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667 Views 1 Reply Latest reply: Feb 28, 2011 1:05 PM by lenzlaw RSS
dave877 Rookie 1 posts since
Feb 28, 2011
Currently Being Moderated

Feb 28, 2011 12:14 PM

Off-season rules of thumb?

Hi, everyone!

 

I just finished a half-marathon, and I'm thinking it'll be a good idea to rest a bit before starting to train for my next big race.

 

My question is: what guidelines should I follow that:

 

1, greatly reduces my risk of longterm running injuries, while

2, not losing too much?

 

I realize I'm gonna backslide if I want to avoid injuries, so I'm okay with that.  I know from past experience that if I stop running for 2 weeks, it's like starting over when I do re-start.  Is that the price of injury-free running?  I'd rather run slower than not run!

 

Some background info on me:
* Male, 5'10", 205 lb.  I'm definitely on the heavy side -- no skinny runner phyique here.

* Been running 2.5 years.

* Longest distances: two half-marathons.

* 5K pace is in the 9-minute range; my half-marathon pace this past weekend was 10.5.

* No current injuries (knock on wood), although my right knee is slightly damaged from many years ago, and generally is okay so long as I stretch properly.

* I currently have no difficulties running, and would like to keep it that way.

 

I'm guessing I'll have to learn what my body needs/wants, but if people can give me ballpark ranges to think about, that'd be great!

 

Thanks in advance!

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,375 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Feb 28, 2011 1:05 PM (in response to dave877)
    Re: Off-season rules of thumb?

    You really don't need to take much time off.  Do some walking for a couple days and when you feel ready (your legs will let you know), run easy and short.  You should go about two weeks (one day per mile of the race) with no hard or long workouts.  But it's OK to run.  After that you can ease back into your regular training routine.

     

    Len





    Len

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