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5958 Views 71 Replies Latest reply: Nov 29, 2007 3:20 PM by PeterP002 RSS Go to original post 1 2 3 4 5 Previous Next
  • caaaaaa Rookie 80 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    30. Nov 27, 2007 6:17 PM (in response to Leggova)
    Re: An ethical dilemma - What would you do?

    quote:


    Originally posted by Leggova:

    Ha

    Medicine / Paediatrics


     



    Now that I know his field of concentration is in medicine, I feel far more confident in saying that it's not the ethical thing to give him a "break" for the second time. His career will deal with other people's health and well-being, and being in pediatrics, children's health and lives.

    I think your larger ethical obligation is to the patients whose lives and health his work/research in the future will affect.

    If he can't do the work required for his degree, will he be capable of doing the work in his career?

  • caaaaaa Rookie 80 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    32. Nov 27, 2007 6:23 PM (in response to Leggova)
    Re: An ethical dilemma - What would you do?

    Okay.  But do you have confidence that his work/research will be of quality?   Could his inabilities affect any work that may one day affect someone's health?

    I agree that most of us probably do not understand the cultural factors you (and he) are dealing with.  I do not envy you, Leggova!   Good luck.  You are a smart, rational person.  I'm sure you'll do the right thing, whatever it may be.

  • Suesquatch Rookie 164 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    33. Nov 27, 2007 7:09 PM (in response to Leggova)
    Re: An ethical dilemma - What would you do?

    I say don't report him and find out how to get him a mental health referral.

    Not your business indeed.

    We're trying to have a society here, people.

  • Chris the Wheeler019 Rookie 187 posts since
    Nov 1, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    35. Nov 27, 2007 7:14 PM (in response to Leggova)
    Re: An ethical dilemma - What would you do?

    You already gave him a break. How many times has he pulled this in the past?  How many Profs has he already sang his sad song to?  I'd be willing to bet he's pulled this in the past.

    He's a cheat and he's been caught.  I think you need to slam this guy. His situation is not your concern.  If you are gonna dance, you gotta pay the piper.  He won't be losing face, he sold his face.

  • CallipyG Rookie 9 posts since
    Jan 3, 2001
    Currently Being Moderated
    36. Nov 27, 2007 7:34 PM (in response to Leggova)
    Re: An ethical dilemma - What would you do?

    give him an incomplete.  tellhim he has XX days to get you another version, 100% not plagiarized.  you will give him the minimum acceptable passing grade.

  • jcumming Amateur 704 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    37. Nov 27, 2007 8:12 PM (in response to Leggova)
    Re: An ethical dilemma - What would you do?

    Tough call Leggo, but I fall firmly on the DT, Suesquatch side of the fence on this one.

    I always went on the premise that the 3 P's better come in the correct order

    1 People
    2 Policy
    3 Paperwork

    (sort of opposite to the German Army where policy was everything  )

    Give the guy an F.

  • HDH Amateur 332 posts since
    Aug 19, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    38. Nov 27, 2007 8:19 PM (in response to Leggova)
    Re: An ethical dilemma - What would you do?

    He did it once and you told him it was wrong.  He did it again and his reaction is one of someone who has been caught in the act.

    His fault is not your problem. Follow school policy and report the matter. He will not "change his spots" but will only continue to do what he has done in the past.

    ----



    hdh[/URL" target="_blank">

  • trunx Rookie 25 posts since
    Sep 26, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    39. Nov 27, 2007 8:20 PM (in response to Leggova)
    Re: An ethical dilemma - What would you do?

    I guess the other thing to consider are the consequences to you for not following the policy.  What happens when he repeats the behavior in another class, gets caught and the next prof follows the policy.  I can imagine the student bringing up this situation as an example of how it been handled in the past – potentially exposing you to disciplinary action.

  • Aslowhiteguy053 Rookie 59 posts since
    Jul 14, 2001
    Currently Being Moderated
    40. Nov 27, 2007 8:21 PM (in response to Leggova)
    Re: An ethical dilemma - What would you do?

    have you spoken to any of his other instructors?  do they suspect he cheats in their class too?

  • NYCross Rookie 161 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    41. Nov 27, 2007 9:13 PM (in response to Leggova)
    Re: An ethical dilemma - What would you do?

    Report him as a cheater AND report him as a mental health liability. The two aren't mutually exclusive.

    Suicides in HK and the Va Tech shootings are tragic happenings, but they should not be made into an excuse to let dishonest people who may or may not be mentally troubled get away with cheating.

  • ellenshana Rookie 321 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    42. Nov 27, 2007 9:45 PM (in response to Leggova)
    Re: An ethical dilemma - What would you do?

    I'm not going to read anybody else's responses until I write mine.

    Inform the graduate school.

  • Diane95 Rookie 181 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    43. Nov 27, 2007 9:52 PM (in response to Leggova)
    Re: An ethical dilemma - What would you do?

    I have no idea what you should do, nor anything to add beyond what people have already said.

    I just wanted to say that this is a stellar scenario for jumpstarting the discussion of academic integrity at a future faculty meeting, and I hope you don't mind if I use it (any identifying features removed, naturally). <ingratiating smiley>

  • rocketgirl047 Rookie 20 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    44. Nov 27, 2007 10:40 PM (in response to Leggova)
    Re: An ethical dilemma - What would you do?

    You already gave him a chance before.  At this point, the only ethical thing to do is to follow university policy.  (You asked what the ethical thing to do was; you did not ask what the right thing to do was, or if they were different or the same).

    If you are concerned for the student's mental health, personally notify the counseling service.  Perhaps, a counselor should also be present when the student receives the bad news, and through each step of the disciplinary process.  If the student is expelled, the counseling service may not be of help after that point, but they should have a referral ready to someone outside the university who can counsel the student. I don't know what further the university can do.  Given the cultural thing, it would probably do more harm than good to give any advance notice to the family.

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