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2221 Views 4 Replies Latest reply: Aug 2, 2007 2:21 PM by Trish18 RSS
Trish18 Active.com Staff 457 posts since
Jun 5, 2007
Currently Being Moderated

Jul 6, 2007 9:02 AM

Equality & the NCAA

Thirty-five years after Congress passed Title IX, the landmark federal law requiring gender equity in scholastic athletics, the percentage of women's teams coached by women is at its lowest point ever.

 

More men also are coaching women's teams than at any other time in history, and the average salaries for coaches of women's teams still trail those of coaches for men's teams, according to an Associated Press review of statistics provided by the NCAA and other groups.

 

It's easy to get caught on either side of the dichotomy of: women have come a long way or that women still have a long way to go in the eyes of equality. But I don't think those two options are mutually exclusive. I think both statements are accurate. What do you think?






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  • jinja Expert 42 posts since
    Jul 22, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Aug 2, 2007 12:13 PM (in response to Trish18)
    Re: Equality & the NCAA

    I agree that we have come along way, but there is still a huge gap between women and men, especially in athletics.  We are still so far behind that we look at the percentage of men coaching women's sports as a reference point.  The question of women coaching men's sports does not even come to mind.  Title IX was originally intended to reduce the gender gap in all aspects of federally funded educational institutions (academics, scholarships, athletics, etc..) It has become most newsworthy in the area of athletics, however.  I think it comes down to money, at this point.  Men's sports draw more revenue than women's sports.  Popular culture is centered around men's sports, so for now, they hold the cards.  Would you rather see a LA Lakers game or a LA Sparks game?

  • jinja Expert 42 posts since
    Jul 22, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Aug 2, 2007 12:55 PM (in response to Trish18)
    Re: Equality & the NCAA

    I wish I knew the answer.  What sells in the media is controversy.  For example, the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup received more media attention for Brandi Chastain's sports bra exposing celebration after she scored the winning goal, than the sports event.  I was sorry that she got raked over the coals for such an innocent act of celebration (yet another example of gender inequality); however, I was glad to see women's soccer gain some exposure. no pun intended.

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