Skip navigation
Community: Exchange advice in the forums and read running commentary Resources: Personal running log, calculators, links and other tools for runners News: Running news from around the world Training: Articles and advice about fitness, race training and injury prevention Races/Results: Find upcoming races and past results Home: The Cool Running homepage
Cool Running homepage  Search Cool Running Community

11909 Views 34 Replies Latest reply: Jun 29, 2011 11:13 AM by Julie Ann Hackett RSS Go to original post 1 2 3 Previous Next
  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,267 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    30. Aug 3, 2010 11:40 AM (in response to Wideguy)
    Re: Running Barefoot

    Wideguy wrote:

     

    ExperiencedRunner wrote:

     

    I would be very cautious of running barefoot.  You could do some very serious damage to you feet if you were to step on glass, sharp gravel etc.  running shoes do much more than protect you feet from sharp objects, then cushion the foot from the many, many pounds of force that one places on them from motion.  I am concerned for the long term effects on your muscles, joints, and bones of your feet from barefoot running....

    Emphasis mine... Actually that statemeent has been proven false many times.  Running shoes , in fact , do NOTHING to reduce the impact forces your body feels while running. Your body still takes that exact same hit, each and every step. In fact much research is showing that  barefoot runners  actually DO begin to run more gently, less actual impact forces.  All those cushy shoes do is block the pain until later when your body cools down.

    http://www.barefootrunning.fas.harvard.edu/4BiomechanicsofFootStrike.html

     

    That's a link to a study conducted at harvard that shows that heel striking runners actually absorb a double peak of impact  and the impact hits much more suddenly than a barefooter.

    That study is more of a comparison of heel to forefoot.  It appears from the graphs that heel striking is the same whether barefoot or shod, and the same is true of forefoot.  But heel striking appears to have a "dual peak" which forefoot does not.  The peak impact seems to be pretty much the same for all four modes.  Interestingly, it does not deal (directly) with midfoot striking, which is the mode many barefoot runners fall into.  I thought that was a big shortcoming of the study.

     

    Len





    Len

  • Wideguy Legend 1,161 posts since
    Aug 27, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    31. Aug 16, 2010 1:11 PM (in response to lenzlaw)
    Re: Running Barefoot

    They do talk very briefly about midfoot but you are right, the study uses the term forefoot more exclusively.. and you are right that  they show  the impact of heel strike is the same shod or bare.   Any runner, shod or not, CAN learn a fore or midfoot strike and derive the benefits thereof.   What most barefoot and true minimalist footwear followers will tell you is it is just a whole lot EASIER to learn that technique  barefoot. As they say in the study , a heel strike with a bare foot  is simply too painful to do for long... it will train you instinctively to stop doing it.  Learning the same thing with a 1" wedge of foam under your heel is  much harder to do.

     

    what the study does explain in great detail, and often gets overlooked is

    A)  The impact forces of a bare heel strike  and a shod heel strike are virtually identical in magnitude and profile. Both display that same impact transient. It dispels the notion that shoes in any way REDUCE impact.  According to the study, They simply don't.

    and

    B)  The overall peak in relation to body mass is almost the same heel or fore ( although fore is slightly less)  but the rate of increase of force, in biophysical context, is MUCH slower in a forefoot landing, taking almost half a second per stride to reach impact  with a forefoot stride vs an almost instantaneous impact spike  in a heel strike.  





    C25K GRADUATE!
    Complete 10/30/10

    And then I let it all go again. More "restarts" than I can count but I haven't given up hope or trying yet. So who knows what's possible.

  • Wideguy Legend 1,161 posts since
    Aug 27, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    32. Aug 16, 2010 1:19 PM (in response to Wideguy)
    Re: Running Barefoot

    On a related note... if there are any runners in the southeast Mass. or eastern RI area  interested in learning, explring or expanding their knowledge and techinques on barefoot running,  on August 28th  in Sandwich Mass, the Metro Boston Barefoot Runners Meetup group is sponsoring a clinic.   Assisting and speaking at the clinic will be Dr.Irene Davis. Dr. Davis is a professor of physical therapy and head of the Running  Injury Clinic at the University of Delaware. She is one of the world’s  leading experts on running biomechanics and injury.

     

    You have to register with meetup.com  to RSVP  but open to all as far as I know ..





    C25K GRADUATE!
    Complete 10/30/10

    And then I let it all go again. More "restarts" than I can count but I haven't given up hope or trying yet. So who knows what's possible.

  • samantha103 Rookie 2 posts since
    Aug 30, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    33. Aug 30, 2010 4:39 PM (in response to jeff19)
    Re: Running Barefoot

    Advocates claim that running barefoot improves foot biomechanics and  reduces injury risk. And while studies have found that running  efficiency increases by 4% while running barefoot, there is still a lack  of well-designed studies comparing the incidence of injuries in runners  wearing shoes with those running barefoot.

    __________________

    --You must be the change you wish to see in the world.~Mahatma Gandhi

    saucony running shoes

  • Julie Ann Hackett Legend 221 posts since
    Nov 20, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    34. Jun 29, 2011 11:13 AM (in response to jeff19)
    Re: Running Barefoot

    I too have read "Born to Run" and think it gives great insight into shoes vs barefoot running.  I like to do my barefoot running as crosstaining and still do the bulk of my running in sneakers.  After reading the book I ditched my orthotics and opted for sneakers without all the added stability I had become so dependent on.  I also don't track the miles on my sneaks and wear them until they are dead.  I started my barefoot running with a pair of VFF.  I loved them so much I wore them on a 2 week raft trip and after so much time in the water with bits of grit swimming around in them, the lining got worn and uncomfortable. When I shoppped around for a new pair I was disappointed with how high tech they've become.  I switched from the VFF to a pair of huaraches from invisibleshoe.com.  I like the huaraches way better than the VFF.  They are closer to actually running barefoot (which I do on occasion but needed something for the trails and the summer when the pavement is too hot).  I'd like to do more of my running barefoot, but know that I need to take it slowly and increase gradually.  Its been very helpful for working on my form.  I hadn't run barefoot in a while but started having some wierd pains in my left glute so I took off my shoes and after the first few steps could feel and hear how badly my heels were slapping the ground.  Now that I've been incorporating the barefoot running back into my training plan, no more pain!

1 2 3 Previous Next

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...