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1384 Views 4 Replies Latest reply: Oct 19, 2010 8:19 PM by chuntley
JamieW22 Rookie 1 posts since
Oct 18, 2010
Currently Being Moderated

Oct 19, 2010 6:16 PM

Heart Rate and running

Hi,

I'm a 47 year old male with a few months of running under my belt.  I do about 5K every other day without killing myself, but it is still challenging.  I just got a heart rate monitor and I've found that running in the 140-155 bpm zone is fairly doable without much discomfort.  In reading some of the information on heart rate and running, my maximum heart rate is about 173 (220-47(myage)).  This seems about right because my heart will do almost that high if I push it to the max.  If I am getting my information correct, I should be aiming for 60% to 70% of that which is around 105-120 bpm.  I can get that rate with a brisk walk!  Am I missing something here or should I go to the emergency room!  BTW, I did have a complete physical about a year ago and got the go ahead.

 

Is it healthy for me to run in the 140-155 bpm range?

  • aace2001 Amateur 30 posts since
    Jan 8, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Oct 19, 2010 6:34 PM (in response to JamieW22)
    Re: Heart Rate and running

    From what I've read 60% is fat burning and 80% is cardio. I'm 49 and target 140 on the eliptical and have been hitting 155-165 jogging in week4 of c25k.  I get a headache if I go much higher. These are also just average suggestions and can vary based on your condition.

     

    As always see a doc before starting any excersie routine...

  • Surfing_Vol Legend 848 posts since
    Nov 6, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. Oct 19, 2010 6:45 PM (in response to JamieW22)
    Re: Heart Rate and running

    Jamie,

     

    First, the "maximum heart rate" is a rule of thumb and does not apply to everyone.  Second, aerobic training (running) will increase your maximum heart rate.  Third, heart rate monitoring is a way to help with perceived effort.  The zones, just like the maximum heart rate, are guidelines, not fixed in stone.

     

    So, keep running in the 140-155 bpm zone until you start longer runs.  In those runs, you should back off on your speed and heart rate.

     

    If you want to find out more, there is a lot of information on the internet.

     

    Good luck, and keep running.

     

    Surfing Vol





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  • chuntley Amateur 23 posts since
    Jun 22, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Oct 19, 2010 8:19 PM (in response to JamieW22)
    Re: Heart Rate and running

    The science behind the 220 minus Age formula is pretty inexact. I'm about your age and my maximum heart rate is over 190. I tend to run my long slow days at between 150 and 155 bpm, which for me feels pretty easy. Hard(-ish) tempo runs are usually 165-175 bpm, and I regularly push it to 185 bpm or so in a 5K race. If you look online you may find zone estimators that use other formulas to estimate and account for your maximum heart rate. I use a zone calculator based on "heart rate reserve," which tends to feel more natural than the zone charts posted at the gym.

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,422 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. Oct 19, 2010 7:36 PM (in response to JamieW22)
    Re: Heart Rate and running

    This has been discussed several times in the last few months.  Here are a couple threads.

     

    http://community.active.com/message/715006#715006

    http://community.active.com/thread/80291

     

    220 minus age is only valid for 50% or so of the general population.  It was not intended by its authors as a general rule.  You really need to be tested (in a lab or on your own) if you want to know your maximum (MHR).  Your MHR is fixed and personal, except: 1.) It is different for different types of exercise. Running seems to be highest; 2.) For a sedentary individual, it tends to drop by 1 beat per year as you age.

     

    Len





    Len

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