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13848 Views 26 Replies Latest reply: Feb 1, 2010 6:10 PM by hkay RSS Go to original post 1 2 Previous Next
  • KellyinNJ Amateur 19 posts since
    Jul 31, 2009

    Great advice from everyone on here.  Nothing to add except I need to correct the one post regarding muscle weighs more than fat.  Let me ask a question: what weighs more 1lb of fat or 1lb of muscle?  Answer, they both weigh the same, 1lb.  The difference is muscle is more dense and takes up less space in our bodies.  So we want more muscle in our bodies than we want fat.





    7/18/09 - Packanack Lake 5K - 37:53

    9/26/09 - Kinnelon Cares 5K - 32:58

    11/7/09 - Beaverbrook 5K - 30:00

    11/26/09 - Ashenfelter 8K Classic - 50:35

                  

  • AnTrelle Amateur 13 posts since
    Jun 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    16. Jan 6, 2010 7:41 AM (in response to cyndi t)
    Re: how much weight can one lose from running?

    I think yours is one of the best responses I read to this question!

     

    My initial response after reading the original post was to simple reply 'not much' because of that "I'll diet somewhat' comment at the end of the post. I'm not sure why people think that all it is going to take is a few 5k runs and the weight will just magically fall off. If that were the case there wouldn't be Clydesdale/Athena categories in races.

     

    Thank you SO much for pointing out that it takes a complete mind/body change if you want to lose weight!





    http://www.1stplacesports.com/tri2btuff.jpg

    In 2009 I Completed 3 Half Marathons in 3 Months!

    10/3/09 Marine Corps Half 3:12:26

    11/26/09 Outback Distance Classic 3:09:50

    12/20/09 Jacksonville Bank Half 2:56:21

  • SuperGsMomCan Rookie 11 posts since
    Oct 21, 2008

    I have to say that doing the couch to 5K last year I managed to lose about 20 lbs. And another 10 lbs after from continuing my 3-4 mile runs. I felt better and was probably more active in other areas of my life as well, but that program is what got me started. I did make very sensible food choices- really cut out most of the junk food, mindless snacking, and controlled my portion sizes. And added lots of veggies, lean protien to my diet, etc etc. Yes I was hungry in the beginning, and it took will power and an accountability buddy to get me through that part. Was it easy? Not at first, but it got better. I loosened the reigns to make changes I can live with. But be careful. My holiday food adventure and lack of exercise proves just how fast 12 of those pounds can pack back on. I'm back on to the C25K program and watching my food like a hawk again. Everyone's body is different, but I firmly believe that you have to SWEAT HARD to have good results. I'm sure I could have lost more if I was more consistent with my food, but I wanted to make sensible changes to my eating that I could live with- which is what probably kept my 12 lbs from turning into 30. It's not dieting- because that's temporary. It's really a change in your way of living, a change in your relationship with food. They're not easy changes at first, and sometimes life throws in some stumbling blocks, but getting started is the biggest obstacle. Jump in with both feet and you'll see the results you are looking for. And the advice of not setting a goal weight yet is right on. You may find that you are perfectly comfortable at a higher weight than that little chart is telling you to be.

    So the answer is 30lbs if you change your eating too 40+ lbs if you keep up with it and keep pushing yourself when the program ends. But it's at a rate of 1/2 to 1lb a week, 1 1/2 lbs on a killer week, maybe more on the first week- since your body is in shock!

     

    PS.The year before I burned out of the C25K program and made no changes to my eating- probably dropped 4lbs over a few months of inconsistent training and a half hearted attempt at making real changes.

  • This IS my race pace Pro 103 posts since
    Oct 19, 2007

    You got a lot of good input from a lot of smart people so I won't beat a dead horse and possibly send you into "analysis paralysis".    What I WILL do, however, is comment on your plateau.  I think everyone at some point and to some extent experiences the plateaus and they are SO frustrating for multiple obvious reasons.  My last physical I asked my doc what causes plateaus and she basically said this:

     

    Your body adjusts its capabilities to its requirements.  If you're sedentary your muscle mass and bone density decreases, but if you become more active they both increase.  It constantly self-calibrates so believe it or not regardless of our fitness level and activities, if we are in a routine, everyone puts themselves through an almost common level of effort compared to everyone else if their routines are constant and do not vary widely.

     

    When you change your diet and create a "caloric deficit" (fancy doc word) without decreasing your physical activity your body will continue to burn the calories at a somewhat higher rate UNTIL it gets to a point where it says, "Woah! Wait a minute!  I need these fat stores to survive!  If I keep going like this bad things will happen" so it decreases the metabolism.  Eventually it gets to the point where it says, "OK, no more of this foolishness.  I'm going to increase my caloric retention to maintain my weight because this is bad" and no matter what the caloric deficit is, the body holds onto more than it did before because it is now in survival mode. Before where a person could lose 2 or even 3 lbs a week, now they don't budge for a month.

     

    Ta-da! Plateau.

     

    NOW, these plateaus can last for a couple days to a couple of weeks depending upon the person.  This is where the doc says the vast majority of the people make their fatal mistake and either assume they have reached their loss potential or just give up.  I was told to keep doing what I was doing with the caloric deficit and exercise faithfully through the plateaus because eventually the body figures out that it can indeed live at the lower weight it is now at and it will NOT die, so it begins to release more and we start losing again.  Something very important to remember here is that this is a CYCLE, not a one-time thing so we will possibly experience multiple plateaus.  If you go onto one of the many good free food diary websites and start plotting your weekly weight you will see in your graph a pattern and most likely even be able to anticipate a plateau before it comes.

     

    In any event, don't let the plateaus get you down.  Just keep doing what you're doing, keep the faith and know that eventually you'll get through it and if you remain constant with your intake and exercise you'll be on the downslope again.  One more thing before I sign out:  the decrease in our bodies burning the calories is as I mentioned before part of a preservation process and our bodies do have a memory.  They remember that caloric deprivation so when we do increase our intake our bodies say, "Forget that!  I'm getting ready for the next time that happens and store MORE reserve energy (fat)".  And this is why when people lose weight on a "diet" and then go off of it, they gain more back than they lost.  So if a person starts at 150 and goes on a diet they could end up 153 at the end of it.

     

    Ok.  Done now.  Thanks!

  • Marykb Legend 1,347 posts since
    Jan 16, 2008

    What you said is all true.  I think a succinct way to put it is that the body strives for equilibrium.  When you begin to shake things up, so to speak (by cutting calories and/or beginning a new exercise activity) you will initially notice some drastic results.  But then the body invariably struggles to maintain the status quo.  Voila, the dreaded plateau!  I also suspect (though I have no scientific evidence to back this up) that the longer you have been overweight, the harder your body will fight to return to that weight.  In other words the few pounds you put on during the holidays, or during a pregnancy maybe, you can probably lose fairly easily and keep it off if you do it right away.  The 20 extra lbs you have been carrying for 10-15 years, on the other hand, is going to be pretty stubborn about coming back the minute you let your guard down.  Sucks, I know, but that seems to be the way it is. 





  • TomHorn Expert 42 posts since
    Dec 30, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    20. Jan 16, 2010 9:26 AM (in response to KellyinNJ)
    Re: how much weight can one lose from running?

    Kelly ... of course 1lb of anything weighs the same as 1lb of anything else. That question went out of style in elementary school, and clearly wasn't the point I was trying to make.

     

    In the context of being inside your body, the same volume of muscle absolutely weighs more than fat, which was the point I was trying to make. That's why I was pointing out to the OP not to get caught up in the actual weight number. While you can certainly use a number as a goal, ultimately what your body looks and feels like is far more important than the number on the scale.

  • Crista317 Amateur 39 posts since
    Apr 8, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    21. Jan 17, 2010 10:03 AM (in response to princesskimagure)
    Re: how much weight can one lose from running?

    I've been running for a semi long time...some seasons a lot of miles per week, some seasons not so many.... either way, Ive never lost a single pound through running alone. In fact, even when I was running quite far, quite often I managed to gain 20lbs in 2 yrs because I ate whatever and whenever I felt like it.  I've since lost those lbs by counting every calorie, weighing almost everything, cutting out almost all simple sugar, switch to whole grains, low fat foods, lots of veggies, fruits etc.... and I find it helps to write EVERYTHING down!! I know this works. I lost focus a little through the holidays and even though I'd been running 40+ miles a week, I still managed to not lose any through the holidays. So you really can't count on losing weight just through exercise, without changing your diet (or even "somewhat" changing your diet.) Never works for me anyway. Good luck!!!

  • This IS my race pace Pro 103 posts since
    Oct 19, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    22. Jan 18, 2010 4:54 AM (in response to Marykb)
    Re: how much weight can one lose from running?

    Oh, to be able to be as succinct as you, Marykb.  I am way too verbose.  Thanks for the backup though.  And I'm with you on the last part where you basically say the longer you carry it the harder it is to lose it.  I haven't been sub-200 for almost 20 yrs until this last fall when I finally touched 193 and now the REAL battle has begun.  It seems as if I sneeze I gain 3 lbs.  In the past it seemed as if my "natural equilibrium" would always balance out at about 220 no matter how much weight I gained or lost.  If I tried I could get from say, 240 to 220 but if I went under that to 210 for example, I would only be there for a couple of days before over the course of a week or so I would creep back to 220.

     

    I have absolutely no education or training in physiology so this is all based upon observation; but I fully support your theory.  My goal is to remain extremely diligent on a daily basis to stay as close to 190 as possible for at least a year in the hopes that my body will retrain itself to be comfortable w/ a mid-190s norm.  That would be a dream.

  • This IS my race pace Pro 103 posts since
    Oct 19, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    23. Jan 18, 2010 9:33 AM (in response to Crista317)
    Re: how much weight can one lose from running?

    Just re-read my last post and I have to say it may be construed the wrong way as if I was offended by marykb's comment on being more succinct and this is not the case.  I jabber too much so I truly do wish I could present things more succinctly as Ms. Mary did.  I wasn't offended and I apologize if I in turn did offend.

  • jcrule Amateur 228 posts since
    Jan 9, 2001
    Currently Being Moderated
    24. Jan 18, 2010 10:10 PM (in response to Marykb)
    Re: how much weight can one lose from running?

    I think this is an excellent list of replies!  Marykb is actually onto something.  Not proven, I don't think, but there is a theory among the scientist guru's that the body has a weight "set point".  Where they body tends to stay at a certain weight that it feels comfortable with...at the moment.  I have been in the mid-200's in weight for over 14 years, and then in the lower 200's the years before that...I'm only 35...you do the math.  My weight stayed at 260 for a long time.  Then when I got more into running and loosing weight, I'd go for a while and my body was doing that whole screaming, "What is going on here" and I would float back to 160...no more, no less.  The thing about a set point, totally validates the plateau theory that you just have to get through the period where your body is learning that it can survive at a lower weight.  This becomes your new "set point".  Mine is now 240.  In a special weight loss program I did they actually said you have to sustain a certain weight for a little while for your body to reset...aka get through the plateau.  After reading Chunky Monkey's reply it just all clicked for me.  And yes, I think it's much harder for somebody who's been overweight for a long time to loose it and loose it for good.  Physically doable, but the true challenge is mental to me.  I think the body is screaming, "I can't do this anymore," and my mind listens.

     

    So to the original poster, especially after being there done that, you have to keep up the running after you graduate the C25K.  All the run/walk intervals are just getting your body going, shaking the dust off.  Try to think about the real exercise starting after you graduate and decide what you want to do with your running.  Sure, you can loose some weight on the C25K.  I think sometimes folks forget how much we fat (let's face it we are) people burn way more calories to keep the heart rate up in the first few months.  I lost 30lbs in 3 months but I was also training on my off days for a triathlon, so swimming and cycling.  So you must get your heart rate up 5-6 days a week.  Seriously.  I wouldn't run that many days, NO WAY.

     

    Also think about what you want to run for.  If it's only to loose weight, I say try the C25K and see how you like it.  I could never run 3 miles in my life before I did the C25K, nor would I have wanted to...eww!  But now I really like running.  Who would have thought..not me.  Also, just let things take their own course.  Watch your calories, eat healthy, make better food choices, and get that heart rate up (I highly recommend a heart rate monitor).  Take it from me.  I'm 60lbs overweight right now.  I always used to get very discouraged after exercising for 3 months and looking at how much more I had to loose.  I always started to eat again (boy, oh boy do I like McDonalds breakfast menu...ugh).  This time around I'm trying my hardest to just relax and make it my lifestyle change.  No journaling, no obsessing over calories (once your familiar with what you should be eating which I am), AND just eating unprocessed foods, and making a commitment to running for a full year.  Not just 3 months like before.  I've got a plan to build my mileage base up and in the future run a 10K, then a 1/2 marathon.

     

    So, all my disconnected thoughts I leave you with this...you can do it I know you can.  Like other posters said, don't get caught up in the numbers.  Do what you know is good for your body, go SLOW with the running so you don't get injured, and have fun.  And on those days where your mind is telling you your body can't go on (as long as it's not a pain issue), tell it you can and that you will!

     

    Good luck!





    Jill

    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

    Upcoming Races:

       ~ Love'em or Leave'em Valentine's Day Dash 5K - 2/13/10 (32:50)

       ~ Some local St. Patty's Day 5K, gotta register for one - 3/13/10

       ~ Birch Bay Road Race 5K - 3/27/10

       ~ Need to register for a 10K before June

       ~ Seattle Rock 'n' Roll Half!!!!!  6/26/2010

       ~ Danskin Triathlon (Sprint) - 8/15/10

  • Marykb Legend 1,347 posts since
    Jan 16, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    25. Jan 19, 2010 5:41 AM (in response to Crista317)
    Re: how much weight can one lose from running?

    Crista317 wrote:

     

    I've been running for a semi long time...some seasons a lot of miles per week, some seasons not so many.... either way, Ive never lost a single pound through running alone. In fact, even when I was running quite far, quite often I managed to gain 20lbs in 2 yrs because I ate whatever and whenever I felt like it.  I've since lost those lbs by counting every calorie, weighing almost everything, cutting out almost all simple sugar, switch to whole grains, low fat foods, lots of veggies, fruits etc.... and I find it helps to write EVERYTHING down!! I know this works. I lost focus a little through the holidays and even though I'd been running 40+ miles a week, I still managed to not lose any through the holidays. So you really can't count on losing weight just through exercise, without changing your diet (or even "somewhat" changing your diet.) Never works for me anyway. Good luck!!!

    I can totally identify with this.  Whenever I have managed to drop pounds it is by weighing, measuring, counting and writing down everything I eat.  Yes, it WORKS!  No, it is not FUN!  I am still 30 lbs overweight and I know how I can lose it (see above!) but getting on board to do it just isn't for me right now....sigh.  For me, it seems like I have a certain amount of discipline at my disposal.  I use that discipline in many areas of my life, not the least of which is running regularly.  But then the willpower is all used up - none left over for that strict calorie control thing, ya know!

     

    (However, even though I don't restrict my calories, I do eat a healthy and sensible diet)





  • hkay Rookie 2 posts since
    May 22, 2008

    Everyone has pretty much summed it up.   try to cut 500 calories a day, forget about the numbers and focus on fitness, mix up cardio and weights and eat healthily!!  get rid of processed foods, pop and all of those food chemicals and sugars.   go healthy and natural and low cal/ low fat/ no or low sugar.

     

    good luck.   above all, have fun learning to change your lifestyle and the body will not only reflect the weightloss but the "new you"

     

    enjoy

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