Len

     

     

     

     

     

     

    PS: To figure the incline in percent, , measure how much lower the back is than the front, multiply by 100 and divide by the length of the belt. So 2" times 100 equals 200, divided by 50 equals 4%.





    Len

  • JoAnn Last Chance Rookie 4 posts since
    Oct 30, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. Oct 31, 2008 1:59 PM (in response to lenzlaw)
    Re: Taking the training indoors

     

    Thanks Len.  That link did not work for me either...but your calculations helped me a lot.  Good to know just because I am getting older doens't mean I am getting slower.  Yay!  My TM belt is 45" long, so it turns out I have been running at a 4.4% incline.  I never minded slight uphill, grades (harder yet no injury)  it's the down hills that jack up my knees and cause me shin problems.  Probably why set at almost level, my knee started hurting.  I guess just another reason I stay indoors even during the summer.  I guess any running in is better than no running at all.

     

     

    Got any suggestions on how to get down the hills in a race without having to walk ?  Is there a type of footing or style to get downward without hurting my sensitive knees, like how to land?  Do I stay on my toes or ball of my feet, use my hole foot or towards the back of my heels?

     

     

    Thanks any suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

     

     

    JoAnn

     

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...