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29387 Views 60 Replies Latest reply: Jul 24, 2012 8:36 PM by 300poundsandrunning RSS Go to original post 1 2 3 4 5 Previous Next
  • Noskillzrunning Pro 104 posts since
    Mar 2, 2009

     

    I love being a "big guy"  by runner standards (6'2" 210lbs) and blowing past people half my size. i started 18 months ago weighing 340lbs. I'm down to 8mm on 5K but love  endurace running (17 miles today). I do think most "smaller" runners dismiss us but I've gotten used to.

     

     

    Keep it up ya'll!

     

    Chris

     

     

     

     

     





    My sport is your sport's punishment

  • Albyno-Rhyno Amateur 32 posts since
    Aug 25, 2008

    Havto agree with the other members who've suggested that it's mostly mental.  There is no universal "runner" image for the average citizen

    (unless you're talking about world-class olympians, but that's a compeltely different fitness level). 

     

    For every race (a hundred to a thousand+), the entire weight/height/age gamet is represented and there are no existing opinions about anyone.  What does amaze me is the

    people who think they're fast and line up in front, only to be passed

    within the first 100-yds.  I usually give kudos to the above 70 runners as that demonstrates how many running years I have remaining. 

     

     

     

     

     

    What people need to achieve is the weight in which they feel good.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    BTW, I'm 6-4, 210 and run sub-20 5k's (@ 4500'), so keep up the effort.

  • wovercast Rookie 3 posts since
    May 1, 2009

    I agree Noskillz. I take pride in passing those half my size. I was 340 lbs as well...in fact that was about 18 months ago (weird). I am down to 235, but I am also 6' 5". Last weekend I ran a 10k at 8:30/mile. My 5k pace is usually 7:45 or faster. I always have people commenting after the race that I was much faster than expected haha. It's all in good fun, and I have personally never been disrespected by fellow racers.

  • ee2008 Amateur 12 posts since
    Mar 29, 2008

    Morning all!  I stumbled upon this thread while looking for info for DH, a clydesdale.  He's a mtn. biker but also does running races.  He wouldn't consider himself a runner - in all our time together, I think he's run with me twice.  Anyway, I've been thinking about this thread for a bit and felt compelled to chime in.  I think we all have insecurities and those often translate into a chip on our shoulders.  I'm a "skinny" runner and I can honestly and truthfully say that I have never looked at someone and wondered why they were running, nor have I been "humbled" by someone passing me just because they were heavier than me.  I talked to a woman before a 10k once, she was walking it, I was running (BTW, I didn't ask if she was walking, she told me) and I thought that was awesome!  In a way, it takes much more mental energy to walk a 10k than running because it takes so much more time.  I have a chip on my shoulder about being a younger parent - I have a 9-year old son and am 31 but look even younger than that.  I limit my activities at his school because I feel like other parents look at me differently for being young.  What kind of garbage is that?  The truth of the matter is that they probably see me the same way I see heavier runners - not at all.  I have to remember that I'm not that important and people aren't always looking at me thinking negative thoughts.  When I'm lining up for a race, I'm more interested in people's ages than their weight - who is in my age group.  I think it's a shame that we allow these things to influence us, whether in running or in our NRR lives.  Why can't we just support each other instead of using each other?

  • sfchildress Rookie 4 posts since
    Sep 29, 2009
    I completely understand, it's a little crazy. I have finished 6 5K and 2 half-marathons and have passed tons of skinny men and women who went balls to the walls and the beginning. I am not a fast runner, but i can out distance a lot of people. Women do look at you like, hmm, really? I had a guy come up to me last weekend after the half and he was tall and thin and he said, hey, good finish. In my mind i was thinking hell yeah! You go girl and don't let anyone make you feel like you are any less of a runner because we are "curvy". Just run!
  • plaidscottie Rookie 1 posts since
    Oct 26, 2009

    I'm 5'7" and weigh 210 and I outran all the people in my office that were doing the 5K Susan Komen Race for the Cure. And both of them are petite women. I think they were in shock when they found out I paced 11 min miles and medaled (probably closer to 10 min miles because it took 4-5 minutes before I was able to run at the start). I think I also dropped a lot of jaws when I SPRINTED the last .10 mile. My husband said he would buy this expensive All-Clad pan I've had my eye on if I finished under 35 minutes, and when I got near the finish line, the clock said 34:20 and I HAULED it into the finish line so I could make it under 35 min. 34:50 baby!!!

     

    Goes to show that being skinny doesn't mean you're healthy, and that determination goes a long way! RUN FATGIRL RUN!

  • CDR Spencer Moseley Pro 167 posts since
    Mar 20, 2008

    They do.  But I usually give them a nice smirk as I pass them...

  • gatorman10 Legend 242 posts since
    Apr 23, 2003

    Oh I get that all the time.  Usually it is an "as-if" look from someone at the start..  I'm no speed demon (22:38 5k, 48:??, 10k, 78:?? 15k, 1:44 HM) but I am faster than a lot of those people that give me cross looks.  I love to hang around the finish and tell them what a nice race they ran!  I'm so bad.  Most people are not like that...  Don't sweat it!

  • ChubbyRunrGrl Amateur 31 posts since
    Nov 4, 2009

    I used to feel like people looked at me differently, but that comes with low self-esteem.

    In the end, it's a personal race and each person has to get through the miles on their own.

     

    I'm so fortunate to have a great running community and everyone encourages each other and when they ask me

    what my next event will be, they are excited and don't treat me any differently than anyone else.

     

    The big problems are finding great tech gear for larger size females, which fortunately I've found basically

    everything I need from New Balance between XL and XXL.

     

    Now that I've completed a few races, I feel much more confident and try not to look at everyone else at a race, but focus on my

    own goal. Most thinner runners that I come across are excited to share their love of running and their experience to anyone.





    Runner since 2009.

    I used to run to get faster, but got tired of pushing it, panting and feeling disappointed.

    Now I run to relax and enjoy, around a 12:30 - 13:00 average pace.

    Starting to get into trail running - way slower, but highly enjoyable.

    Try to run 15-20mi per week and spin 4-7 times per week.

    Best race paces:

    1 mile - 10:12

    5K - 11:34

    4mi - 11:32

    10K - 11:15

    Half Marathon - 13:20

    I wear New Balance running gear (they have many choices in XXL, size 18).

    I wear Moving Comfort heavy duty bras.

    I wear New Balance 769/760/860 for stability and cushion.

    I wear New Balance 904 for trails.

  • Marykb Legend 1,347 posts since
    Jan 16, 2008

    Reminds me of a conversation I had with a co worker several years ago.  She was about 20 and thin.  I was twice her age and 30 lbs heavier.  I was talking about running and she gave me an appraising look and commented, "You don't look like a runner.  I just picture a runner as looking, you know, different..." She was trying to tell me that since I wasn't thin and sinewy I didn't fit the runner image.  Funny thing, though, this girl was thin and young but a smoker and never exercised.  I guarantee I could have whooped her skinny *** running any day!

     

    I pass my share of skinnier and younger runners.  Fast forward a few years to a race I ran recently with another co-worker.  I am five years older and 30 lbs heavier than she is but beat her by a couple of minutes in a 5K.  I'm not fast, and more runners are usually ahead of me than behind me, but I really don't care what any of them think!





  • Leadville Fan Pro 176 posts since
    Oct 8, 2009

    I run for ME, and no one else. It doesn't matter to me where I come in the pack, as long as I don't come in last .

     

    I really am disheartened by the comments of people who are considering no longer running or competing because of comments. A friend of mine is 6 feet, is a size 18, and has legs of almost solid muscle.  She said she has several coworkers and others make comments about how she can't possibly run.  A suggestion I had was , "just because I'm overweight, doesn't mean I'm not healthy".  There's a fairly new term going around called "skinny fat". It's about those who are slender and in the right government weight range, but couldn't do anything  even moderately suggestive of healthy exercise.

     

    I have seen the glances from people looking at me (size 12) running. Usually it's those "cute" women in the most recent fashions running. Do I really need to take someone seriously who has to run in the latest fashions? NO.   I don't run fast, I don't run smoothly, but I run for me.





    adult running life commenced: March 2009

    2012 Rock n Roll USA Marathon 5:28:53 unseasonably hot day, full sunshine, sunburned and dehydrated during race

    Omaha Maraton 5:17: __ yeah, new PR! Too bad the brain got in the way and slowed me down! ---recycled glass finisher medals.

    2011:

    April Fools 5K 32:13.7 age division: 28/71

    7th half: Kansas City Hospital Hill 1/2--this thing is tough, but the heat/humidity were tougher: 2:45:43

    8th half: Park 2 Park 1/2-New PR 2:21 and change

    St. Louis FULL Marathon (my first!!!) Hilly, hilly, course full of turns 5:24

    Sullivan Bros. Veterans' 5K 30:10 New 5K PR

    2010:

    4th half (5/1/10) --ran injured, DUMB move.

    Sullivan Bros. Veteran's 5K/10K (11/2010) 1:07:17.7

    6th half: Vegas half (12/2010) New PR! woot woot. 02:27:58

    2009

    St. Patricks 8K (Wash. D.C.) (3/2009)

    1st half 3:04 (5/2009)

    10K 1:17 (10/31/09) HOT, humid, Kaua'i

    3rd half: Vegas 1/2 (2:34:48) (12/2009)

    I will live my life; life lived in fear is not living. ~~me

  • deleteseptember201218act Expert 44 posts since
    Feb 22, 2010

    Leadville Fan wrote:

     

    I run for ME, and no one else. It doesn't matter to me where I come in the pack, as long as I don't come in last .

     

    I really am disheartened by the comments of people who are considering no longer running or competing because of comments. A friend of mine is 6 feet, is a size 18, and has legs of almost solid muscle.  She said she has several coworkers and others make comments about how she can't possibly run.  A suggestion I had was , "just because I'm overweight, doesn't mean I'm not healthy".  There's a fairly new term going around called "skinny fat". It's about those who are slender and in the right government weight range, but couldn't do anything  even moderately suggestive of healthy exercise.

     

    I have seen the glances from people looking at me (size 12) running. Usually it's those "cute" women in the most recent fashions running. Do I really need to take someone seriously who has to run in the latest fashions? NO.   I don't run fast, I don't run smoothly, but I run for me.

     

    Couldn't have said it better myself.





    Completed Events...

    Raincross Run 2010 - 5K - February 20th - 59:16 (I know, slow, but I did it)

    Walk for Kids by 100 Mile Club - 5K - March 13th - 59:00

    March of Dimes - March for Babies 4.5 miles - April 24th

    Graduated the C25K program - May 3rd

    Cool Runnings 5K Beginner program - W3D2

  • RunStephRunCO Amateur 29 posts since
    Mar 11, 2010
    I find the "I don't look like a  typical runner" comments interesting.  People that think those things  about you most likely have never even been to see a race.  There are ALL  shapes and sizes of RUNNERS.  I guess I "don't look like a typical  runner," either.  But I don't care.  I RUN.  I used to be running 10m  miles until I injured my foot (wrong shoes).  I'm now around 11m miles, but I'll  get my speed back.  Even if I don't - who cares.  I'm 10 lbs overweight  with legs that could be thinner - but my body does incredible things out  on that running path while a good deal of people are sitting home in  their recliners.  I may wish my legs could look different, but you know  what?  I wouldn't trade them for the world - THEY RUN!!  All that  matters is what's going on in your own brain...not other people's.  What  other people think about you is none of your business. 




    5/8/10 Grand Valley Half Marathon 2:31:31 - first race...just getting started!

  • SunnyDiva Rookie 1 posts since
    Apr 1, 2010

    Hey Nikki

     

    Don't feel disheartened. Each time you do your thing, someone who had no idea a bigger girl could run is learning that anyone who practices and trains properly can do it.

     

    I'm a size 12 (but used to be morbidly obese) and was self conscious the first few times I went to races. I assumed I would look and feel like I didn't belong there. What I found instead were people who were often wanting to strike up pleasant conversations. I realized that I was projecting my own negative self-views onto perfect strangers. I used to feel self-conscious about my size, so I assumed they would look me up and down and wonder "what's she doing here?" The reality is that they don't care, neither should I, and they probably have better things to do than watch me and judge me anyway!

     

    I find that people who love to run are supportive of others who love to run. It's not the other runners who don't accept you. It might be annoying that people assume you're going to walk, but I seriously doubt that the comments or questions that you get are maliciously intended, so let them roll off your back without a second thought. And don't let it affect your self-esteem or your running goals. People go to races for themselves, for a cause or for loved ones--they're not there to judge you.

     

    Do your thing!!

  • Lea20871 Rookie 1 posts since
    Oct 4, 2009

    This is the first time I have ever posted here, but I felt the need to respond.  I am currently a "big" girl at 5 ft 4 in. and 235 lbs.  I have been bigger but I have also been smaller.  I started running a couple months ago using the C25K program.  I am currently on week 4 day 2, which I will have to repeat before moving on.  For me it isn't about what size I am, or what I am wearing or what others think.  To put it bluntly, It is none of my business what other people think.  Their thoughts can't make me bigger, can't make me smaller, can't make me run faster or slower.  I can CHOOSE to let MY perception of what I assume they are thinking to make me FEEL smaller.  Also those that seem to get offended by someone saying you can do it, or you go girl, or whatever is wrong.  Those people that say those things are just being encouraging to you.  they are showing that they believe in you.  If I know I can do it, I just smile and think, yep thanks, I know I can do it too!  They are giving you support and showing you they care!   Those that make derogatory comments are to be ignored.  Maybe we do get people looking at us like we can't do it.  but hold your head high and DO IT!  No one can make us feel anything unless we choose to allow it.  I am registering for my first 5k at the end of september.  I seriously have at least 15 friends that will be running the same race.  I know that some of them will finish way sooner than I will and in fact I expect that MOST of them will finish before me.  I also expect that the majority of them will wait for me at the finish line and cheer me on.  When I decided to take up running I had a VERY thin beautiful "barbie"  friend who is the stereotypical runner tell me that I could do it.  She tells me that she will encourage me as much as I need.  She checks on me a couple times a week and she was bragging me up to her husband who is a triathlete and HE has been encouraging me too.  BTW next goal is a sprint triathlon for me!  true runners come in all shapes and sizes.  It isn't how fit a person LOOKS it is about how fit they ARE on the inside.  I didn't take up running to lose weight in fact I couldn't take up running to lose weight.  I have so much to lose that I get discouraged and quit because it wouldn't come off fast enough.  I ended up with high blood pressure and was put on medication.  I HATE taking medicine.  I am 37 and have 3 young children.  I want to be there for them and do all the active fun things with them.  they are my motivation.  I want them to be proud of me and see that it doesn't matter that I am overweight, I can do it.  My health is also my motivation.  I want to be HEALTHY!  If the weight loss comes, which it is just VERY slowly, then that is a huge benefit.  What would you rather have parked in your garage, a beautiful corvette that doesn't run or a chevy truck that runs just fine?

     

    Concentrate on what your motivations are, don't worry about what others think because you truly don't know.  When someone that is larger asks if you are a walker, hold your head high smile and say, "NOPE, I have been training!  I am running this race!"  You never know, your words might be the motivation that they need to be able to do it too! 

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