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4170 Views 4 Replies Latest reply: May 6, 2009 1:06 PM by High Performance Fitness RSS
BeckyBilo Amateur 8 posts since
Feb 25, 2009
Currently Being Moderated

Mar 31, 2009 2:13 PM

Running Pains

 

I was wondering if anyone could help me.  I am training for my first race a 5k. I know thats not a big deal to a lot of people but this is a pretty big deal for me because I haven't run long distances (i.e. more than a mile) really ever. So I have been doing interval training and I am now running 10 minutes walk 1 minute run 10 minutes walk 1 minute and then run the rest which is about 15 more minutes.  I feel great through almost the end of my run and then the insides of my calves kill me. When I stop running they hurt for about 30 minutes or so. Usually the next day (my day off) they are fine and then on my run day they hurt a little at the start and it sort of goes away or I can just deal with it.  My race is the 11th so I don't have a lot of time to take off, but if anyone has any suggestions I would greatly appreciate it.

 

 

  • Rnrchk Rookie 2 posts since
    Jan 1, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Apr 4, 2009 2:50 AM (in response to BeckyBilo)
    Re: Running Pains

    I am also new to running, well semi-new (8 mo).  I have found reading about the sport really helps me study how to prevent injury and train smart.  It could be a variety of reasons as to why you are having pains.  A good read, if you're into it, is "Running for Mortals" or "Marathoning for Mortals."  Good luck with your training and congrats on your successes so far!

  • clokoro Amateur 23 posts since
    Nov 16, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. Apr 6, 2009 10:40 PM (in response to BeckyBilo)
    Re: Running Pains

     

    Hi Becky

     

     

    It could be your shoes.  I experienced a lot of different pains when I started running, and things got much better when I got better shoes in the right size. 

     

     

    If there is a specialty sport shoe store in your area, you may want to head over there with your current shoes in hand (or on your feet).  They should be able to look at how you stand, walk, and run, then look at the wear patterns on your current pair of shoes.  After all that, they'll be able to say if your shoes are the issue and suggest some shoe models that will work better for you.

     

     

    Muscle tightness might also be an issue.  Are you stretching after you finish your run?  It may help.  I'm attaching a stretch card I got from a beginner running class I took.  The first two stretches might really help in the calf area.

     

     

    Hope this helps.  Good luck on your 5k!  It's a very big deal!

     

     

    Attachments:
  • DGonzales Rookie 1 posts since
    Apr 12, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Apr 12, 2009 8:31 PM (in response to BeckyBilo)
    Re: Running Pains

    i also have pains after i run. i've bought new shoes. i stretch about 15-20min. prior  but when i come to my cool down or the next day after my run. my lower back is killing me, even to where i can't bare to bend down and pick something off the floor. i've also looked into trying out arch supports .i've only tried them for a week but the pain is still there,HELP from Texas!!

  • High Performance Fitness Amateur 8 posts since
    Jan 11, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. May 6, 2009 1:06 PM (in response to BeckyBilo)
    Re: Running Pains

    Since the calves are just a part of the kinetic chain, they might just be a symptom of the problem.  Getting involved in a strength training program for runners may help reduce the amount of pain you feel.  Your pain may be a indication of a weakness somewhere in your legs, hips, or back.  There is also a chance that it is a problem that starts in your feet with weak arches and may require orthopedic inserts and/or a foot strengthening and flexibility program.  This would be a great time to talk to someone who can assess your strength, flexibility, and running efficiency.  See a professional.  Running should not be causing more pain outside the normal soreness and fatigue.  Typically if you continue to run with pain, it leads to more pain and suffering.

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