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2854 Views 13 Replies Latest reply: Apr 30, 2010 5:47 PM by grayhairontherun RSS
Sh1Do Rookie 4 posts since
Mar 29, 2010
Currently Being Moderated

Apr 29, 2010 6:42 AM

Shin Pain

I ran my first 5k a few months ago and then stopped funning for a while because my shin hurt for a few weeks after. I started running again recently and my shins are starting to hurt again. I'm not sure if it's shin splints or if I got a stress fracture during the race... is there anyway to tell without going to a doctor or do I need to just give in and go?





"If you can dream it, you can do it"

  • run'nutah Amateur 24 posts since
    Mar 3, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Apr 29, 2010 6:47 AM (in response to Sh1Do)
    Re: Shin Pain

    I don't know how intense your pain is, but I am going through periodic shin splints.  Like me, you may need better shoes or need to stretch more.  If that doesn't work, you may want to get it checked out.





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    Salt Lake 1/2 Marathon 4/09

    Moab 1/2 Marathon 3/09

    Provo Canyon 1/2 Marathon 8/09

    Three 5K races 2005-2007

  • ActiveWatches Dave Legend 207 posts since
    Apr 13, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. Apr 29, 2010 12:14 PM (in response to run'nutah)
    Re: Shin Pain

    Basic advice from a non-doctor, for what it's worth: pain from a stress fracture will be isolated to a particular point on your leg bone, while pain from shin splints will affect a larger area on your shin.  If your shin splints won't heel after a couple of weeks, I would consult with a professional.





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  • grayhairontherun Pro 94 posts since
    Dec 15, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Apr 30, 2010 6:55 AM (in response to ActiveWatches Dave)
    Re: Shin Pain

    I suffered with shin splints twice when starting c25k. Initially, it wasn't so bad and I bought new running shoes and was fine. The next time, I was up to running 2.5 miles and due to weather changed my running surface from dirt to asphalt and at the same time, increased my distance. Ouch. I was in extreme pain for 2 weeks and pain if I tried to run for another week. I got custom orthotics, iced after every run, and started c25k from the beginning again - this time on asphalt. I had some mild pain with this transition but with the ice and rest days, I was able to progress. Now I run nearly 3 miles and don't have any problems.

    I read somewhere that aches and pains can be ok but if it interferes with your stride at all, stop!

    Good luck, be patient, wear good shoes (and maybe get orthotics), and take it slow. You have the rest of your life to run, if you take care of yourself!





    Patty

    C25K: graduated Dec 2009
    restarted Jan 2010 after 2 wks off due to injury

    Graduated March 7, 2010

    Goal: run 5k regularly
  • TIPPET 7 Pro 64 posts since
    Mar 25, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. Apr 30, 2010 7:03 AM (in response to Sh1Do)
    Re: Shin Pain

    I have shin splints and sometimes running shoes can help, but for me I bough Brooks and I still get shin splints.  I have found a great way to treat them though.  After I run I ice both legs for 20 minutes and then take a hand held massage tool and use some oil and run it down my shins, until I find a sore spot.  Then I use the tool to press very hard in the sore area and go back and forth across the shin.  It hurts like heck, but it really keeps my shin splints under control.  I sit at a computer all day and have found that if I tap my foot with my heel on the ground everyday, it build up the shin muscles.  Eventually my shin splints will go away completely but for now I am building up the muscles in my shins.  I can tell a major difference since I started running and now with the treatments.  I got a lot of this info from an ebay book I bought called " SHIN SPLINT CURE" by Adam Reese.   You should look into it.   I think it would help.





  • Dallasdoll08 Pro 111 posts since
    Feb 11, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. Apr 30, 2010 7:19 AM (in response to grayhairontherun)
    Re: Shin Pain

    I'm curious about the orthotics.  Did you have to go to a podiatrist or orthopedist?  I have been running on the treadmill without any problems at all through the entire C25K program.  I have tried transitioning to asphalt outdoors and have had terrible shin pain from the beginning.  I was fitted for Saucony shoes at Luke's Locker when I starated the program back in February but perhaps there are better ones for shin proglems?  I'm getting discouraged with trying to run outdoors.





    Linda
                           
  • rbird Legend 1,073 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    6. Apr 30, 2010 7:37 AM (in response to Dallasdoll08)
    Re: Shin Pain

    When I suffered from shin splints, ice and the furniture lift exercise described on this page helped:

     

    http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_5/183.shtml

     

    I started using the Chi Running form about 6 months ago and that has virtually eliminated my shin problems.

     

    bob





    2010 Space Coast Marathon 4:27:39

    2011 Charleston Marathon 4:25:58

    2011 Croom Fools Run 50k 6:16:51

    2011 Marine Corps Marathon 4:24:48

    2011 Jacksonville Bank Marathon 4:44:12 (4:45 Pace Leader)

    2012 Florida Keys Ragnar Relay 28:20:47 (3rd place-Mixed Ultra)


    Check it out - I'm bloggin'!

  • Haselsmasher Legend 507 posts since
    May 25, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. Apr 30, 2010 7:43 AM (in response to Sh1Do)
    Re: Shin Pain

    I don't want to ignite the whole orthotics-are-bad debate, but *in general* my recommendation is to avoid them if at all possible.  Yes - there are clearly situations where they are needed, however in my opinion, generally speaking, they're gone to very quickly.

     

    rbird's link I think is a good one.  I've found strengthening the shin muscles helps a lot.  There are other things like stretching, icing, etc.  And all of that fits into the "mainstream" methods for addressing shin splints.  A form change (again, per rbird's point) can help a lot.  Chi Running is one.  Pose Method is another.  Evolution Running is yet another.

     

    I documented here the complete regimen I used when I had them.

     

    Jim





    http://jimhaselmaier.blogspot.com/


    "Kick off your high heel sneakers, it's party time."

    -- From the song FM by Steely Dan

  • TIPPET 7 Pro 64 posts since
    Mar 25, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    8. Apr 30, 2010 8:02 AM (in response to Haselsmasher)
    Re: Shin Pain

    Jim,

     

    I like your article.  I am a heel striker and I guarantee that is why I have shin splints.  How do I change that?





  • Haselsmasher Legend 507 posts since
    May 25, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    9. Apr 30, 2010 9:04 AM (in response to TIPPET 7)
    Re: Shin Pain

    If you want to get away from heel striking my recommendation would be to check out the 3 relatively-popular forms (Chi Running, Pose Method, and Evolution Running) and see, broadly, which one feels best to you (mentally) from a style, description, and thought process perspective.  Then I'd go get that book and give it a read.   I've read the Chi Running and Pose Method books.  I have not studied Evolution Running at all so can't comment on it.

     

    In my opinion Chi and Pose are very siImilar.  I know a number of people (some who like Chi and others who like Pose) that would disagree with that generalization.  I'll start by stating (get my bias out on the table) that I prefer Pose.  It's a better match for the way my analytic brain works.  I think Chi probably has better marketing.  In my opinion it's more slickly packaged and probably has better name recognition.  I think Pose is more comprehensive and more precise.  Pose has a much more comprehensive set of drills (which are done when NOT running to help you understand the basic sensations, which your brain can then call on when actually running; as well as some fantastic strengthening and flexibility exercises).  Danny Dreyer tries to tie Chi and Tai Chi concepts to running.  It just doesn't work well for me.  I'm not saying Chi doesn't exist or anything like that; this is not an eastern-philosphies-don't-work comment, I just felt that that attempted tie together seemed weak.  I think it really comes down to a "Coke or Pepsi" decision:  They're both colas.  Yes - they're different - but still quite similar.  It's a matter of taste and style.  If you asked runners who learned either I think you MIGHT find people learn Chi more quickly.  I've been working on Pose for 4 months and I'm just now feeling like it's starting to click.  Clearly there are impressive success stories with both programs.  Even though I've been working on Pose for 4 months would I still choose that if I had to do it all over again?  Absolutely.  I didn't mention that I read Chi first, then tried to implement it.  I just didn't get it.  I ended up getting injuried.  I'm not saying it's Chi's fault, but I failed miserably when trying to learn it.  While Pose has been hard and frustrating, I'm convinced it is the right solution for me and if I was forced to start from scratch I'd go with Pose.

     

    In my opinion videoing yourself is absolutely essential.  It is absolutely astonishing to me how I think I'll be doing something the right way and, when I look at a video, I'm not even close.  I struggle to see how someone can go through such a fundamental change, which involves breaking habits that are very well established, without comparing how something is vs. how it looks.

     


    Jim





    http://jimhaselmaier.blogspot.com/


    "Kick off your high heel sneakers, it's party time."

    -- From the song FM by Steely Dan

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,369 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    11. Apr 30, 2010 10:22 AM (in response to Haselsmasher)
    Re: Shin Pain

    This is an interesting thread.

     

    Jim, I think your analysis is spot-on.  I totally agree with the video-taping part and it's something I need to do.  One thing I would add is there are many good, usable concepts in both Chi and Pose, even if you don't buy into the whole program.  Though it's probably easier to learn them within the structure of the program.

     

    And one question.  Has anybody looked into shin splints in relation to varicose veins?  I have a feeling that's what causes mine.  I only get them sometimes, only when pushing the pace, and only in the leg with this ugly cluster of veins.

     

    Len





    Len

  • rbird Legend 1,073 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    12. Apr 30, 2010 12:38 PM (in response to Haselsmasher)
    Re: Shin Pain

    I’m not personally familiar with any of the methods except Chi Running, however from what I have read on this forum, I would agree they seem to share similar elements.

     

    Regarding the “Chi” in Chi Running – I never bought into the concept literally and in fact some of the claims in the book I thought were a little over the top.  The value in it for me was as a visualization technique to help learn the form.  I imagine “Chi” flowing fluid-like through my body.  Much of the running form is designed to facilitate that flow – in particular straightening your spine, leveling your hips, and relaxing your shoulders and limbs.

     

    A lot of the book deals with body sensing and being aware of your position, and it advocates using video too.  I haven’t tried it yet and I have a feeling that when I do I will discover that my body sensing skills need some improvement.

     

    bob





    2010 Space Coast Marathon 4:27:39

    2011 Charleston Marathon 4:25:58

    2011 Croom Fools Run 50k 6:16:51

    2011 Marine Corps Marathon 4:24:48

    2011 Jacksonville Bank Marathon 4:44:12 (4:45 Pace Leader)

    2012 Florida Keys Ragnar Relay 28:20:47 (3rd place-Mixed Ultra)


    Check it out - I'm bloggin'!

  • grayhairontherun Pro 94 posts since
    Dec 15, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    13. Apr 30, 2010 5:47 PM (in response to Dallasdoll08)
    Re: Shin Pain

    DallasDoll - I went to a physical therapist who specializes in runners. He diagnosed my shin splints (which were actually located near the inside of my knee), did a gait analysis (video of me walking, since I was in too much pain to run), and fitted the orthotics. I only wear them in my running shoes. Since these cost $130, I'd be sure get them from someone who knows what they are doing. Mine are "semi-custom". That means, they are pre-made but he had something like 14 different types and chose the one that was best for me.

     

    Good luck to every one with the shin splints.  Pardon the language but - it really sucks to deal with. I remember all too well the searing pain when I walked.





    Patty

    C25K: graduated Dec 2009
    restarted Jan 2010 after 2 wks off due to injury

    Graduated March 7, 2010

    Goal: run 5k regularly

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