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11215 Views 219 Replies Latest reply: Dec 20, 2007 7:28 PM by bigapplepie RSS Go to original post 1 2 3 4 ... 15 Previous Next
  • Iontach Rookie 1,340 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    15. Dec 1, 2007 1:00 PM (in response to kommish77)
    Re: Church question

    quote:


    Originally posted by the kenyan:

    har har har


     



    It was an honest question.  Want to take another crack at it?

  • makeda023 Rookie 629 posts since
    Aug 16, 1999
    Currently Being Moderated
    16. Dec 1, 2007 2:37 PM (in response to kommish77)
    Re: Church question

    quote:


    Originally posted by NYCross:

    My parents always made me go to church as a child. I know if I told them I wanted nothing more to do with any church, they would still love me, but I also know that it would be a constant source of sadness and inner turmoil for them.


     



    I always feared the same reaction from my mother. So, like you, I lied for a long time. When I finally told her I was agnostic, she was good-natured about it. We joked around and she had me tell her the story of the prodigal son. She still tries to get me go to church, of course. She thinks I'm just going through a phase. !http://www.coolrunning.com/forums/biggrin.gif|src=http://www.coolrunning.com/forums/biggrin.gif|border=0!

    I too, sometimes miss the social and ritual aspects of church.

  • ctjim Amateur 151 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    17. Dec 1, 2007 2:40 PM (in response to kommish77)
    Re: Church question

    quote:


    Originally posted by kommish77:

    Do you go to church now?

    Did you used to go to church and now don't?

    Have you never been to church (not including weddings, funerals, etc)?


     



    No.

    Yes, up to about age 18.

    The answer to your third question is in the answer to the second question. 

  • CarsonW Rookie 56 posts since
    Nov 16, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    18. Dec 1, 2007 2:55 PM (in response to kommish77)
    Re: Church question

    Yes, every week.

    I think that answers two and three also.

    I grew up in a family with an agnostic mother with a Methodist background and an atheist father who was raised Catholic. I have only begun to explore religion in the last 12 years or so because of my wife and her Catholic faith. I take what I need from it. If you can set aside some of the disturbing historical stories about the church and use the teachings as a blueprint for good living, I think there is a great deal of value there.

  • bigapplepie Legend 2,455 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    20. Dec 1, 2007 3:29 PM (in response to kommish77)
    Re: Church question

    quote:


    Originally posted by kommish77:

    Do you go to church now?

    Did you used to go to church and now don't?

    Have you never been to church (not including weddings, funerals, etc)?


     



    No.
    Yes.
    Yes.

    quote:


    Originally posted by kommish77:

    First off, God will be the final judge of that.


     



    There's a God?

  • wkm99 Rookie 337 posts since
    Jun 30, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    21. Dec 1, 2007 4:17 PM (in response to kommish77)
    Re: Church question

    Re: Church questionDo you go to church now?[B]

    Yes

    [B]Did you used to go to church and now don't?[B]

    I didn't attend church with my family growing up so I attended church with friends and neighbors' families.

    My DH grew up in a churched home, very stable, normal, loving home life, very American, apple pie and all that.

    [B]Have you never been to church (not including weddings, funerals, etc)?[B]

    After marriage, our church attendance was sporadic at best. We'd attend major holiday church services, had our sons baptized with aunts & uncles as god parents, etc. But, that was about it.

    We didn't attend church regularly when our kids were very little but eventually started to attend church every week as the kids grew up.  First of all, let me clarify that our way is not the best or only way to raise kids.  I'm only sharing what we did and what has worked for us.  That said, our church life has nothing short of great.  It's not a fire 'n brimstone church but a very middle of the road type church.  Our kids are surrounded by great friends, clean-cut, straight arrow types.  This was very important to me as they are growing up in their JHS and HS years.  It's a scary world out there even at school, the foul language is very bad and there are a lot of mean-spirited kids or people.  I wanted them to know the difference and hang out with whom they're comfortable with.  Just like their parents do.  I also wanted them to know that there's more to life than just school, work, sports, repeat.  I wanted them to have spiritual growth, faith and something in their soul, mind, heart, something to fall back on especially when life's not always so rosey in the future. 

    Our kids have fellowship and a wonderful social life as well. Same thing with DH and me. I can't say enough great things about our church life. We have a good balance of family time and church life. It's all been wonderful. !http://www.coolrunning.com/forums/smile.gif|src=http://www.coolrunning.com/forums/smile.gif|border=0!

    We're all in it together and we do a lot of charitable works for the community. For example, we all caravan together to feed homeless, clean-up parks, have food drives where we donated over a thousand boxes of food so disadvantaged families can have holiday dinners. Those with haircutting skills such as pro hairstylists shampoo & give haircuts to abused women's shelters. We have meals on wheels for the elderly. We have toy drives for orphanages and abused children's homes. Community service is a big commitment for our church and it teaches us how to treat others not only charitably but for our unchurched friends or anybody.

    We also have get-togethers in people's homes, fellowship, potlucks, and break up into smaller groups. We've met a lot of terrific people this way. They are kind, considerate, well-mannered, respectful and it's very refreshing.

    Even though we get along fine with neighbors, friends and family, our church is a wonderful escape into a world of sincere goodness.  It's a very special part of our lives.  Truly. 

  • NYCross Rookie 161 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    22. Dec 1, 2007 6:06 PM (in response to kommish77)
    Re: Church question

    quote:


    Originally posted by Kawasaki500:

    You can't answer yes to the second question and no to the third. That's like saying "I used to go to church but I've never been to church."


     



    Actually, no is technically the correct answer for the third question if you have been to church. If you answer "yes", you're saying- yes, I have NEVER been to church and if you answer "no", you get a double negative. I guess the less ambiguous question would have been "have you EVER been to church".

    But I don't actually miss the social aspect, it's more that I'd consider going to church if I felt there was more potential for making friends. There have been very few women like me in churches that I've gone to or visited- single, left-brained, career oriented, athletic and content with being single (I'm not anti-marriage, but I'd have no sadness in staying single if I didn't meet someone I wanted to make that big a commitment to). I was actually accused at a church I went to of not wanting God's will for my life because it was not my life goal to become a SAHM.

    More men seem to share my interests than women, so I generally make female friends through running and work. I guess it's just become obvious to me that religion in itself isn't something I care about (or believe in completely), and the other things that generally go along with women in churches (like kids, music and... um, kids) aren't something I have any interest in at all. I do non child-related charity work, but since I do it after work and on holidays (aka. family time/dinner time), the people I meet through that who subscribe to religion have tended to be more "spiritual" than regular church attender types.

  • devholan Rookie 131 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    23. Dec 1, 2007 6:10 PM (in response to kommish77)
    Re: Church question

    quote:


    Originally posted by kommish77:

    First off, God will be the final judge of that.

    <snip>

    If they answer "I said a prayer" or "I asked Jesus into my heart" I would be concerned. If the prayer or the asking into the heart was secondary and they told me they believe that Jesus died for their sins on the Cross and that is the only reason (nothing more, nothing less) they can get to Heaven, then it's all good.


     



    Well if you believe that G-d is the final judge, then that's that. Don't you think? It doesn't matter what you believe will provide a person with the entry ticket, as your last paragraph describes.

    Your version of heaven filled only with people who believe in Jesus (as the savior) sounds very much like most of the country clubs in the US up until the last few decades.  Oh, except maybe your version allows women in, too.

  • devholan Rookie 131 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    25. Dec 1, 2007 6:19 PM (in response to kommish77)
    Re: Church question

    Definitely not!  Did I misread your post?  If so, sorry.

    But I thought you were saying that only those who believe in Jesus as the Savior and the one who died for their sins go to heaven.

  • korts Rookie 16 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    27. Dec 1, 2007 7:59 PM (in response to kommish77)
    Re: Church question

    quote:


    Originally posted by kommish77:

    Correct... and everyone has that option to believe. So it's like a country club for anyone and everyone !http://www.coolrunning.com/forums/wink.gif|src=http://www.coolrunning.com/forums/wink.gif|border=0!


     



    Belief is not a choice. I can no more choose to believe in the divinity of Christ than I can choose to believe that the earth is flat.

    If belief were a choice for me, I'd likely be a Christian. Culturally, it makes sense for me. But faith eludes me.


    --


    <br /><b>korts</b><br /><A HREF="http://<br />interwovendesign.com/kick/<br />userdisplay.php3?<br />username=korts" TARGET=_blank>Me</A> <br /><br />There's a sandwich in every <br />beer.<br /><br />"To be clear: I don't respect <br />these ladies, I see no reason <br />to, whether the snobbity <br />socialist or the soldierthat's
    how my entries should read."
    - skms

    Hi General Hayden!





    There's a sandwich in every beer.

  • bburgoyne26 Rookie 245 posts since
    Jul 9, 2003
    Currently Being Moderated
    29. Dec 1, 2007 9:47 PM (in response to kommish77)
    Re: Church question

    quote:


    Originally posted by kommish77:

    Belief is a choice. You have a choice right now to either accept or reject Christ.... the choice is yours.


     



    we are only called to believe in Christ, not to "decide" to believe in Christ...

    John 6:44 "No one can come to me unless the Father who sent me draws him, and I will raise him up at the last day."

    John 6:65 "And he said, Therefore said I unto you, that no man can come unto me, except it were given unto him of my Father."

    John 14:6 "Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me."

    John 15:16" Ye have not chosen me, but I have chosen you",

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