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2362 Views 4 Replies Latest reply: Jan 23, 2010 6:00 AM by Tikijenn
Tikijenn Amateur 15 posts since
Jun 6, 2009
Currently Being Moderated

Jan 16, 2010 10:08 AM

Knee pain

I was trail running about a month ago and felt a slight ache after jumping over a stump.  It didn't bother me too bad so I finished about half a mile later.  The next day as I was getting out of my car the cold air hit me and OWW the pain set in!!  I could hardly walk.  It went away once I got warmed up but I chose not to run for a couple of weeks just to give it some time to heal.  It has a been a month and I haven't had any problems out of it so I decided to try the treadmill for my first run since then.  It started aching within 7 minutes so I stopped.  What am I going to do about my training?  My plan was to start my training this month and it looks like I'll be delayed and don't know how long it will be.  I think it may be an IT Band injury and I know those can be long recoveries.  What can I do to help speed recovery?  I've been doing hip stretches daily and that may be why I don't feel any pain but I don't want to make matters worse.  I plan to do an indoor mini triathlon 2/27.  That's not long from now.  Help!





Jennifer Campbell

ThomastonTriathletes.ning.com

    

  • JamesJohnsonLMT Legend 1,167 posts since
    Aug 23, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Jan 17, 2010 2:38 AM (in response to Tikijenn)
    Re: Knee pain

    ITB is usually more of an overuse issue. In your case, I am inclined to suspect a strain to one of your muscles after jumping that stump.

     

    Muscles react to cold, because one of their main jobs is heating your body by burning glycogen (why we shiver). The lateral quad (Vastus Lateralis) is under the ITB, and would be the first muscle exposed to the air when you get out of your car. It would also act as a shock absorber during jumping and running.

     

    Sitting in a chair, reach over the affected thigh with your fingers, just above the knee (while sitting, just toward the hip) on the lateral part of your quad, and reach under the ITB and quad (by curling your fingertips under it) and pull it upward. See if you find sensitivity under there. Sometimes after trail running, I have to rub that area at stop lights on my way home. That muscle is famous for getting loaded with painful knots that are noticeable during exercise. It's hard to get to most of it because of the hard, flat ITB on top.

     

    The hip stretches are good, although it is hard to stretch them much on a normal person. Check the hip stabilizer muscles in the upper glutes and forward on the hip (TFL) which tension the ITB and sustain a lot of impact when one leg strikes the ground.

     

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muscles_of_the_hip

  • JamesJohnsonLMT Legend 1,167 posts since
    Aug 23, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Jan 22, 2010 8:33 PM (in response to Tikijenn)
    Re: Knee pain

    My bout with ITB lasted a couple months. My method of pain control was various forms of magnesium and kinesio tape. Mag is an all-purpose nutrient that relaxes muscles when applied topically or used orally. It is mildly laxative, though. The tape was shaped and secured to lift the kneecap slightly and counteract the pull of gravity on the area. I cut my mileage some but made all my long runs - so far, 4 of marathon distance or longer. Everything seems to be back to normal now, about 3 months out from onset.

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