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1710 Views 9 Replies Latest reply: May 13, 2009 6:30 PM by lenzlaw RSS
MarathonDream Pro 288 posts since
Dec 14, 2007
Currently Being Moderated

May 11, 2009 11:20 AM

Running Shoe Questions

I'm a fairly experienced runner and I put about 40-60 miles a week on a pair of shoes. My shoe of choice is an Asics 2120-2140 and I usually stay within the "support" category when purchasing new shoes.

 

How many of you out there wear out the right back half of your sole faster than any other part of your shoe? I used to be able to get about 350-400 miles on a pair of shoes but these days I can see wear in as little as a 150-200. By the time I reach 300, the black is almost completely worn down on both sides and I have to purchase a new pair. I'm a running store dream .

 

 

Can I get some input on why this seems to be happening?





Training For: 50k Ultra Marathon (2nd)

  • Run Coach Robert Legend 782 posts since
    Jan 7, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. May 11, 2009 2:55 PM (in response to MarathonDream)
    Re: Running Shoe Questions

     

    Sounds like you are an over-pronator with a heel strike problem. Are you a large person? Try running barefoot or a least landing mid-foot.  

     

     

    350-400 miles for running shoes is pushing the limits. I retire my shoes to walking after 250. The soles may not be worn out, but the cushioning is gone.

     

     

     

     

     





    Robert Martin

    NFPT Certified Personal Trainer

    NFPT Endurance Specialist

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    http://www.hardcoretrainingsystems.com

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,373 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. May 11, 2009 6:45 PM (in response to MarathonDream)
    Re: Running Shoe Questions

     

    The other possibility is that you are overstriding, which also usually results in heavy heel strike. As HardCoreTrainer said, try landing more mid-foot. One way to move in that direction is to plant your foot as directly under your body as possible. When your foot is fully planted it should be directly under your center of gravity.

     

     

     

     

     

    Len

     

     





    Len

  • p.c314 Rookie 4 posts since
    May 5, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. May 12, 2009 7:59 AM (in response to MarathonDream)
    Re: Running Shoe Questions

    I run about 50-60 miles a week.  I have discovered that landing midfoot may save your shoe, however it's not a method to run faster.  Taking your heel all the way to your butt like you're trying to crush an egg and then coming down with the heel will save you energy and help you run faster.  I learned that from an athelete/running coach, and this method does work.  I also have been through quite a few shoes and have found no better shoe than Saucony.  I bought it at Big Five sorting goods.  Best wishes and happy trails.

  • Run Coach Robert Legend 782 posts since
    Jan 7, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. May 12, 2009 8:50 AM (in response to p.c314)
    Re: Running Shoe Questions

     

    While your coach is correct in stating that raising the heel is beneficial for speed, it is not the most efficient method over distance. Hence, the "ultra-runner shuffle".

     

     

    It is incorrect to say that heel striking is the most efficient method for speed. A simple study of bio mechanics demonstrates otherwise and it increases stress to joints, bones, and muscles from the ankle to the hips.

     

     

     

     

     





    Robert Martin

    NFPT Certified Personal Trainer

    NFPT Endurance Specialist

    RRCA Running Coach

    SPINNING Instructor

    GRAVITY Personal Training Instructor

    GRAVITY Group Instructor

    Power Plate Level II Instructor

    2010 & 2011 Team Aquaphor Sponsored Athlete

    Gatorade G Series PRO Lead Ambassador, San Diego

    http://www.hardcoretrainingsystems.com

  • p.c314 Rookie 4 posts since
    May 5, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. May 12, 2009 9:26 PM (in response to Run Coach Robert)
    Re: Running Shoe Questions

    What would be the proper mechanics for long distance running?  I have never run as far in short of time, 7 mi., without raising my heel to butt.  I have landed midfoot and have not made gains on distance and time.  I have also done some weight training on my legs, and have been in taekwondo for over 14 yrs., my legs are very in shape despite my fluxuating weight.  I am 5' 11" and weigh about 180 lbs..  Do I wide stride, raise the heel to butt, strike the ground with heel and roll through the ball of my foot, is there a difference in running uphill or downhill?  Please help.

  • strangerthanfitness Pro 120 posts since
    Dec 3, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    6. May 12, 2009 9:32 PM (in response to p.c314)
    Re: Running Shoe Questions

    You are over thinking it...you need to work on being more fit.  There is no secret to running longer distances, you need to add distance at a rate of around 10% per week.  That coupled with weight training and a healthy lifestyle will increase your distance not where you land on your foot during your stride.  Pro athletes all land on different parts of there foot when running long distances, its more a matter of the way your body is built than training.  That being said, as far as I understand it, you can train a small amount to land more mid to fore foot and that will make you more efficient.  It is widely accepted that forefoot running is the most efficient, but not everyone is born with that advantage.

  • Run Coach Robert Legend 782 posts since
    Jan 7, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. May 12, 2009 9:45 PM (in response to p.c314)
    Re: Running Shoe Questions

    I think the book Pogrammed To Run by Thomas S. Miller will explain it better than I could. It should be available at your local library. I have provided a link so that you can read an overview of it.

     

    http://www.humankinetics.com/products/showproduct.cfm?isbn=9780736037495





    Robert Martin

    NFPT Certified Personal Trainer

    NFPT Endurance Specialist

    RRCA Running Coach

    SPINNING Instructor

    GRAVITY Personal Training Instructor

    GRAVITY Group Instructor

    Power Plate Level II Instructor

    2010 & 2011 Team Aquaphor Sponsored Athlete

    Gatorade G Series PRO Lead Ambassador, San Diego

    http://www.hardcoretrainingsystems.com

  • Alie Martine Rookie 3 posts since
    May 10, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    8. May 13, 2009 2:03 PM (in response to MarathonDream)
    Re: Running Shoe Questions

     

    One thing that has been recomended to me is running barefoot, as landing heavily on your heels is actually very bad for your joints. My boyfriend just got a pair of vibram fivefingers, which he loves and has been slowly breaking in. They're basically just a rubber sole with no support, so it feels like running barefoot with out the worry of tearing up your feet. We also white water kayak, so they're being used as river shoes as well.

     

     

    Some running stores will do gait analysis, both to point out issues you're having and to determine what type of shoes would work best for you. If you do start running barefoot or in something like five fingers, do make sure to transition slowly, since the muscles in our feet have to develop properly!

     

     

     

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,373 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    9. May 13, 2009 6:30 PM (in response to Alie Martine)
    Re: Running Shoe Questions

     

    Heel striking, per se, is not necessarily bad. Heavy heel striking may be because it usually results from overstriding, which can cause unnecessary stress on the legs. In the same vein, forefoot striking is supposed by some to be most efficient, but I wouldn't say it is widely accepted. And it certainly hasn't been demonstrated. Forefoot striking appears to cause the same overall load on the legs but changes which muscles and joints that absorb more of the load. The problem is there is not much hard research, but a lot of theoretical discussion. There is a lot of discussion of these issues on The Science of Sport website. (http://www.sportsscientists.com/2008/01/featured-series-on-science-of-sport.html).

     

     

     

     

     

    In one 2004 study of 283 elite runners at a half-marathon, 75% were heel-strikers, 24% midfoot-stikers, and only 4 were forefoot strikers. Browse the articles at The Science of Sport if you get the chance. You will find discussions of all points of view, and support for most of them too.

     

     

     

     

     

    Len

     

     





    Len

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