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3147 Views 5 Replies Latest reply: May 16, 2009 8:45 PM by NNELGHTIMS RSS
pgiguer Rookie 1 posts since
Jul 9, 2007
Currently Being Moderated

May 19, 2005 10:23 AM

Learning to swim: Floating

I'm trying to help a tri-Triathalon friend with his swimming problems. He has consulted innumerable swim instructors and swim coaches, trained his brains out, yet he still DNF'd the swimming a full Ironman.

 

I met him in the pool.  He cannot float. On his Back or his front he sinks straight to the bottom of the pool each time he tries to float.

 

I announced that this was his problem. Period. Stop swimming (oddly his stroke/form is strong)and suggested he start from the begining and learn how to swim".

 

Am I correct or just wrong. Do you need to float properly to successfully swim?

  • jkenny5150 Legend 252 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. May 20, 2005 8:14 AM (in response to pgiguer)
    Re: Learning to swim: Floating

    Absolutely not.  I can't float to save my life, and I've swum ten times the distance of the ironman swim in one shot.  Your friend may just have a low percentage of body fat or poor body position.  I think your friend just needs a good coach.

  • SwimminKathy Amateur 9 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. May 21, 2005 1:15 PM (in response to pgiguer)
    Re: Learning to swim: Floating

    I do agree with jkenny on the idea of body fat percentage and how it affects a person while he or she is floating. However, I also feel that if you don't know how to keep your body afloat (no matter how muscular) than you are working too hard in the water while you swim.  I have taught plenty of people, mainly older men, how to use their hands slightly by sculling or doing other small modifications so that they can keep their body afloat.  Once a person gets the feel of how his or her body feels when they are floating, swimming comes a lot easier.  If you have any questions please feel free to contact me.

  • jkenny5150 Legend 252 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. May 23, 2005 9:50 AM (in response to pgiguer)
    Re: Learning to swim: Floating

    Are we talking about floating or sculling?  Not everyone can float, but if you're allowed to use your hands, then it should be a piece of cake.

  • virtualswim Rookie 3 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. Feb 11, 2007 7:00 AM (in response to pgiguer)
    Re: Learning to swim: Floating

    I've coached buoyancy challenged triathletes - the swimmer need to accept their natural aquatic signature in the water and move from there. A patient - now read carefully - TEACHER/coach is a good thing ot have to provide feedback, instruction and confidence during the learning phase

  • NNELGHTIMS Rookie 1 posts since
    May 5, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. May 16, 2009 8:45 PM (in response to pgiguer)
    Re: Learning to swim: Floating

    If they are not able to float, then they don't have enough air in their lungs. All they have to do is take a big enough breath, hold it long enough and they will float. Try it. Let me know if this helped.    :  )

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